Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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CleverCap Pill Bottle Connects to Wifi, Dispenses Only as Directed, Uploads To The Cloud

CleverCap Pill Bottle Connects to Wifi, Dispenses Only as Directed, Uploads To The Cloud | Web of Things | Scoop.it
About half of all medication prescribed in the United States is not taken as directed. Some have proposed stomach acid-activated microchips. CleverCap is a less sci-fi fix: a cap that fits on standard pill bottles.

 

It includes an alarm that tells patients when it’s time to take their medications and it only dispenses the prescribed amount. The device connects to the Internet to allow doctors and pharmaceuticals to monitor patients’ compliance. It connects via a mobile device or a Qualcomm Life hub called 2Net.

 

“[M]edication adherence information is more valuable for clinical and research purposes when analyzed in the context of synchronized remote-monitored vital signs,” said Moses Zonana, CEO of Compliance Meds.

 

While connected medical devices are popping up nearly by the day, no one knows how they will end up communicating with one another and with doctors and patients. That’s why 2Net scoops up with Wi-Fi and cellular data and offers a home hub and a mobile app software development kit, or SDK.

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Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data

Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Put all this data in the cloud, (privacy not included) and personal medicine becomes a reality, tracking our mood, skin temperatures and the analysis of correlated data becomes a new picture we have of ourselves, and a new image we can project unto the world.

 

“They’re really external extensions of our mind,” said Joseph Tranquillo, associate professor of biomedical and electrical engineering at Bucknell University. (referring to all our networked devices- CNN)

 

So, vast amounts of data, self-tracking, personal information stock exchange, our own memories in the cloud, implants under our skins transmitting the data continuously.

 

by @Wildcat2030

 


Via Peter Vander Auwera
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Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:58 AM
Thanks Peter, glad you liked the article
Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:59 AM
Thanks for sharing this, glad you liked the article
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'Pharmacy on a chip' gets closer

'Pharmacy on a chip' gets closer | Web of Things | Scoop.it
US scientists say they have taken a step towards microchips being implanted under a patient's skin to control the release of drugs.

Via Bart Collet
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Future business

Future business | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Human knowledge doubled every century until the 1900s, says David Evans (technology giant Cisco’s resident futurist), but nowadays it is every two to three years. Some 70 per cent of all information has been created since the internet began. In 50 years’ time, he says, 95 per cent of everything humans know will have been discovered in those 50 years. The 21st century will be the equivalent to 20,000 years of human progress. The internet is becoming an internet of things. Somewhere between 2008 and 2009, we crossed a line where there were more connected devices online than people. We have about two devices per person now, he says, and in the next decade that will rise to seven. By the end of the decade, there will be 50 billion “things” online – things that can communicate with each other.

 

Or with us. There’s already a pill that contains a tiny chip that can give feedback about the inside of the patient to a physician, he says.

 

With all these objects and devices, we’ll be creating massive amounts of information – the latest term of measurement needed to enable people to talk about such amounts is the zettabyte, a data equivalent of the content of a stack of books stretching from the Earth to Pluto . . . 20 times, he says.

 

by KARLIN LILLINGTON - The Irish Times - Fri, Feb 24, 2012

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AT&T eyes healthcare, autos in Internet of things race

AT&T eyes healthcare, autos in Internet of things race | Web of Things | Scoop.it

One hot selling connection for AT&T has been the Vitality GlowCap, which is a prescription container lid that reminds patients when to take their...

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Authenticate or Die - Forbes

Authenticate or Die - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet:

"That anonymity—one of the few serious flaws in the design of the Internet—is giving the bad guys plenty of cover and keeping society as a whole from fully benefiting from what the Internet has to offer.

 

And this situation is only going to get worse as we move to what’s been dubbed the “Internet of Things.”

 

It’s a world where the line between what’s a computer and what’s not a computer gets increasingly blurred, and every device we have looks, smells, and behaves more and more like a computer. The smartphone is the most obvious example, but now you can add things such as cars, medical devices, household appliances, almost every device in your a/v cabinet and more. Increasingly, the things in our everyday infrastructure are gaining the intelligence and the processing power of computers, which means they’re also vulnerable to attack."

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This Tiny Gizmo Could Be A Very Big Deal In 2013 - And Beyond

This Tiny Gizmo Could Be A Very Big Deal In 2013 - And Beyond | Web of Things | Scoop.it
A $70 gizmo from Leap Motion could change the way we interact with computers - and eventually, lots of other things, too.


