Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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EyeSee You and the Internet of Things: Watching You While You Shop

EyeSee You and the Internet of Things: Watching You While You Shop | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Even the store mannequins have gotten in on the gig. According to the Washington Post, mannequins in some high-end boutiques are now being outfitted with cameras that utilize facial recognition technology. A small camera embedded in the eye of an otherwise normal looking mannequin allows storekeepers to keep track of the age, gender and race of all their customers. This information is then used to personally tailor the shopping experience to those coming in and out of their stores. As the Washington Post report notes, “a clothier introduced a children’s line after the dummy showed that kids made up more than half its mid-afternoon traffic… Another store found that a third of visitors using one of its doors after 4 p.m. were Asian, prompting it to place Chinese-speaking staff members by that entrance.”

At $5,072 a pop, these EyeSee mannequins come with a steep price tag, but for storeowners who want to know more—a lot more—about their customers, they’re the perfect tool, able to sit innocently at store entrances and windows, leaving shoppers oblivious to their hidden cameras. Italian mannequin maker Almax SpA, manufacturer of the EyeSee mannequins, is currently working on adding ears to the mannequins, allowing them to record people’s comments in order to further tailor the shopping experience.
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Virginia Tech: RoboJelly

Researchers at Virginia Tech and the University of Texas at Dallas built Robojelly from materials known as shape-memory alloys, which return to their original shape when bent. Eight moving segments wrapped in carbon nanotubes and coated with a platinum powder replicate the jellyfish's natural opening-and-closing method of propulsion.

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CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher

CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, Petraeus mused about the emergence of an “Internet of Things” — that is, wired devices — at a summit for In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm. “‘Transformational’ is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies,” Petraeus enthused, “particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft.”

 

All those new online devices are a treasure trove of data if you’re a “person of interest” to the spy community. Once upon a time, spies had to place a bug in your chandelier to hear your conversation. With the rise of the “smart home,” you’d be sending tagged, geolocated data that a spy agency can intercept in real time when you use the lighting app on your phone to adjust your living room’s ambiance.

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“Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation,” by B. Coleman

“Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation,” by B. Coleman | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"In her new book, “Hello Avatar,” artist and media theorist B. Coleman looks at the same virtual terrain and sees, rather than impoverishment and imaginative constriction, increasing personal agency, and even fulfillment."

 

"Faster than we realize the physical world is coming online. “Whether it is with RFID tags or another kind of sensor,” Coleman writes, “one finds information systems that, in real-time, track objects whose presence can be read by satellite, radio or scanner.” Media theorists use the term “social objects” for these in-building climatic sensors, GPS-equipped cars and phones, and an array of other trackable consumer products, and consider them part of a burgeoning “Internet of Things” that monitors energy use and geographic locations — the objects’ own and ours as well. And here lie more dystopian possibilities: “At what point do our ‘smart’ houses, cars, and appliances begin to report on our behavior?” she asks. “The risk lies in the prospect that as the thing becomes sensible, the human subject, as a subject of a network culture, becomes more thing-like.” She believes such fates can be mitigated if designers can make media technologies that are more transparent to us than we are to them."

 

via washingtonpost.com

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The Internet of Things – this is where we're going

The Internet of Things – this is where we're going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet: What are we connecting?
"The Internet of Things is not just about devices that are directly connected to the internet. Sensors and identifiers such as RFID (radio frequency identification) tags also provide data through an intermediary such as a mobile phone, RFID reader, or internet-connected base station.

 

This means an RFID-tagged cereal box may be considered as one of the “things” on the internet. Theoretically, the RFID would have been used in conjunction with other sensors to record the full life-history of that particular box of cereal, from the time it was manufactured to how it was transported and how long it took for it to be empty."

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The Internet of Things by Rob van Kranenburg

The Internet of Things by Rob van Kranenburg | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things is a critique of ambient technology and the all-seeing network of RFID by Rob van Kranenburg. Rob examines what impact RFID and other systems, will have on our cities and our wider society. He tells of his early encounters with the kind of location-based technologies that will soon become commonplace, and what they may mean for us all. He explores the emergence of the “internet of things”, tracing us through its origins in the mundane back-end world of the international supply chain to the domestic applications that already exist in an embryonic stage. He also explains how the adoption of the technologies of the City Control is not inevitable, nor something that we must kindly accept nor sleepwalk into. In van Kranenburg’s account of the creation of the international network of Bricolabs, he also suggests how each of us can help contribute to building technologies of trust and empower ourselves in the age of mass surveillance and ambient technologies.

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Dooming scenario

Dooming scenario | Web of Things | Scoop.it

In another scenario, where we can recognize a seamless network “of things” (Rob Van Kranenbrug, Internet of Things) – of cars, of cities, of washing machines communicating – the idea is to leave this network open, and not enclosed in the hands of one middleman, one government, or one or two states (and Moglen will use examples of USA and China), that can choose to act in their un-wisdom. Moglen argues, in a dooming scenario where big data is collected about each citizen, that “we need to reposses the web away from the man in the middle.” Otherwise, our memories will become inferior to this “big data” because what is collected will not be forgotten. “Media consumes us”, he concludes, “watching us watching it,” and the freedom of thought may be lost forever if there wasn't anyone left running free software, securing free (un-surveilled) media, leaving the seamless network – open.

 

In my view, the central question was revolving around the ways of securing our own autonomy[...]

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Wireless company probing "Internet of Things" for utilities

The number of connected objects is projected to reach 50 billion by 2020. Despite this, and the fact that the Internet of Things is viewed as a major driver of new service and business revenues, IoT has traditionally been held back by a lack of data sharing.


"For example, data from smart meters or road traffic surveillance cameras are used for one isolated application and not available for general use," said Graham Fisher, the Cambridge Wireless board member managing the project. "The future is a ‘converged IoT' world where real value can be obtained by sharing data and creating a sustainable marketplace for innovative applications and services."

 

via - FierceEnergy

 

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Wireless Sensor Networks Provide New Levels of Stealth

Wireless Sensor Networks Provide New Levels of Stealth | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"A wireless sensor network that Lockheed Martin calls the Self-Powered Ad-hoc Network (SPAN) is being deployed in the energy sector to monitor infrastructure such as pipelines. Their low energy use, and self-organizing mesh network, makes them ideal for ground surveillance. To aid in their deployment, the low-cost sensors are being camouflaged in housings that look like rocks, and the sensors harvest energy sources from the surrounding environment to extend their battery life.

 

The persistent surveillance system is monitored and controlled from a single machine that processes aggregate readings. The smart sensor network can cue a camera or unmanned aerial vehicle to further study an area or call an engineer when a pipeline or bridge structure is in danger of fracture.

 

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Lockheed Martin Launches Wireless Sensor Network System for Surveillance Operations

"US-based security company Lockheed Martin has launched a new wireless sensor network system called the Self-Powered Ad-hoc Network (SPAN) which consists of ground sensors. The sensors are small and can be easily camouflaged according to the surroundings thus enabling continuous surveillance of the secured area."

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