Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Check out the crazy $99 connected electric toothbrush

Check out the crazy $99 connected electric toothbrush | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Kolibree is announcing what it calls the world’s first connected electric toothbrush today. It sounds pretty weird, but Kolibree says it can analyze your brushing habits and display them on a mobile dashboard that you can access from your phone. The idea is to motivate you, or shame you, into brushing better.

 

For $99, it better be good.

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Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility

Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So what are today’s forward-thinking professionals doing with this new technology?

 

They’re finding that work is a whole lot simpler, faster and more enjoyable with data devices that can sort, synthesize and analyze data as well as collect it, and that can work seamlessly with both worksite machinery and advanced office hardware.


Take the public works sector: Government agencies and private companies across the world are using rugged technology for a wide range of tracking, monitoring, reporting and scheduling tasks essential to city maintenance — all while saving time and improving the accuracy of their data.


For example, GPS-enabled devices can tag along worry-free for messy catch-basin cleanup runs and sewer line repairs, and dashboard-mounted tablets with tracking software can simplify data collection on street-sweeping and waste-collection routes, without ill effects from constant road vibrations.


The data these computers collect can be stored, organized, charted, transmitted wirelessly to office locations, and formed into customized reports. Simple manual and sensor-based data input reduces human error and increases accuracy for record-keeping and important reporting, such as for governmental regulations or grant compliance.

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Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother?

Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Say goodbye to privacy: In the future, advertisers, app makers, the government, and even our employers might be able to assess our personalities and react based on what we do with our phones.


Oliver Brdiczka, a manager at PARC, is working on contextual intelligence. The research, he hopes, will allow enterprises and the government to use data that is accumulated as we use our mobile phones. The data mined from our email messages, Facebook conversations, and sensors in the phone can be used for a variety of purposes, including intelligence, marketing and app design, even employee relations. In other words, owning a smart phone with this capability will be like having a spy ratting out your thoughts to the government.


For instance, PARC is working on a project that predicts a person's personality through their online behavior. The idea, Brdiczka said, is to market this data to enterprises, who want to know people's intent for targeted advertising or developing content customization. (...)


"Imagine a device that immediately lights up when you hold it in your hand and offers you the five most likely things you were going to do next: call your co-worker, drive to the meeting you're about to have, book a dinner or catch up on that article that you wanted to read," said Cue CEO Daniel Gross. "We'll be able to breathe life into our current phones, which currently only do things when we explicitly tell them every detail of what we want to do."

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How to Use Mobile Devices to Solve Global Problems

How to Use Mobile Devices to Solve Global Problems | Web of Things | Scoop.it

In 1999, half of the world had either never used a phone or had to travel more than two hours to reach the nearest one. Years later, mobile devices are being used in extremely innovative ways to connect and empower people around the world.


Via Spaceweaver
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TedWomen: Amber Case on Cyborg Anthropology

Amber Case is a "cyborg anthropologist" studying how technology is affecting us, and how we in turn affect one another. Tweeting your lunch can have meaning.
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Forget ‘Cellphone,’ That’s a ‘Tracker’ in Your Pocket - Truthdig

Forget ‘Cellphone,’ That’s a ‘Tracker’ in Your Pocket - Truthdig | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Mobile phone service providers collect user information and share it with the government, to the tune of at least 1.3 million disclosures per year. What if our nomenclature reflected that?


Peter Maass and Megha Rajagopalan, digital privacy reporters for ProPublica, argue that cellphones function primarily as tools for keeping tabs on their owners. And our best hopes for addressing the dangers inherent in that fact begin with calling them by their rightful name.


—Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly. Follow him on Twitter: @areedkelly.

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The Flight From Conversation

The Flight From Conversation | Web of Things | Scoop.it
We use technology to keep one another at distances we can control: not too close, not too far, just right: the Goldilocks effect.

Via Wildcat2030, Andrea Graziano
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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 4, 2012 9:49 PM
this is so true, txs for this post
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Heads-On: MindWave Lets You Control Mobile Games With Brain Waves

Heads-On: MindWave Lets You Control Mobile Games With Brain Waves | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Mindwave Mobile Brainwave Headset is a $130 EEG headset that’s compatible with iOS devices, Android phones, and, yes, even desktop computers. The headset measures brainwaves from your forehead — changes in electrical activity, really — which it then filters with complex algorithms to eliminate any interference from other electronic sources, and narrow down what those brainwaves really mean. Currently, the system can detect concentration, meditation and blinks, and uses these cues to control simple iOS and Android games.

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Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes

Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Street Bump automatically transmits the presence of rough roads to city workers, helping improve the timeliness of road repairs.

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Senseye - Eye control for mobile devices

"You thought Siri’s voice interface for the iPhone 4S was pretty slick? Wait until you see what the people behind Copenhagen-based project Senseye have planned – controlling your phone with your eyes." via thenextweb.com - http://goo.gl/IIil8

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Here's what one venture capitalist seeks from the Internet of things

Here's what one venture capitalist seeks from the Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Barry Eggers, an investor at Lightspeed Venture Partners, is trying to piece together growth opportunities in the emerging Internet of things, and while he can't be sure, he's got some ideas.

 

Data scientists, entrepreneurs, and IT analysts have great hopes for the Internet of things. One analyst recently declared 2014 to be the year when IT buyers focus more on the Internet of things.

 

In line with the much parroted software-is-eating-the-world logic, Eggers is betting that the control point will turn out to be in a person’s phone rather than on a separate, wholly new device for the home.

“The penetration of smartphones is pretty high,” he said. “… Why isn’t the control point just your mobile phone? It has all the radios in it that you need. It has all of the software you need.” It’s reasonable to think of them as a solid landing pad for all the data and analytics from the Internet of things devices a person owns or uses.

