Web of Things
13.1K views | +0 today
Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Cyber Security in the Internet of Things

Cyber Security in the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Why do we say IoT requires new thinking about cyber security? Mainly because of the level of data sharing involved. This is a fast-evolving feature of the IoT, around which industrial equipment markets have not yet aligned. Note that we can trace the origins of the IoT to the early efforts by engineers in Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to find ways to monitor, objectively and in real time, how the machines they designed for customers actually performed in the real word. They tended to use the terms telematics and mobile resource management. Soon, however, it became clear how valuable such data would be to their colleagues in product marketing, and in turn to customer service and technical support. As for the customers themselves, they received some benefits, such as maintenance alerts but, generally speaking, they had access to little real-time data, and it was difficult to work with when they did get it.

 

Today, growing numbers of customers recognize how that data could inform their own operations, and even feel it is rightfully theirs, leading to battles over who owns and has access to what data, who is responsible for securing it, and a long list of other related questions. What's more, as systems built by different OEMs interact, there is infighting among them as to what constitutes sensitive or competitive intelligence. Simultaneously, everyone must address the question of how shared access to data exposes them to new legal liabilities with their trading partners.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Digital Footprint
Scoop.it!

Why London's Police Just Set a Horrifying Precedent on Mobile Privacy

Why London's Police Just Set a Horrifying Precedent on Mobile Privacy | Web of Things | Scoop.it
London's Metropolitan Police recently started using machines that allow law enforcement to tap into any mobile device and download call registers, photographs, videos, SMS, email and even social networking data in under 20 minutes.

Via Peter Vander Auwera
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

How the Internet of Things could change Australian homes and businesses

Many of the barriers to adopting the Internet of Things in the home revolve around design issues. For example, Williams says a substantial amount of intelligence is required to enable alerts to be sent when the user wants to receive them – not when the events actually occur. (...)

 

The Internet of Things not only has potential in the home, but businesses could also benefit from it to find out what is happening in real time. For example, it could be used to track the exact location of parcels or drivers. (...)

 

Google has already made a move into this area, with the release in June this year of Google Maps Coordinate which allows businesses to track exactly where employees are located through Google Maps. (...)

 

There are numerous issues around privacy and security. For example, allowing a fridge to connect to the internet could create potential holes for hackers to get into personal networks. How readily consumers will accept these potential invasions of privacy remain to be seen, Williams says, but a tightening of online security will help.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

‘Smart Cities’ On The Increase, Despite Obstacles And Risks | Risk Watchdog

The establishment of ‘smart cities’ globally is being driven by the growing need to augment/automate a wide range of legacy productivity, distribution, and consumption platforms.


Current and forecast population growth and urbanisation trends demand the creation of hundreds of new cities – or new communities within existing cities – over the next couple of decades, and this is an ideal time to develop, test and implement new technologies to replace outmoded and inefficient platforms.


...

 

But, security and data privacy are treated as an after-thought. Somebody else’s problem, effectively, according to several people I spoke to. This is worrying if the majority of systems are to be routinely deeply interconnected in the future. A simple virus could shut off the national grid, crash aircraft, or send nuclear reactors critical.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Commission consults on rules for the ‘Internet of Things’

Realising the enormous economic and societal potential of the IoT requires a level playing field where all players can compete on an equal footing, without gate keepers and locked-in users.

 

Its societal acceptance requires the definition of an ethical and legal framework, supported by technology and providing people with control and security.

 

Through the consultation, the Commission is seeking views on privacy, safety and security, security of critical IoT supported infrastructure, ethics, interoperability, governance and standards.

 

The Internet of today offers access to content and information through connection to web pages from multiple terminals like PCs, smart phones or TVs.

 

The next evolution will make it possible to access information related to the physical environment through connected objects capable of sensing the environment and communicating through smart chips using Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) with or without human intervention.

 

by Enterprise Europe Network

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Dual RFID-ZigBee sensors to enable NFC applications for the Internet of Things | ECN: Electronic Component News

Zaragoza, Spain-based Libelium has launched a new RFID/NFC module for its Waspmote sensor platform. The new radio module extends Waspmote features allowing the sensor data to be used in Location Based Services (LBS), such as asset tracking, supply chain monitoring, intelligent shopping or access management.

 

By using RFID/NFC (passive sensors) along with ZigBee (active sensors), Libelium says asset tracking can be more accurate than ever along the whole supply chain process. Product management software such as ERPs will have access in real time to information related to remaining stock, storage and transportation conditions (temperature and humidity levels, vibrations, light exposure, etc), expiration dates and even consumer profiles, knowing time spent in front of a shelf or products picked up and not bought.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher

CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, Petraeus mused about the emergence of an “Internet of Things” — that is, wired devices — at a summit for In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm. “‘Transformational’ is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies,” Petraeus enthused, “particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft.”

