Web of Things
Follow
12.6K views | +0 today
Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Smart Cities: Understanding the Untapped Value of Sensor Data

Smart Cities: Understanding the Untapped Value of Sensor Data | Web of Things | Scoop.it
This fall, Chicago will install a network of 40 sensors to discover how new data sets can inform decisions that make the city a better place to live. The Array of Things initiative will begin with devices being installed on light poles at the University of Chicago, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and Argonne National laboratory, and will be expanded in the coming years to a system of 1,000 sensors that cover the city’s central business district.

Every 15 seconds, the sensors will collect and report data on temperature, humidity, carbon monoxide, vibration, light and sound. At this early stage, officials are imagining how this data might improve city walkability and how the network can connect with pedestrians’ phones via Bluetooth to create an even richer data set.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Significant progress in intelligent radio-over-fiber (I-ROF) systems

Driven by the strong demand for high-definition video, digital health services, the Internet of Things, and virtual reality, broadband, ubiquitous and convergent information access has become the most important engine to drive the development of the modern information society.


With increasing numbers of information-based interactions among humans, machines and objects, especially as new services, new terminals and new needs emerge, the networks are required to provide flexible, energy-efficient, safe and broadband access services anywhere at any time, and therefore wideband and ubiquitous information access has become the great demand of the modern information society. However, it is difficult to meet the growing demand with the existing technologies, so new solutions must be explored as a matter of urgency. The intelligent radio-over-fiber (I-ROF) system, which combines the advantages of flexible wireless access and fiber-optic broadband transmission, uses the methods of microwave photonics to realize the generation of multi-band, multi-standard microwave signals in the optical domain, along with broadband processing, large dynamic transmission, fast access and reconfigurable networking, and can thus provide an effective way to achieve broadband and ubiquitous access


ScienceBlog.com

29 Nov 2012

more...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

A Real Internet Of Things For The Developing World (And Burning Man)

A Real Internet Of Things For The Developing World (And Burning Man) | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Aria has a grand idea: creating an Internet-like network of autonomous aerial vehicles (AAVs)  that could one day allow someone to make a one-to-one sale with anyone in the world or send medication quickly to where it’s needed most, simply by delivering goods on a flying autonomous vehicle to its destination. But before Aria (that’s the name of Matternet’s open-source group) does that, it’s teaming up with ReAllocate--an organization that’s building a network of designers and engineers who want to use their expertise to work on humanitarian issues--for an experimental project at Burning Man (if Aria can secure tickets; that’s still up in the air).

 

After the Burning Man pilot, ReAllocate plans to bring the shipping container project, dubbed "Startup Country," to Oakland to create a portable kitchen for food entrepreneurs. "We’re transforming shipping containers into innovation centers," says Dr. Mike North, the founder of ReAllocate. "We want to take them into the developing world, bring people from the community in, and facilitate them developing their own social enterprises."

 

As with the Burning Man project, Aria can use these shipping containers in the developing world as ground stations where it can swap batteries and payload. "The ground stations are like the routers of the Internet. They can extend range and capacity of the drones," explains Arturo Pelayo, the co-founder of Aria.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Services from healthcare to energy will change over the next decade as machine-to-machine communication facilitates more sophisticated automation.

 

The shift will be led by a combination of improved network communication, smaller and lower cost embedded devices and the development of common standards.

 

However, privacy, security and the risk of network congestion will need to be overcome, while technology standards and streamlined regulations are also a prerequisite.

