Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Industry heavyweights come together to standardize the Internet of Things

Industry heavyweights come together to standardize the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM and Intel are the latest companies to band together with the aim of standardizing interoperability across smart machines and ultimately, drive adoption of an Internet of Things. Announced last week, the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) is a not-for-profit open membership group created to establish common frameworks for development of inter-connected digital and physical worlds.

While the notion of device-to-device communication holds great potential across a range of industries, with different manufacturers using different engineering standards, development has been slow-moving in the eyes of some.


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4 Myths about the Internet of Things

Interesting read Kishore Swaminathan, Chief Scientist at Accenture, on the possibilities of the Internet of Things and the myths of the things that are stopping the thing called the Internet of things happening.

 

Myth 1: IoT is a Technology. IoT is a concept, not a technology you would buy. (See also: http://thebln.com/2013/04/the-internet-of-things-a-definition-according-to-cisco/).

 

Myth 2: IoT is the next wave of the Internet. The closest some devices will get to the Internet is using TCP/IP protocols.

 

Myth 3: Regulations on data privacy is a critical enabler of the IoT. Privacy concerns might give rise to more innovative business models, but that is no reason to hold off on understanding what the IoT means for businesses.

 

Myth 4: IoT needs device communication standards. Standards never hurt but most devices will be communicating for specialist and limited reasons.

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A Tiny Ten Year Battery For The Internet Of Things

A Tiny Ten Year Battery For The Internet Of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Just as protocol standards needed to be established for the Internet to really take off, so must standards be established for what many are calling the next technology revolution: the Internet of Things.


Weightless is an organization made up of over 50 tech companies around the world whose goal is to establish standards for wireless, machine to machine (M2M) short to mid-range communication over a wide area network (WAN). Three major standards that Weightless wants to establish are chipsets that cost less than $2, have a range of up to 10km, and have a battery life of 10 years. The life-extension technology for the batteries doesn’t exist just yet, but Neul, the UK wireless network company that will provide the chipset, says it has a “roadmap” for the 10-year battery life.


Singularity Hub

Peter Murray

30 Nov 2012

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M2M Standard - Weightless White Spaces

M2M Standard - Weightless White Spaces | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Neul has cemented some high-profile industry support for Weightless, its would-be global, open, royalty-free standard for M2M comms which utilizes TV white space frequencies to allow machines to talk to each other — with the formation today of a special interest group (SIG) that aims to accelerate the adoption of Weightless. It has also put out a call for more industry players to join the SIG.


ARM, Cable & Wireless Worldwide, CSR and Neul have signed the Weightless ‘SIG Promoter Agreement,’ which details how they will back its mission to establish a new standard and encourage global adoption. The standard the SIG will define is said to be on track for completion in early 2013. As well as a common set of standards for powering M2M comms, other key components required to power the Internet of Things are a chipset costing under $2, a range of up to 10km and a battery life of 10 years, according to the SIG.


Professor William Webb, CEO of Weightless, noted in a statement: “This is a very important milestone for Weightless. The SIG now has a board comprising leading players spanning processors, networks, chipsets and innovative wireless technologies. Weightless has gained a solid legal framework enabling royalty-free licensing of terminal-related technology. Our plan is to rapidly grow membership from our current base of 50 high-technology companies and I would strongly encourage interested parties to join this world-changing initiative.”

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Towards a sensor commons | Technology Treason

Towards a sensor commons | Technology Treason | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Summary via postscapes


Andrew Fisher @ajfisher put together a lengthy post on Tuesday titled "Towards a sensor commons"


Begins with:

"The action taking place is the creation of what I call the Sensor Commons. Why is this a revolution? Because as a population we are deciding that governments and civic planners no longer have the ability to provide meaningful information at a local level."


Definition:
"For me the Sensor Commons is a future state whereby we have data available to us, in real time from a multitude of sensors that are relatively similar in design and method of data acquisition and that data is freely available whether as a data set or by API to use in whatever fashion they like.


My definition is not just about “lots of data from lots of sensors” – there is a subtlety to it implied but the “relatively similar in design and method of data acquisition” statement."


and then goes on to break down 5 things he thinks are requirements for the Sensor Commons:

  1. Gain trust
  2. Become dispersible
  3. Be highly visible
  4. Be entirely open
  5. Be upgradeable
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Unifying a Fragmented “Internet of Things”

Speaking at the recent ITEXPO West conference, Dr. David Foote, CTO for Hitachi CTA and vice chair of the oneM2M Steering Committee, says because M2M market is overly fragmented, there are no standard APIs that developers can use to build M2M applications. Ultimately, this only serves to retard the development of the “Internet of Things,” which today is little more than a hodgepodge of incompatible proprietary systems.


