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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Cyber Security in the Internet of Things

Cyber Security in the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Why do we say IoT requires new thinking about cyber security? Mainly because of the level of data sharing involved. This is a fast-evolving feature of the IoT, around which industrial equipment markets have not yet aligned. Note that we can trace the origins of the IoT to the early efforts by engineers in Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to find ways to monitor, objectively and in real time, how the machines they designed for customers actually performed in the real word. They tended to use the terms telematics and mobile resource management. Soon, however, it became clear how valuable such data would be to their colleagues in product marketing, and in turn to customer service and technical support. As for the customers themselves, they received some benefits, such as maintenance alerts but, generally speaking, they had access to little real-time data, and it was difficult to work with when they did get it.

 

Today, growing numbers of customers recognize how that data could inform their own operations, and even feel it is rightfully theirs, leading to battles over who owns and has access to what data, who is responsible for securing it, and a long list of other related questions. What's more, as systems built by different OEMs interact, there is infighting among them as to what constitutes sensitive or competitive intelligence. Simultaneously, everyone must address the question of how shared access to data exposes them to new legal liabilities with their trading partners.

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Too many obstacles to 'smart homes' anytime soon: Pew Research

A lot of the elements of the much-anticipated “smart home” will be arriving on the scene by 2020, but the idea of a very smart, well-connected house may still be quite a ways off. That’s the takeaway from a new survey of 1,021 Internet experts, researchers, observers, and critics, released by the Pew Research Center. Respondents are fairly evenly split between those who agreed that energy- and money-saving "smart systems" will be significantly closer to reality in people's homes by 2020 and those who said such homes will still remain a “marketing mirage.”


Some 51% agreed with the statement that by 2020, “the connected household has become a model of efficiency, as people are able to manage consumption of resources (electricity, water, food, even bandwidth) in ways that place less of a burden on the environment while saving households money.”


via SmartPlanet.com (blog)


Via Richard Kastelein
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‘Smart Cities’ On The Increase, Despite Obstacles And Risks | Risk Watchdog

The establishment of ‘smart cities’ globally is being driven by the growing need to augment/automate a wide range of legacy productivity, distribution, and consumption platforms.


Current and forecast population growth and urbanisation trends demand the creation of hundreds of new cities – or new communities within existing cities – over the next couple of decades, and this is an ideal time to develop, test and implement new technologies to replace outmoded and inefficient platforms.


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But, security and data privacy are treated as an after-thought. Somebody else’s problem, effectively, according to several people I spoke to. This is worrying if the majority of systems are to be routinely deeply interconnected in the future. A simple virus could shut off the national grid, crash aircraft, or send nuclear reactors critical.

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Dooming scenario

Dooming scenario | Web of Things | Scoop.it

In another scenario, where we can recognize a seamless network “of things” (Rob Van Kranenbrug, Internet of Things) – of cars, of cities, of washing machines communicating – the idea is to leave this network open, and not enclosed in the hands of one middleman, one government, or one or two states (and Moglen will use examples of USA and China), that can choose to act in their un-wisdom. Moglen argues, in a dooming scenario where big data is collected about each citizen, that “we need to reposses the web away from the man in the middle.” Otherwise, our memories will become inferior to this “big data” because what is collected will not be forgotten. “Media consumes us”, he concludes, “watching us watching it,” and the freedom of thought may be lost forever if there wasn't anyone left running free software, securing free (un-surveilled) media, leaving the seamless network – open.

 

In my view, the central question was revolving around the ways of securing our own autonomy[...]

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Would you please tell your Internet of things to shut up

Would you please tell your Internet of things to shut up | Web of Things | Scoop.it

When our lamps are constantly telling us they’ve been left on and doors incessantly update us when they’ve been unlocked, we will get bombarded with information. While that info at times is quite useful, it has the potential to become just a stream of noise. By telling us everything about our homes, cars and appliances the Internet of things may wind up telling nothing at all.

 

“I still want to be in control, but I don’t need every piece of information,” Anneroth said. “The Internet of things needs to keep me in the loop but not all of the time.”

 

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Technology Strategy Board invests in Internet of Things

Technology Strategy Board invests in Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Graham Fisher, a Director at Cambridge Wireless, welcomed the efforts made by the Technology Strategy Board. He told TechEye that there are plenty of opportunities to be had with an Internet of Things, though there is more that needs to be done in terms of infrastructure in order to create the ecosystem the TSB is striving for.