Wired called this "the best gesture-control system we've ever tested." The Verge called it "the next big thing in computing."


Leap Motion has already received preorders worth tens of millions of dollars, says Andy Miller, the company’s president and COO. (...)


Because Leap Motion has big plans. Laptops and desktops are just the start. “The consumer is side a way of getting it out there, but the bigger business might be licensing deals,” Miller says. “We have been contacted by thousands of businesses that want to use this.”


He reels off potential applications that range from robotic surgery to fighter jets, from semiconductor clean rooms to fast-food restaurant kitchens. “We’ve talked about seatback screens on planes,” he says. “Climate control systems. Set-top boxes and TVs and remote controls. Tablets. MRIs.”


McDonald’s and Jack in the Box like the idea of putting Leap Motion controllers in their kitchens so that workers can manipulate screens without having to touch them.


Others want to use Leap Motion in casinos, nightclubs and DJ booths to let people control huge video boards.


“This is a big thing that really could change the way we interact with devices,” Miller says.


Dan Lyons / read write 

24 Dec 2012



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can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns

can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Things are getting a “voice,” says Ric Asselstine, chief executive officer of Terepac Corp., a Waterloo company that makes tiny electronics to put into objects to make them “smart” and compatible with the Internet of Things.

 

“At the end of the day, what we’re creating is information,” Asselstine said in a phone interview from Terepac’s headquarters on Colby Drive.

 

There is the potential for “trillions” of devices to be connected to the Internet of Things, he said, noting all of the objects in his office alone.

 

“The potential is literally boundless.”

 

Consumer products, medical devices and agricultural methods, such as managing crop moisture with sensors, can be a part of the Internet of Things.

 

Data about locations and conditions can be transmitted through these objects, Asselstine said.

 

[...]

 

ABI Research analyst Sam Lucero said privacy is already an issue.

 

“We’re already seeing tremendous privacy concerns around, for instance, smart meter data,” said Lucero, practice director of machine-to-machine connectivity for the New York-based tech trends firm.

 

“How is the owner of those devices and that data assured that the data is being used in agreed upon ways and that security is assured?”

 

This is going to be multiplied as different applications and devices become interconnected, he said.

 

TheRecord.com by LuAnn LaSalle

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Machines may say: move over doctor

M2M uses a device (a surface or implanted sensor) to capture an event (e.g., BP, blood sugar, ECG) which is relayed to an application (software programme) that translates the captured event into meaningful information. This information is then analysed by an Artificial Intelligent System (AIS) reviewed by a physician and instructions for corrective measures (e.g., release of appropriate insulin from implanted pump) are sent.

 

The H2M interaction is possible today without a mouse, keyboard or touch screen. Gesture-based computing (MicrosoftKinect) is already being used by physically challenged patients. Unique virtual reality activities and simulated tasks using gestures are more exciting than traditional physiotherapy regimes. At present, an automatic blood analyser gives a printout of various tests on scores of patients. It is possible to instruct the analyser to directly send abnormal results through SMS to the primary consultant, an e.g. of M2H (machine to human) interaction. In “the Brave New World” these results can be sent automatically along with clinical data to an AIS which, in turn, would recommend appropriate action with a cc to a human.

 

Surface or embedded devices can send details of calorie consumption or sleep patterns to help consumers tailor their habits. A medical alert pendant can, in the case of patient incapacity due to a fall, pacemaker failure, etc, automatically inform a response centre from where a PC with AI (artificial intelligence) will contact the nearest ambulance.

 

via The Hindu : Opinion

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Weaving electronics into the fabric of our physical world

“With these non-conventional materials you have a great deal of freedom. We believe this approach to circuitry in substrates will lead to the creation of smart substances, and once you start thinking about the possible applications, it’s hard to stop: surgeon’s gloves with smart skin, walls of a house that store energy and generate large-scale displays, magazines with interactive video in the pages, devices that dissolve the toxins in water, bio-interfaces in mobile phones with diagnostic capabilities, clothing that generates energy – the possibilities are endless!”

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Deccan Herald » Internet of Things

"The practical use of connected devices are limitless. Medical devices such as pacemakers and glucose meters can alert doctors on their own if they read anything wrong.


You can log in to your kitchen gadgets and start cooking as you drive home. Sensors fitted in a building can draw attention to the parts, which need maintenance. If this sounds futuristic, the future is here. A high-end car may come fitted with up to 200 sensors that may monitor all key parameters – from engine performance to tyre pressures."

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