To unify the “Internet of Things” Foote argues there needs to be a common set of services that can be invoked via an API. Developers will still be able to use multiple tools to invoke APIs, but each M2M platform should not require developers to learn yet another set of arcane APIs to build an application, says Foote.

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When it comes to the connected home, it's keep it simple, stupid

When it comes to the connected home, it's keep it simple, stupid | Web of Things | Scoop.it

As more people install smart NEST thermostats and use iPads to interact with their TVs, the stage is set for massive adoption of the completely connected home, right? Well, maybe.


Some big issues have to be sorted out before that will happen. For one thing, there is a Tower of Babel of standards for communicating between various devices made by different vendors to serve different purposes. That has to come together first, according to speakers at GigaOM’s Mobilize conference on Friday.


There are cool home automation devices coming out of Kickstarter as well as from consumer electronic giants. That variety is great except for the fact that if these things can’t talk to each other, they really aren’t connected at all.

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Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Services from healthcare to energy will change over the next decade as machine-to-machine communication facilitates more sophisticated automation.

 

The shift will be led by a combination of improved network communication, smaller and lower cost embedded devices and the development of common standards.

 

However, privacy, security and the risk of network congestion will need to be overcome, while technology standards and streamlined regulations are also a prerequisite.

 

These claims are made in a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), entitled Rise of the Machines

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Weightless finalizes its white spaces networking standard for the internet of things

Weightless finalizes its white spaces networking standard for the internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Weightless SIG claims the new standard will allow for ultra-low-power transmissions at long-range and at a cheap manufacturing cost. If true, that would make the technology ideal for M2M communications.
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We can't let the Internet of Things become the Tyranny of Things

We can't let the Internet of Things become the Tyranny of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things isn’t just some futuristic concept — it already exists. But often badly. For it to succeed, it will need an economy supported by developers who can rely on open standards and APIs.

 

"oT done wrong is the much maligned Internet refrigerator. Seriously? People have been talking about this dog for years now and seemingly every year some earnest manufacturer actually demonstrates yet another realization of this dubious vision, which usually consists of little more than a screen stuck onto the door like some giant fridge magnet. This is IoT designed by a committee.

 

IoT done wrong is all of the proprietary protocol nonsense around home entertainment. When I purchased my last TV, I also bought the same manufacturer’s BluRay player in the hope I could get away with one remote and hiding the latter in a closed cabinet. Boy, was I naïve. I finally succumbed to an expensive universal remote and an IR repeater—a brute force approach if there ever was one. This is not IoT; it is the Tyranny of Things."

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French Startup SigFox Has Developed a Wireless Internet Service for Gadgets and Appliances

A startup hopes to connect millions of low-power sensors worldwide to the Internet, making everything—from power grids to home appliances—smarter.


The networks that serve humans are based on technology that isn’t suitable for sensors, says Thomas Nicholls, chief of business development and Internet of Things evangelism at SigFox. “If you compare with a GSM [cell-phone] network, then our solution is much cheaper, provides much lower energy consumption, and operates over a much longer range,” he says.


SigFox builds its networks in the same way as a cellular provider, using a system of connected antennas that each cover a particular area and link back to the operator’s central network. But the antennas use a different radio technology, developed by SigFox, known as ultra narrow band. This technology would not be of much use for streaming video to an iPhone, but it allows devices connecting to the network to consume very little energy, says Nicholls, and it allows for very long-range connections. (...)


SigFox reports seeing most interest in its technology from companies trying to roll out so-called smart grids, an approach to electricity distribution that uses data from sensors throughout a power network—including in customers’ homes—to help improve efficiency and reliability. That tallies with Foster’s experience. “Government stimulus, environmental legislation, and the desire of utilities to increase operational efficiency have been key drivers,” he says.



by Tom Simonite | MIT Technology Review

13 Nov 12


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Neul Raises $5M To Connect The Internet Of Things Using TV White Space

Neul Raises $5M To Connect The Internet Of Things Using TV White Space | Web of Things | Scoop.it

UK-based Neul today announced a new $5 million investment from Mistui & Co. Ltd. subsidiary MGI, as well as existing investors DFJ Esprit, IQ Capital, Business Angels and founding company employees. Neul offers businesses and others a way to create a machine-to-machine (M2M) network using TV signal white space frequencies, which has the advantage of taking bandwidth-heavy, essential communication between devices away from congested frequencies like those used for Wi-Fi and GSM networks. The money will be used to help the firm expand its business, but Neul is more interested in the potential partnerships that investment from Mitsui brings along with it. (...)