“Rural connectivity could be an issue as it is necessary that ubiquitous internet is available in order to create efficient systems,” Fisher told TechEye. “For efficient telehealth and smart metering this all falls down if you are not able to provide ubiquitous connections.”


Then again, there are "problems with a lack of full connections in many parts of the country,” Fisher says. “We need to push forward with the roll out of LTE and use of white spaces as soon as possible to support this.”

 

Read more: http://news.techeye.net/internet/technology-strategy-board-invests-in-internet-of-things#ixzz1jZkvlAJz"

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10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you

10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"These days, Big Brother doesn't need to do much snooping. We just tell him what we're up to. We tweet, check in on Foursquare, use digital payment systems and generally live so publicly that spying loses at least some degree of utility.


Meanwhile, we're quickly expanding the systems we've built to monitor ourselves and our environments. We connect our power consumption to the internet via "smart meters," we let Google's cameras map our streets and we use wireless gadgets to transmit vital signs to doctors."

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“Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation,” by B. Coleman

“Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation,” by B. Coleman | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"In her new book, “Hello Avatar,” artist and media theorist B. Coleman looks at the same virtual terrain and sees, rather than impoverishment and imaginative constriction, increasing personal agency, and even fulfillment."

 

"Faster than we realize the physical world is coming online. “Whether it is with RFID tags or another kind of sensor,” Coleman writes, “one finds information systems that, in real-time, track objects whose presence can be read by satellite, radio or scanner.” Media theorists use the term “social objects” for these in-building climatic sensors, GPS-equipped cars and phones, and an array of other trackable consumer products, and consider them part of a burgeoning “Internet of Things” that monitors energy use and geographic locations — the objects’ own and ours as well. And here lie more dystopian possibilities: “At what point do our ‘smart’ houses, cars, and appliances begin to report on our behavior?” she asks. “The risk lies in the prospect that as the thing becomes sensible, the human subject, as a subject of a network culture, becomes more thing-like.” She believes such fates can be mitigated if designers can make media technologies that are more transparent to us than we are to them."

 

via washingtonpost.com

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Authenticate or Die - Forbes

Authenticate or Die - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet:

"That anonymity—one of the few serious flaws in the design of the Internet—is giving the bad guys plenty of cover and keeping society as a whole from fully benefiting from what the Internet has to offer.

 

And this situation is only going to get worse as we move to what’s been dubbed the “Internet of Things.”

 

It’s a world where the line between what’s a computer and what’s not a computer gets increasingly blurred, and every device we have looks, smells, and behaves more and more like a computer. The smartphone is the most obvious example, but now you can add things such as cars, medical devices, household appliances, almost every device in your a/v cabinet and more. Increasingly, the things in our everyday infrastructure are gaining the intelligence and the processing power of computers, which means they’re also vulnerable to attack."

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We can't let the Internet of Things become the Tyranny of Things

We can't let the Internet of Things become the Tyranny of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things isn’t just some futuristic concept — it already exists. But often badly. For it to succeed, it will need an economy supported by developers who can rely on open standards and APIs.

 

"oT done wrong is the much maligned Internet refrigerator. Seriously? People have been talking about this dog for years now and seemingly every year some earnest manufacturer actually demonstrates yet another realization of this dubious vision, which usually consists of little more than a screen stuck onto the door like some giant fridge magnet. This is IoT designed by a committee.

 

IoT done wrong is all of the proprietary protocol nonsense around home entertainment. When I purchased my last TV, I also bought the same manufacturer’s BluRay player in the hope I could get away with one remote and hiding the latter in a closed cabinet. Boy, was I naïve. I finally succumbed to an expensive universal remote and an IR repeater—a brute force approach if there ever was one. This is not IoT; it is the Tyranny of Things."

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The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Web of Things | Scoop.it

China, Japan and the European Union all invest about €1 billion a year in the Internet of Things; it is not known how much the US spends but the country also tags, scans and monitors goods and services. "The question of whether this is a desirable development or not is no longer relevant, the technology is there and we're using it," says IT specialist Arjan Geurts of Twynstra Gudde Advice Bureau.

 

The technical problems have been solved; an RFID or Radio Frequency Identification tag costs just five cents and wireless internet is in the ascendancy. The amount of information being sent is relatively small, which means there is very little chance of overloading the internet connection. Geurts: "the advent of the smartphone is the motor driving technological developments."