 

All those new online devices are a treasure trove of data if you’re a “person of interest” to the spy community. Once upon a time, spies had to place a bug in your chandelier to hear your conversation. With the rise of the “smart home,” you’d be sending tagged, geolocated data that a spy agency can intercept in real time when you use the lighting app on your phone to adjust your living room’s ambiance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Easier, better identitiy on the horizon

Easier, better identitiy on the horizon | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Together, three trends lead to an Internet of Things, where smart phones use NFC to make statements about the physical world. For example, there has already been an art exhibition that lets visitors vote for their favorite display by tapping with their smartphone. But more importantly, there’s an Internet of Secure Things coming. You will be able to use your smartphone to badge in to work, unlock your PC, start your car or motorcycle (the prototype of that is already working), as well as merely pay for things.

 

It isn’t going to all happen in 2012, but we are likely to look back at 2012 as the year when it took off."

 

By Jon Callas, CTO, Entrust One - on the confluence of few major trends.

 

SecureIDNews 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Duncan Jefferies: How the 'internet of things' could radically change local government

"The IoT is linked to a number of other emerging ideas, such as smart cities, pervasive sensing and machine-to-machine communication – all of which are being tentatively explored by businesses and government. Regardless of what name it is given, this merger of the physical and virtual worlds could allow local authorities to deliver much more efficient services, reducing waste and unlocking reams of useful data: think water mains loaded with clusters of sensors that can alert engineers to leaks or blockages, or lampposts that can detect light levels and save energy by turning themselves off. Sensors could even be used to check the effectiveness of waste removal and recycling services, or help the police locate stolen goods."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Authenticate or Die - Forbes

Authenticate or Die - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet:

"That anonymity—one of the few serious flaws in the design of the Internet—is giving the bad guys plenty of cover and keeping society as a whole from fully benefiting from what the Internet has to offer.

 

And this situation is only going to get worse as we move to what’s been dubbed the “Internet of Things.”

 

It’s a world where the line between what’s a computer and what’s not a computer gets increasingly blurred, and every device we have looks, smells, and behaves more and more like a computer. The smartphone is the most obvious example, but now you can add things such as cars, medical devices, household appliances, almost every device in your a/v cabinet and more. Increasingly, the things in our everyday infrastructure are gaining the intelligence and the processing power of computers, which means they’re also vulnerable to attack."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Smart Grid Offers a Glimpse into the Internet of Things

The Smart Grid Offers a Glimpse into the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Smart Grid deployments are not only delivering improved energy security, grid reliability, and consumer control to us, they are bringing the Internet of Things closer to reality. The Internet of Things (IoT) is defined in the Smart Grid Dictionary as a conceptual description of the ability to connect any objects with an IP address and some level of embedded intelligence to the communications network. Embedded intelligence can include localization, sensing, identification, security, networking, processing, and control."

 

by Christine Hertzog

---

image from Consumer Energy Report http://goo.gl/xzLyl

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

"Internet of things" to give $10-15 trillion boost to global economy

"Internet of things" to give $10-15 trillion boost to global economy | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Productivity gains resulting from the “internet of things” could add between $10 trillion and $15 trillion to global GDP over the next 20 years, according to a new study from General Electric (GE).


The manufacturing giant reckons the “industrial internet”, as it terms the phenomenon, could find direct application in sectors accounting for more than $32.3 trillion in global economic activity, but expects this figure to reach about $82 trillion – one half of global economic output – by 2025. (...)


... it acknowledges that if its vision is to become reality there needs to be a sustained effort in technological innovation, with considerable investments in the deployment of the necessary sensors, instrumentation and user-interface systems.


GE also calls for a robust cyber security system and greater protection of sensitive information and intellectual property, as well as the development of talent and creation of so-called “cross-cutting roles” that combine mechanical and industrial engineering.


GE | TelecomEngine.com

Iain Morris
27 Nov 2012


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data

When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

They're in vending machines, parking meters, home security systems, and even healthcare devices for the elderly. They are wireless sensors, a key component of the burgeoning machine-to-machine (M2M) industry where devices use wired and wireless connections to communicate with each other. Though far from new, M2M technology is expanding its reach at a dramatic rate.

 

M2M connections will grow to 2.1 billion by 2021, up from roughly 100 million last year, according to research firm Analysis Mason. The dramatic growth of global smartphone usage is a major factor in M2M's popularity, of course, as are industrial applications in the transportation, emergency services, security, and retail sectors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Web of Things | Scoop.it

China, Japan and the European Union all invest about €1 billion a year in the Internet of Things; it is not known how much the US spends but the country also tags, scans and monitors goods and services. "The question of whether this is a desirable development or not is no longer relevant, the technology is there and we're using it," says IT specialist Arjan Geurts of Twynstra Gudde Advice Bureau.