Ultimately, what Neul is looking at is the opportunity arising in connected devices, even though other uses include rural broadband (which Neul is actually trialling as well). That focus is designed to capitalize on what Smyth says is a market with a huge amount of growth potential.


“There are all sorts of potential forecasts for M2M growth over the next 10 years or so, and the only thing they have in common is that they all see huge growth,” he said. “One, for example, suggests it’ll be a $150 billion market in the next five years. Another suggests it’ll be that size by 2020. The common theme is that it’ll be huge, probably around one-third the size of the current global mobile market.”


Neul is betting on its Weightless communication standard to define the entire category.

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Ars asks: What home automation project should we tackle?

Ars asks: What home automation project should we tackle? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

For over a decade now, we’ve heard about “The Internet of Things”—the idea that all of my home’s electronics can communicate with each other via the Internet. I’ll be able to control my toaster from my smartphone, or have my washing machine text me when it’s done. But there are relatively few devices out there that can actually do this.


A new Silicon Valley startup is hoping to change all that. Electric Imp is a Wi-Fi chip embedded into a SD-card sized case that is then connected via circuit board to any sort of electronics device. They currently sell “dev kits” for about $20 to $30.


The idea is to make home automation really easy—simple enough for a DIY newbie like me. Electric Imp takes its proprietary hardware and puts on a simplified programming interface, along the lines of Apple’s Automator or IFTTT.

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Why the internet of things needs 'curated openness'

Why the internet of things needs 'curated openness' | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The internet of things is for real, even if it's nowhere near the nirvana of devices that speak with each other and take care of our every waking need automatically.


Speaking Friday at our Mobilize conference in San Francisco, Research in Motion Senior Vice President of BlackBerry OS and QNX Engineering Sebastian Marineau-Mes told the audience that although ubiqutious computing is many people’s ultimate dream in a wireless world, it’s not going to happen without standards that don’t yet exist. Although he painted a beautiful picture of his phone telling his car about a doctor appointment, leading to a chain of automation that included navigation, prescription-filling and his house’s air conditioner kicking on at just the right time as he finally made his way back home, “The big barrier to really achieving this level of integration,” Marineau-Mes said “… is really the interoperability of all these types of data sources.”


And to all the Apple and Android diehards out there, Marineau-Mes said that neither of those platforms are the answer. iOS is too closed, he explained, while Android is so open it tends to create silos of developers who just go off and do their own thing. The answer is something he calls “curated openness” — essentially the standardization of a few core functions to ensure that data can move freely between apps and that apps can move freely across our devices, whether those are phones, tablets, refrigerators or cars.

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Waiting for the Internet of Things – DC Velocity

More than a decade ago, radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology pioneer Kevin Ashton coined the term "Internet of Things." The idea was that every item, product, or "thing" would have a unique identifier just as every computer does on the Internet. RF tags, of course, would provide the means by which these things could be tracked and identified.

 

For logistics managers, the Internet of Things would be a game changer. Among other benefits, it would make it possible to track the flow of goods into and out of a warehouse at the item level. Some retailers and consumer packaged goods manufacturers are already experimenting with item-level tracking. Nonetheless, it appears that the ability to track everything is still several years away.

 

Why? A recent report from Frost & Sullivan ("Analysis of the Active RFID and Sensor Networks Market") offers some insight into the barriers to making the Internet of Things a reality. One of the top challenges, it notes, is getting more companies to buy the type of tags necessary to make this possible. (...)

 

As for why users are shying away from active tags, there are a couple of reasons. First, there's the lack of common industry standards. While passive tags use data standards developed by the EPCglobal consortium, there's no such system in place for active tags. At the moment, makers of active tags use different technology protocols, such as Wi-Fi, Rubee, Zigbee, ultra wide band, infrared, and ultrasound. All of those protocols require different standards, hindering widescale adoption of the technology. (...)

 

Although a standard would hasten the adoption of active tags, there's still another obstacle—cost. Bhattacharya says a passive basic tag goes for $2 to $5 per unit,while an active tag costs between $10 and $15. And that's the low end of the range. If those tags are embedded with sensors and support multiple technologies, the cost of an active tag can top $100 per unit.

 

 

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