Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Application platforms, big data and collaborations are IoT enablers

Application platforms, big data and collaborations are IoT enablers | Web of Things | Scoop.it

An analyst's view: The IoT can be characterised as an ever-expanding universe of connected things, and to guide companies through this system, identifying specific collaboration partners within a specific topic area is a wise starting point.

. . . 

IoT requires quicker application development platforms to address the growing requirements of enterprises in maximising the benefits in this market opportunity, and at the same time, IoT needs to be enabled by scalable application management platforms, handling the new volumes of data and applications.


To be able to handle these volumes of data, M2M and IoT service enablement and application platforms as well as associated databases and analytical tools will need to be highly scalable, and sufficiently agile and flexible to manage the heterogeneity in data types and structures.

. . .

In reflecting the texture and attributes of IoT, ‘Subnets of Things’ will remain scalable, agile and flexible, constantly evolving and creating (or re-creating) new and exciting business relationships and partnerships between diverse set of stakeholders.

 

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Here's what one venture capitalist seeks from the Internet of things

Here's what one venture capitalist seeks from the Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Barry Eggers, an investor at Lightspeed Venture Partners, is trying to piece together growth opportunities in the emerging Internet of things, and while he can't be sure, he's got some ideas.

 

Data scientists, entrepreneurs, and IT analysts have great hopes for the Internet of things. One analyst recently declared 2014 to be the year when IT buyers focus more on the Internet of things.

 

In line with the much parroted software-is-eating-the-world logic, Eggers is betting that the control point will turn out to be in a person’s phone rather than on a separate, wholly new device for the home.

“The penetration of smartphones is pretty high,” he said. “… Why isn’t the control point just your mobile phone? It has all the radios in it that you need. It has all of the software you need.” It’s reasonable to think of them as a solid landing pad for all the data and analytics from the Internet of things devices a person owns or uses.

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Faceless sensors and tiny routers needed for the internet of things

Faceless sensors and tiny routers needed for the internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Connecting sensors as well as connected devices to build an Internet of things-style service isn’t easy. But new products from vendors that range from Texas Instruments to ThingsSquared and Mobiplug make it easier for product vendors and consumers to build internets of things.

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This Tiny Gizmo Could Be A Very Big Deal In 2013 - And Beyond

This Tiny Gizmo Could Be A Very Big Deal In 2013 - And Beyond | Web of Things | Scoop.it
A $70 gizmo from Leap Motion could change the way we interact with computers - and eventually, lots of other things, too.


Wired called this "the best gesture-control system we've ever tested." The Verge called it "the next big thing in computing."


Leap Motion has already received preorders worth tens of millions of dollars, says Andy Miller, the company’s president and COO. (...)


Because Leap Motion has big plans. Laptops and desktops are just the start. “The consumer is side a way of getting it out there, but the bigger business might be licensing deals,” Miller says. “We have been contacted by thousands of businesses that want to use this.”


He reels off potential applications that range from robotic surgery to fighter jets, from semiconductor clean rooms to fast-food restaurant kitchens. “We’ve talked about seatback screens on planes,” he says. “Climate control systems. Set-top boxes and TVs and remote controls. Tablets. MRIs.”


McDonald’s and Jack in the Box like the idea of putting Leap Motion controllers in their kitchens so that workers can manipulate screens without having to touch them.


Others want to use Leap Motion in casinos, nightclubs and DJ booths to let people control huge video boards.


“This is a big thing that really could change the way we interact with devices,” Miller says.


Dan Lyons / read write 

24 Dec 2012



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When augmented reality hits the Internet of Things (Wired UK)

When augmented reality hits the Internet of Things  (Wired UK) | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Wired.co.uk examines how augmented reality and The Internet of Things -- both hotly tipped computing trends -- could impact each other in the coming years

Where they intersect could be an engrossing area -- with the visual and location-based aspect of augmented reality providing a real-time, real-place interface for the data being pumped out by objects. We’d be able to see not just whether a bus is behind a building but how many people are on it, whether it’s on time, where people are sitting on the bus, what the name of driver is and well, any other information you decided to put out there.

Currently AR is interesting, yes, but slightly random and patchy. With AR plus the Internet of Things, he could check out different temperatures in different parts of a building, track any given object or person and see or hear what was going on behind walls -- provided the right chips and sensors were in place.

It will allow us to engage much more deeply with what’s around us. Scanning down a street we could see which restaurants are full, which have seats, which shops have that game/coat we want in stock or where our friends are. Other applications for this engaging technology are likely to be games, or maybe training exercises because it’s engrossing and fast-moving.