 

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Asia is in the vanguard when it comes to the Internet of Things. Van 't Hof: "Chinese and Japanese users have integrated the technology very harmoniously. When China introduced electronic licence plates in order to monitor and regulate traffic, the authorities feared it would lead to riots as the technology could be used to restrict freedom of movement. However, there were no protests once the advantages of the system were explained and assurances about data accumulation were given. Transparency was the key."

 

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The privacy issues don't worry companies very much, but security is very much an issue. Jaap-Henk Hoepman, a computer security and privacy expert attached to Radboud University in Nijmegen, says, "If something goes wrong, the damage is enormous. A company could be stuck with an entire shipment of perishable goods if the tracking system goes down or could be hit by digital industrial espionage."

 

"But that's no reason not to go ahead. We have to be aware of the risks. About 90 percent of the applications for this technology haven't even been thought of yet. And there will certainly be ways to use the technology that will make us wonder how we ever survived without them."

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Data Culture #3: Tacocopter and the digital creep

Data Culture #3: Tacocopter and the digital creep | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The digital age right now is at a point where it can log our lives in real time, know our location, recognise our face, then decipher our emotions. Tech will decide if you are looking criminal or even hungry and it will dispatch the appropriate robot to deal with you – bad luck if you get Robocop, better luck if the Tacocopter turns up.

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I've mentioned the partnership between IBM and the Louvre before but it takes on new relevance here. In essence they have created a smart building, transforming the very walls of the building into data collectors. The Louvre, in a sense, has had an Operating System installed.

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Art, of course, deals with issues around identity. Tech companies know concepts like the Internet of Things challenge our sense of who we are as individuals and collectives – for that reason, I think art should be part of the argument.

 

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Patrick Hussey is digital campaigns manager at Arts & Business – follow him on Twitter @arts_business and @PatrickRiot

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European Commission gets interested in the Internet of Things

The European Commission wants to find out whether there is enough of a business case for a single firm to exploit the market. In the commission's statement of intent it said it wants to find out about privacy, security and safety and whether societial acceptance requires ethical and legal frameworks to be put into place.

 

The commission is right in treating the Internet of Things seriously. While the term might be something of a marketer's delight, the underlying principles behind it are extremely powerful and could generate a lot of money for private companies, which typically means that users' and public interests are sacrificed on the altar of profits.

Source: The Inquirer (http://s.tt/19dZS)
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'A new forensics': adapting to changing digital crimes

'A new forensics': adapting to changing digital crimes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"The number of wireless devices continues to grow into a large ‘Internet of things’. When searching a desk, we now have to grab the desktop computer but also look out for USB drives disguised as pens, digital cameras disguised as tissue boxes and a myriad of MP3 players, smart phones and other devices. Never has there been so much data and so many different ways to hide it."

 

- SMT Online - Security industry news and information

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The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner?

The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Not everyone is looking forward to this with open arms however, for the same reasons people are against ID cards, and have rightfully suspicious views of centralised data. Not everyone wants their underpants to beam their movements directly to the government or their spouse. Throwing a surprise party? Forget it. Hide-and-seek? Out of the question.


‘Everyday objects are increasingly going to become gateways to services beyond the objects themselves.’ says Nathan Miller, Insight Curator for Crayon consumer insight agency.. ‘Having ‘smart objects’ make decisions for us could be dangerous. However, as these objects and technologies become more accessible, it’s almost certain that many of us will find ways to control our own data. The centralisation, control and freeness of our data is a choice of design rather than a requirement of technology.’"

 

via HumansInvent.com

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net.wars: Location, location, location

"Blaine Price, a senior lecturer in computing at the Open University, had this cheering thought: as humans become part of the Internet of Things, data leakage will become almost impossible to avoid.

 

Network externalities mean that the number of people using a network increase its value for all other users of that network. What about privacy externalities?"

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Where objects talk and humans watch

"Given how connected the world would become, shoelaces could talk to wardrobes, cars could set appointments with mechanics themselves, and stores could tell you what would be appropriate for you, based on your past purchase preferences."

 

"Analysts predict the phenomenon to gain widespread attention within the next few years, and the world to be ‘taken over’ in just a decade. Soon enough, IoT-related privacy will become an issue and the inevitable threat of hackers will emerge (in a connected world, they could be infinitely more dangerous than in The Net)."

 

via DAWN.COM Blog

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