 

These claims are made in a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), entitled Rise of the Machines

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Things and the Emergence of Planetary Public Policy

The Internet of Things and the Emergence of Planetary Public Policy | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"It is always good to re-read Kevin Kelly’s Rules for the New Economy (article came out in 1997, the book in 1999). My Tec de Monterrey students will remember that we read it in 2003 as “contemporary political theory.” The following passage is taken from the 1999 book:

 

"A trillion dumb chips connected into a hive mind is the hardware. The software that runs through it is the network economy. A planet covered with hyperlinked chips is shrouded with waves of sensibility. Millions of moisture sensors in the fields of farmers shoot up data, hundreds of weather satellites beam down digitized images, thousands of cash registers spit out bit streams, myriad hospital bedside monitors trickle out signals, millions of web sites tally attention, and tens of millions of vehicles transmit their location code; all of this swirls into the web. That matrix of signals is the net."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Two good infrastructure considerations for the internet of things from SXSW

Two good infrastructure considerations for the internet of things from SXSW | Web of Things | Scoop.it
We may accept that the internet of things will become commonplace in the next few years, but how do we build out the network and processing required to support it?

 

The network is probably the most important (and is definitely the most expensive) element of the internet of things infrastructure, but another ongoing debate is about where the information collected by the thousands (millions?) of sensors we’ll connect will be turned into action or aggregated to form meaningful insight. Namely, will the processing happen in the cloud, or will it happen locally?

 

Wael Diab, senior technical director at Broadcom’s infrastructure and networking group, noted that the pendulum has swung back and forth between centralized and distributed processing since the mainframe. But what’s worth noting about the internet of things is that there will need to be both — and where the processing takes place will be dynamic depending on several factors.

 

For example, if the promise of a truly universal internet of things ever occurs (as opposed to siloed areas of connectivity in the medical space, the home, the car etc) then devices might send certain types of data to a local hub in a medical or automotive setting because it’s more secure or cheaper, but take advantage of the cloud and wireline broadband in the home or work setting.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

French Startup SigFox Has Developed a Wireless Internet Service for Gadgets and Appliances

A startup hopes to connect millions of low-power sensors worldwide to the Internet, making everything—from power grids to home appliances—smarter.


The networks that serve humans are based on technology that isn’t suitable for sensors, says Thomas Nicholls, chief of business development and Internet of Things evangelism at SigFox. “If you compare with a GSM [cell-phone] network, then our solution is much cheaper, provides much lower energy consumption, and operates over a much longer range,” he says.


SigFox builds its networks in the same way as a cellular provider, using a system of connected antennas that each cover a particular area and link back to the operator’s central network. But the antennas use a different radio technology, developed by SigFox, known as ultra narrow band. This technology would not be of much use for streaming video to an iPhone, but it allows devices connecting to the network to consume very little energy, says Nicholls, and it allows for very long-range connections. (...)


SigFox reports seeing most interest in its technology from companies trying to roll out so-called smart grids, an approach to electricity distribution that uses data from sensors throughout a power network—including in customers’ homes—to help improve efficiency and reliability. That tallies with Foster’s experience. “Government stimulus, environmental legislation, and the desire of utilities to increase operational efficiency have been key drivers,” he says.



by Tom Simonite | MIT Technology Review

13 Nov 12


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Social Web of Things

Ericsson believes that in the Networked Society, more than 50 billion things will be connected, in order to make our lives and our businesses more efficient ...

 

https://twitter.com/petervan/status/212430773515587584 - a lonely and sterile scene that "needs humanizing" methinks. - @ddrrnt

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Windows8 Embedded Helps make the Internet of Things Possible

Windows8 Embedded Helps make the Internet of Things Possible | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Windows8 Embedded Helps make the Internet of Things Possible...

 

"This idea of cheap and plentiful network-connected embedded devices has been called the “Internet of things,” meaning the system that does online detection of offline objects and their physical properties. Although it has been predicted for many years, such an Internet of things may actually take hold now in part due to cloud computing services like Microsoft Azure.

 

So for instance, owners of vending machines, could benefit by embedding the machines with processors and connecting them to a network. A small system embedded inside a machine can keep a tally of which snacks or other items are being sold. With Windows8, the system would be able to provide other information that could keep a vibrant inventory, increase sales. and get a running tally of all the snacks being sold across all the machines."

more...
No comment yet.