14 Oct 2010
Anna Leach
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More on AR developments via Web of Things scoop.it.

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French Startup SigFox Has Developed a Wireless Internet Service for Gadgets and Appliances

A startup hopes to connect millions of low-power sensors worldwide to the Internet, making everything—from power grids to home appliances—smarter.


The networks that serve humans are based on technology that isn’t suitable for sensors, says Thomas Nicholls, chief of business development and Internet of Things evangelism at SigFox. “If you compare with a GSM [cell-phone] network, then our solution is much cheaper, provides much lower energy consumption, and operates over a much longer range,” he says.


SigFox builds its networks in the same way as a cellular provider, using a system of connected antennas that each cover a particular area and link back to the operator’s central network. But the antennas use a different radio technology, developed by SigFox, known as ultra narrow band. This technology would not be of much use for streaming video to an iPhone, but it allows devices connecting to the network to consume very little energy, says Nicholls, and it allows for very long-range connections. (...)


SigFox reports seeing most interest in its technology from companies trying to roll out so-called smart grids, an approach to electricity distribution that uses data from sensors throughout a power network—including in customers’ homes—to help improve efficiency and reliability. That tallies with Foster’s experience. “Government stimulus, environmental legislation, and the desire of utilities to increase operational efficiency have been key drivers,” he says.



by Tom Simonite | MIT Technology Review

13 Nov 12


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Open.Sen.se Beta

Open.Sen.se Beta | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Open.Sen.se is an open platform for all those who want to imagine, prototype and test new Devices, Installations, Scenarios, Applications for this globally interconnected and immersive world. Designers, developers, tinkerers, students, hobbyists, R&D departments, artists, self quantifiers, dataviz maniacs, whatever your skills are, we tried to make Open.Sen.se easy to use and yet powerful for you. Needless to say Open.Sen.se is free.

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Scottish scientists build search engine for 'Internet of Things'

Scottish scientists build search engine for 'Internet of Things' | Web of Things | Scoop.it

By collating data from sensors such as cameras and microphones, and cross-referencing it with results from social networks such as Twitter, users will be able to receive detailed responses to questions such as ‘What part of the city hosts live music events that my friends have been to recently?' and ‘How busy is the city centre?'

 

[...]

 

"SMART builds upon the existing concept of ‘smart cities', physical spaces which are covered in an array of intelligent sensors which communicate with each other and can be searched for information," said Dr Iadh Ounis, of the University of Glasgow's School of Computing Science.

 

"The search results sourced from these smart cities can be reused across multiple applications, making the system more effective."

 

The team from Glasgow University hopes the SMART project will be ready for testing in a real city by 2014.

 

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Plants 'talk' to owners via app

Plants 'talk' to owners via app | Web of Things | Scoop.it

For those who are not naturally green-fingered, the idea of a talking plant may be very appealing.


Now a wi-fi sensor promises to help keep plants alive, alerting owners when their plants need water, light and food.


The sensor gathers data such as soil moisture, temperature and light intensity from plants.


The data is analysed and detailed care instructions sent to the owner via either a web-based or smartphone app.


The device is the brainchild of a Swiss firm, Koubachi, named to sound like Tamagotchi, the digital "pets" that were all the rage in the 1990s.


"The Koubachi wi-fi plant sensor is the first device ever that enables real-time monitoring of a plant's vitality," says Philipp Bolliger, chief executive officer and inventor of Koubachi.


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Knut internet-connected sensor keeps you in the know via email

Knut internet-connected sensor keeps you in the know via email | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Much like the Twine device that we saw last November, and the more recent Electric Imp, the Knut is a small sensor-equipped module that enables you to remotely monitor equipment and spaces in your home. The Knut comes equipped with a temperature sensor so that you can monitor the temperature of your wine refrigerator, humidor, basement, etc. It connects to the internet via Wi-Fi and can send out alerts and information to its owner by way of email and text message.

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Cosm - How Cosm Works

Cosm - How Cosm Works | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things was an idea. Now it’s a reality. Right now on the Cosm platform, developers and companies are connecting devices and apps to securely store and exchange data. It’s the one solution that brings big ideas about the world to the world.

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How Evrythng could give any physical object a life online

How Evrythng could give any physical object a life online | Web of Things | Scoop.it
What will you be able to do with it?

 

Via their online presences, Evrythng-enabled objects will be able to have all sorts of data associated with them, whether entered manually or updated automatically via sensors attached to the objects themselves.