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Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia

Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia | Web of Things | Scoop.it
PrimeSense, which developed the 3D sensing technology used in Microsoft’s Kinect, is set to unveil a compact 3D sensor that can fit into a variety of consumer electronic devices.

The Capri 1.25 embedded 3D sensor is around one-tenth the size of PrimeSense’s current generation of 3D sensors, the Israeli company said Tuesday in a press release. Capri has improved 3D sensing algorithms, it said.

Apple’s control through patents over many elements of touch-based user interfaces discourages competitors from innovating in this area, Malik Saadi, principal analyst with Informa Telecoms & Media, said Wednesday. Many vendors are looking into alternatives, like touch-free gesture recognition that can be facilitated by 3D sensors, he said.

Samsung is looking at gesture recognition and will probably be deploying it next year or soon after, Saadi said.

Voice and gesture recognition are key to the future of smartphones, Saadi said. The combination of touch with voice and gesture recognition will very likely lead to a superior user experience and innovative application development, he said.

- Macworld Australia
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Making The Internet Of Things A Reality: Mobility Meets Big Data In The Cloud -- "Triple Word Score"! - Forbes

Making The Internet Of Things A Reality: Mobility Meets Big Data In The Cloud -- "Triple Word Score"! - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Basically, four key elements are required for IoTs – a) Tagging Things b) Sensing Things c) Shrinking Things and d) Thinking Things. With advances in RFID, miniaturization and analytics, M2M makes the Internet of Things an increasingly tangible possibility. Think of such M2M communication as the “social collaboration” of machine-to-machine or machine-to-man.


Such technology is beginning to mature, whether it’s smart thermostats from startups like Nest Labs or Honeywell, or what’s being called “precision retailing”, where innovations in Big Data Analytics, combined with Mobility and GPS, allow tailored promotions to be offered to consumers on their mobile devices.


by Sanjay Poonen, SAP

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Why London's Police Just Set a Horrifying Precedent on Mobile Privacy

Why London's Police Just Set a Horrifying Precedent on Mobile Privacy | Web of Things | Scoop.it
London's Metropolitan Police recently started using machines that allow law enforcement to tap into any mobile device and download call registers, photographs, videos, SMS, email and even social networking data in under 20 minutes.

Via Peter Vander Auwera
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Tapping Earth's magnetic field for indoor navigation

Tapping Earth's magnetic field for indoor navigation | Web of Things | Scoop.it

While outdoor navigation has been mastered with GPS satellites and cell phone triangulation, indoor navigation has proven more tricky.


Now, a group of researchers at the University of Oulu in Finland has tapped the Earth's magnetic field to create an indoor positioning system (IPS).  The researchers say their approach was inspired by studying the way homing pigeons and lobsters use anomalies in the magnetic field to navigate their travels.

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A Phone that Knows Where You're Going

A Phone that Knows Where You're Going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

An algorithm can better predict your future movements by getting a little help from your friends.


Researchers in the U.K. have come up with an algorithm that follows your own mobility patterns and adjusts for anomalies by factoring in the patterns of people in your social group (defined as people who are mutual contacts on each other's smartphones).


All of the study participants lived within 30 miles of Lausanne, Switzerland, and were mainly "students, researchers, and people that are fairly predictable anyway." But the findings are considered noteworthy because they exploit the "synchronized rhythm of the city" for greater predictive insights.


The paper was part of a Nokia-sponsored Mobile Data Challenge grew out of another mid-2000s reality mining project sponsored by Nokia.

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Mobile and the Internet of Things enable contextual-intelligence

Mobile not only increases the reach of services but it provides additional context, such as location and presence. Location technologies–such as triangulation, wireless location signatures, and GPS–will be combined to provide rich indoor and outdoor location for both people and things. In the future, embedded sensors that provide environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature will be commonplace. Sensors will provide another aspect of context that services can tap into.


For example, your mobile device has access to your calendar so it knows if you’re running late for a meeting in downtown L.A. It can alert your car to connect to services like Streetline to help you find an available (sensor-enabled) parking spot while alerting your manager that you’re late. Other examples could link contextual attributes, such as presence and location, with enterprise social software. Instead of using a paging system, a nurse could use enterprise social software on a tablet to locate an available cardiologist on the third floor of a hospital and a defibrillator on the fourth floor.

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Mariana Soffer's comment, June 19, 2012 8:40 AM
very interesting
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touchatag

touchatag | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Although touchatag tags are NFC compliant, they cannot be overwritten. Much of the tag's internal memory is used for communication with the touchatag service. There is about 4 bytes of free space on a touchatag tag.

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Easier, better identitiy on the horizon

Easier, better identitiy on the horizon | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Together, three trends lead to an Internet of Things, where smart phones use NFC to make statements about the physical world. For example, there has already been an art exhibition that lets visitors vote for their favorite display by tapping with their smartphone. But more importantly, there’s an Internet of Secure Things coming. You will be able to use your smartphone to badge in to work, unlock your PC, start your car or motorcycle (the prototype of that is already working), as well as merely pay for things.

 

It isn’t going to all happen in 2012, but we are likely to look back at 2012 as the year when it took off."

 

By Jon Callas, CTO, Entrust One - on the confluence of few major trends.

 

SecureIDNews 

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Motorola Nexus with NFC: "First steps" towards the Internet of Things?

Motorola Nexus with NFC: "First steps" towards the Internet of Things? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"As NFC devices become more common, Google will use them to construct a richly-detailed virtual universe, the first steps towards the fabled 'Internet of things' -- whereby all manner of devices will be able to talk to each other as part of a vast network of technologies and services, beyond the scale of the current internet."

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