Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Energy Harvesting Market - Global Forecast & Analysis (2012 - 2017) - Military & Aerospace Electronics

Energy Harvesting Market - Global Forecast & Analysis (2012 - 2017) - Military & Aerospace Electronics | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Energy harvesting is the process of collecting the ambient energy from the surroundings like light, heat, vibration, and electromagnetic radiation, and converting it into usable electrical energy for power portable electrical devices; this can be done without using the batteries. This technology efficiently collects the ambient energy that we usually discard and merits a lot of attention. It is also known as energy scavenging or power scavenging. Energy harvesting market covers the various sources of energy harvesting that are used by the energy harvesting technologies.


This report describes the different energy harvesting technologies such as light energy harvesting, thermoelectric, vibration, electromagnetic, fluid, motion, and other types like RF and bio energy harvesting. In the overall market for energy harvesting, light harvesting contributes for the largest percentage share, due to the availability of huge source of solar energy. This report forecasts the energy harvesting technologies market from 2012 to 2017.

 

The report :http://bit.ly/ScijQd

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Leaf-Mimicking Solar Cells Generate 47% More Electricity

Leaf-Mimicking Solar Cells Generate 47% More Electricity | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Plastic solar cells are tough, flexible, bendable and cheap. They have a wide-range of potential applications, but their biggest downfall is that they're much less efficient than conventional silicon cells. A team at UCLA was recently able to achieve an efficiency of 10.6 percent, which put the cells into the 10 - 15 percent efficiency range considered necessary for commercialization. The Princeton teams expects that their leaf-mimicking design could push that efficiency even further because the method can be applied to almost any plastic material.

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