 

Examples? As Evrythng’s own site suggests:

 

“Your Nikon D90 might, with your permission, suggest times and place to get the best photos: “19th November looks like a clear night with a full moon– go to the foot of Tate Britain at 7.15 for the perfect night shot of St. Paul’s Cathedral…

 

“Perhaps your sunburst Gibson Custom ES-330L (not just that type of guitar, but yours specifically) could let you specify the band you’d like to form and then connect you with other musicians near you who are at the same level of ability and play the other instruments in that band’s line-up.

 

“This data could also integrate with 3rd party apps – like a special deal with a bus company to do a tour of Devon for a group of Muse fans with Manson guitars like Matt Bellamy.”

 

http://evrythng.com/

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How Ninja Sphere Is Making The Internet Of Things Less Dumb

How Ninja Sphere Is Making The Internet Of Things Less Dumb | Web of Things | Scoop.it
A Kickstarter project is trying to marry home automation and the Internet of Things. You'll want one.

 

Ninja Sphere acts as an intelligent "hub" that connects to the separate devices you already own and helps them communicate with your other home automation gadgets without asking you to pull out your phone unless absolutely necessary. It does this in part by knowing where objects like your phone or your pets are located in relation to you. When a sensor notices some activity--the dog's Internet-connected collar sends an alert, for example--the Ninja Sphere tries to determine what action to take next.

...

Since the sphere can keep tabs on virtually any object that you attached a smart tag to, the possibilities become quite intriguing. Place a Bluetooth-enabled smart tag on your jewelry box, for instance. The Ninja Sphere could then detect that the box of valuables is moving, while also sensing that none of the owners' smartphones are nearby. It would then alert you to a potential theft in progress (or at least that the five-year-old is playing dress up with mom's best baubles).

 

The underlying trick is indoor location sensing, a technology that is quietly being installed in places like the Apple Store because it's useful to know where its shoppers are located and how they navigate around products. Indoor GPS, as it's sometimes called, could also help you as a smartphone owner navigate an office building you've never visited before.

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The Wi-Fi in your home can track your moves like Xbox Kinect

The Wi-Fi in your home can track your moves like Xbox Kinect | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Want to switch off the living room lights from bed, change channels while washing dishes, or turn the heat up from the couch? A team at the University of Washington has rigged a standard Wi-Fi home network to detect your movements anywhere in the home and convert them into commands to control connected devices.

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The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog

The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So, what exactly is bringing the Internet of Things to fruition? A big factor is the plunging cost of connectivity, which is being driven by the emergence of Heterogeneous Networks (often referred to as “HetNets”). HetNets offer a way to increase the density and bandwidth available to mobile devices. 


To give you an idea of their potential scale, Free.fr, one of the world’s first HetNets, located in France, has more than 4 million WiFi hotspots connected to the  network and enjoys data transfer costs that are probably far below $1 per gigabyte. (...)


The second major factor driving the Internet of Things is the explosion of low-cost, smart, standardized sensor networks. Consumer hobbyists are leading the way here. Kickstarter, the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects is hosting numerous sensor projects that are designed to enable consumers to rapidly deploy and utilize large numbers of sensors around the home and office.


Raspberry Pi is one of the most popular recent initiatives in this space. The company has created a credit card-sized computer that integrates with physical devices like TVs and keyboards to give users PC functionality, such as spreadsheets and word processing, without having to buy a computer. Designed for hobbyists, it starts at a mere $25.


Another interesting initiative is Sensordrone, a multi-sensor device for smartphones that was recently funded by Kickstarter that gives phones even more capabilities, like connecting to printers. In another development, Nokia pledged to push the envelope in terms of adding new and innovative sensors and geo-location capabilities to their phones.


By Paul Brody 

30 Dec 2012


Via Spaceweaver
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Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia

Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia | Web of Things | Scoop.it
PrimeSense, which developed the 3D sensing technology used in Microsoft’s Kinect, is set to unveil a compact 3D sensor that can fit into a variety of consumer electronic devices.

The Capri 1.25 embedded 3D sensor is around one-tenth the size of PrimeSense’s current generation of 3D sensors, the Israeli company said Tuesday in a press release. Capri has improved 3D sensing algorithms, it said.

Apple’s control through patents over many elements of touch-based user interfaces discourages competitors from innovating in this area, Malik Saadi, principal analyst with Informa Telecoms & Media, said Wednesday. Many vendors are looking into alternatives, like touch-free gesture recognition that can be facilitated by 3D sensors, he said.

