Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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The quantified self movement: some sociological perspectives

The quantified self movement: some sociological perspectives | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The concepts of ‘self-tracking’ and the ‘quantified self’ have recently begun to emerge in discussions of how best to optimise one’s life. These concepts refer to the practice of gathering data about onself on a regular basis and then recording andanalyzing the data to produce statistics and graphs relating to one's bodily functions, diet, illness symptoms, apperance, social encounters, phone calls, work output, computer use, mood andmany more aspects of everyday life. (...)


These technologies include not only digital cameras, smartphones and tablet computers, but also wearable wristbands, headbands or patches with digital technologies embedded in their fabric able to measure bodily functions or movement and upload data wirelessly. Tiny sensors can also be incorporated into everyday items such as toothbrushes, pyjamas or watering cans to measure such activities. Blood pressure cuffs and body weight scales can be purchased that connect wirelessly to apps. Global positioning devices and accelerometers in mobile devices provide spatial location and quantify movement. Apps that regularly ask users to document their mood can monitor affective states. There seems hardly a limit to the ways in which one’s daily activities can be monitored, measured and quantified. Some committed self-trackers even regularly send stool and blood samples for analysis and use commercially available genetic tests as part of their efforts to construct a detailed map of their bodily functions and wellbeing.


by sociologist Deborah Lupton

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Big Data in Your Blood

Big Data in Your Blood | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Sensors of your heart, blood, and brain are coming to market. These may be a boon to science and personal health. For the companies involved, they may be goldmines of intimate real-time data on millions of subjects.


Later this year, a Boston-based company called MC10 will offer the first of several “stretchable electronics” products that can be put on things like shirts and shoes, worn as temporary tattoos or installed in the body. These will be capable of measuring not just heart rate, the company says, but brain activity, body temperature and hydration levels. Another company, called Proteus, will begin a pilot program in Britain for a “Digital Health Feedback System” that combines both wearable technologies and microchips the size of a sand grain that ride a pill right through you. Powered by your stomach fluids, it emits a signal picked up by an external sensor, capturing vital data. Another firm, Sano Intelligence, is looking at micro needle sensors on skin patches as a way of deriving continuous information about the bloodstream.

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Build your strategy around the future

Build your strategy around the future | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Technology will ride to the rescue (well, sort of). Faith in technology can easily bleed into science fiction. But in 2012, the "internet of things", the "quantified self", and "augmented reality" will ensure that we have the information we need to achieve massive reductions of our footprint as individuals and institutions. And increased visibility into the sustainability attributes of everyday products will benefit companies that take this seriously, and leave others behind."

 

via Guardian.co.uk

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Fitbit Ultra

Fitbit Ultra | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Fitbit has been a star in the wearable fitness tracker scene for quite some time. No wonder - it was one of the first devices that was small and pretty enough to be worn around the clock and it is able to track both activity and sleep.


Fitbit’s strength is that its functionalities are very simple due to the single-button control. Each press of the button cycles the display (OLED) through one of six modes (steps, distance, floors climbed, calories burned, flower (overall recent activity level and clock). Yet the device collects an immense amount of data that can nicely be viewed in several Fitbit apps or the Fitbit web application. Additionally, even more details can be logged, such as individual foods and workouts from your smart phone or computer. And weight and other health indicators such as blood pressure, glucose, and heart rate can be included as well.


via wearable-technologies.com

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Tracking everything, Placeme is the smartphone assistant of the future

Tracking everything, Placeme is the smartphone assistant of the future | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Placeme for iOS and Android may be both the scariest and amazingly futuristic app I've seen yet. The free software uses every sensor in your handset to track your activities, location and environment.
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The Growing Hipness of Mobile Wellness

The Growing Hipness of Mobile Wellness | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Your mobile wireless carrier may soon have a say in the way you think about health and wellness. AT&T, through its Emerging Devices unit, plans to offer for sale health-tracking clothing equipped with wireless sensors that enable you to track your heart rate, body temperature and other vital signs -- and then send all this data to a site where a physician can access it. The first offering will be a version of the E39 body compression shirt, originally designed by Under Armour for the NFL scouting combines and other world-class athletic competitions. Now imagine yourself as a high-performance weekend athlete, effortlessly transmitting your heart rate, skin temperature and activity levels to the Web"

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