 

The technical problems have been solved; an RFID or Radio Frequency Identification tag costs just five cents and wireless internet is in the ascendancy. The amount of information being sent is relatively small, which means there is very little chance of overloading the internet connection. Geurts: "the advent of the smartphone is the motor driving technological developments."

 

...

 

Asia is in the vanguard when it comes to the Internet of Things. Van 't Hof: "Chinese and Japanese users have integrated the technology very harmoniously. When China introduced electronic licence plates in order to monitor and regulate traffic, the authorities feared it would lead to riots as the technology could be used to restrict freedom of movement. However, there were no protests once the advantages of the system were explained and assurances about data accumulation were given. Transparency was the key."

 

...

 

The privacy issues don't worry companies very much, but security is very much an issue. Jaap-Henk Hoepman, a computer security and privacy expert attached to Radboud University in Nijmegen, says, "If something goes wrong, the damage is enormous. A company could be stuck with an entire shipment of perishable goods if the tracking system goes down or could be hit by digital industrial espionage."

 

"But that's no reason not to go ahead. We have to be aware of the risks. About 90 percent of the applications for this technology haven't even been thought of yet. And there will certainly be ways to use the technology that will make us wonder how we ever survived without them."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Services from healthcare to energy will change over the next decade as machine-to-machine communication facilitates more sophisticated automation.

 

The shift will be led by a combination of improved network communication, smaller and lower cost embedded devices and the development of common standards.

 

However, privacy, security and the risk of network congestion will need to be overcome, while technology standards and streamlined regulations are also a prerequisite.

 

These claims are made in a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), entitled Rise of the Machines

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

European Commission gets interested in the Internet of Things

The European Commission wants to find out whether there is enough of a business case for a single firm to exploit the market. In the commission's statement of intent it said it wants to find out about privacy, security and safety and whether societial acceptance requires ethical and legal frameworks to be put into place.

 

The commission is right in treating the Internet of Things seriously. While the term might be something of a marketer's delight, the underlying principles behind it are extremely powerful and could generate a lot of money for private companies, which typically means that users' and public interests are sacrificed on the altar of profits.

Source: The Inquirer (http://s.tt/19dZS)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Qualcomm Atheros joins Internet of Things with tiny comms chip

Qualcomm Atheros joins Internet of Things with tiny comms chip | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Qualcomm Atheros has jumped onto the Internet of Things bandwagon with a new chipset, the AR4100P, intended to give your washing machine, lighting and just about anything else a direct line to the web.

 

Qualcomm Atheros calls its line-up of products for the segment its “Internet of Everything portfolio” and expects it to find buyers among smart energy providers, those creating products for the “intelligent home”, in security and building automation, for remote health and wellness monitoring, and more.

 

via SlashGear

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

'A new forensics': adapting to changing digital crimes

'A new forensics': adapting to changing digital crimes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"The number of wireless devices continues to grow into a large ‘Internet of things’. When searching a desk, we now have to grab the desktop computer but also look out for USB drives disguised as pens, digital cameras disguised as tissue boxes and a myriad of MP3 players, smart phones and other devices. Never has there been so much data and so many different ways to hide it."

 

- SMT Online - Security industry news and information

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Where objects talk and humans watch

"Given how connected the world would become, shoelaces could talk to wardrobes, cars could set appointments with mechanics themselves, and stores could tell you what would be appropriate for you, based on your past purchase preferences."

 

"Analysts predict the phenomenon to gain widespread attention within the next few years, and the world to be ‘taken over’ in just a decade. Soon enough, IoT-related privacy will become an issue and the inevitable threat of hackers will emerge (in a connected world, they could be infinitely more dangerous than in The Net)."

 

via DAWN.COM Blog

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Lockheed Martin Launches Wireless Sensor Network System for Surveillance Operations

"US-based security company Lockheed Martin has launched a new wireless sensor network system called the Self-Powered Ad-hoc Network (SPAN) which consists of ground sensors. The sensors are small and can be easily camouflaged according to the surroundings thus enabling continuous surveillance of the secured area."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Things: The Opportunity of a Lifetime?

The Internet of Things: The Opportunity of a Lifetime? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"The "Internet of Things" is a term that describes the many objects in the physical world that are now connected to the web. It also describes an industry that is expected to earn mobile device operators nearly $1.2 trillion in revenue by 2020.

 

When discussing The "Internet of Things" we refer to connected devices that are part of systems tuned into larger systems, or information bases, that the Internet offers. The devices "talk" with each other, exchanging services and data. Such connected devises range from smartphones and tablets, to TVs and DVD players, security systems, GPS and tracking systems, and much more."

more...
No comment yet.