Samsung is looking at gesture recognition and will probably be deploying it next year or soon after, Saadi said.

Voice and gesture recognition are key to the future of smartphones, Saadi said. The combination of touch with voice and gesture recognition will very likely lead to a superior user experience and innovative application development, he said.

- Macworld Australia
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On Sale At Last: Twine, Your Gateway To The Internet Of Things

On Sale At Last: Twine, Your Gateway To The Internet Of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A year ago, two MIT Media Lab graduates raised half a million dollars on Kickstarter to create Twine, a cigarette-pack-sized chunk of Internet magic that promised to turn any object in your home into a web-connected, interactive "smart product."...


Flip the rubbery, featureless box over on its back and two instructions reveal themselves: "Place this side up," and "go to Twinesetup.com." From there, configuring Twine feels like an adventure instead of a chore. Wow, it just connected to the Web by itself … Now a little light is turning on … Whoa, now I can see an image of it in my Web browser, sensing the temperature … What will this thing do next?


With Twine, building your own personal "Internet of things" is supposed to be easier than programming a VCR. And now that the product is available for purchase, it looks like creators John Kestner and David Carr have very nearly delivered on that ambitious promise.


John Pavlus

27 Nov 2012


Via Eugene Ch'ng
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Futuristic startup super charges your possessions into digital life

Futuristic startup super charges your possessions into digital life | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Evrythng takes us a step closer towards the Internet of Things.


Rebecca Grant from venturebeat interviews Evrythng founder Niall Murphy.  He is quoted:


“The concept of the Internet of Things has been around of a long time, but only now are the conditions interesting for it to become real. There was no infrastructure on the net for things to have a digital identity. Now with smart phones and other innovations in technology, we can give every single thing a web presence.”


“Our vision is that everything is connected to make the world smarter and more efficient,” Murphy said. “Maybe we are staring at the sky, but why not? I love the idea of the physical world and the digital world seamlessly co-existing. There are endless opportunities.”


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Tempo wants to be the database at the center of the Internet of things

Tempo wants to be the database at the center of the Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Once we connect 50 billion devices to the web by 2020, what will those devices talk to? Chicago Startup Tempo hopes those sensors will take to its database as a service — depositing their tiny bits of time series data inside its custom database.
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‘Smart Cities’ On The Increase, Despite Obstacles And Risks | Risk Watchdog

The establishment of ‘smart cities’ globally is being driven by the growing need to augment/automate a wide range of legacy productivity, distribution, and consumption platforms.


Current and forecast population growth and urbanisation trends demand the creation of hundreds of new cities – or new communities within existing cities – over the next couple of decades, and this is an ideal time to develop, test and implement new technologies to replace outmoded and inefficient platforms.


...

 

But, security and data privacy are treated as an after-thought. Somebody else’s problem, effectively, according to several people I spoke to. This is worrying if the majority of systems are to be routinely deeply interconnected in the future. A simple virus could shut off the national grid, crash aircraft, or send nuclear reactors critical.

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Big changes ahead as tiny devices change way we live

Big changes ahead as tiny devices change way we live | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Australian company Taggle Systems has taken the concept of connected devices to an extreme. It has developed a low-power 25 milli-watt transmitter that can send a signal more than 10km and lasts for more than 10 years on a single AA battery.

..

The Taggle receiver is designed to collect a small amount of data from thousands of low-value transmitters. "So you can get the device that goes on a water meter down to an incredibly low cost because power is usually a large chunk of the total cost of the device," Andrews says.

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Gmail and iPhone alums create Electric Imp, connect your toaster to the web

Gmail and iPhone alums create Electric Imp, connect your toaster to the web | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Electric Imp is about to make your wireless control / monitoring fantasies a reality with its soon-to-be-released, $25 web interface. It works much like an Eye-Fi card, and communicates with cloud services as well as other connected devices like your Android or iPhone via WiFi. The company is working hard to get the slots that work with the cards into many of the machines that we usually don't link up to the good ol' www -- but have often wanted to -- and it hopes to have everything in place later this year.

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tōd:Connect Real World Actions to Mobile Devices and the Web

tōd (pronounced "toad") is an exciting and powerful new way to connect your mobile device* to the world around and right in front of you, using our bite-sized ultra low power Bluetooth 4.0 enabled Smart Beacons.

 

Simply attach or place a tōd Smart Beacon, that can run for years on a single coin-cell battery onto anything, anywhere you want to extend mobile device or web functionality. Or, you can interact with Smart Beacons placed by others that you are allowed to connect with.

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