Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Application platforms, big data and collaborations are IoT enablers

Application platforms, big data and collaborations are IoT enablers | Web of Things | Scoop.it

An analyst's view: The IoT can be characterised as an ever-expanding universe of connected things, and to guide companies through this system, identifying specific collaboration partners within a specific topic area is a wise starting point.

. . . 

IoT requires quicker application development platforms to address the growing requirements of enterprises in maximising the benefits in this market opportunity, and at the same time, IoT needs to be enabled by scalable application management platforms, handling the new volumes of data and applications.


To be able to handle these volumes of data, M2M and IoT service enablement and application platforms as well as associated databases and analytical tools will need to be highly scalable, and sufficiently agile and flexible to manage the heterogeneity in data types and structures.

. . .

In reflecting the texture and attributes of IoT, ‘Subnets of Things’ will remain scalable, agile and flexible, constantly evolving and creating (or re-creating) new and exciting business relationships and partnerships between diverse set of stakeholders.

 

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Weightless finalizes its white spaces networking standard for the internet of things

Weightless finalizes its white spaces networking standard for the internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Weightless SIG claims the new standard will allow for ultra-low-power transmissions at long-range and at a cheap manufacturing cost. If true, that would make the technology ideal for M2M communications.
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Significant progress in intelligent radio-over-fiber (I-ROF) systems

Driven by the strong demand for high-definition video, digital health services, the Internet of Things, and virtual reality, broadband, ubiquitous and convergent information access has become the most important engine to drive the development of the modern information society.


With increasing numbers of information-based interactions among humans, machines and objects, especially as new services, new terminals and new needs emerge, the networks are required to provide flexible, energy-efficient, safe and broadband access services anywhere at any time, and therefore wideband and ubiquitous information access has become the great demand of the modern information society. However, it is difficult to meet the growing demand with the existing technologies, so new solutions must be explored as a matter of urgency. The intelligent radio-over-fiber (I-ROF) system, which combines the advantages of flexible wireless access and fiber-optic broadband transmission, uses the methods of microwave photonics to realize the generation of multi-band, multi-standard microwave signals in the optical domain, along with broadband processing, large dynamic transmission, fast access and reconfigurable networking, and can thus provide an effective way to achieve broadband and ubiquitous access


ScienceBlog.com

29 Nov 2012

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M2M Standard - Weightless White Spaces

M2M Standard - Weightless White Spaces | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Neul has cemented some high-profile industry support for Weightless, its would-be global, open, royalty-free standard for M2M comms which utilizes TV white space frequencies to allow machines to talk to each other — with the formation today of a special interest group (SIG) that aims to accelerate the adoption of Weightless. It has also put out a call for more industry players to join the SIG.


ARM, Cable & Wireless Worldwide, CSR and Neul have signed the Weightless ‘SIG Promoter Agreement,’ which details how they will back its mission to establish a new standard and encourage global adoption. The standard the SIG will define is said to be on track for completion in early 2013. As well as a common set of standards for powering M2M comms, other key components required to power the Internet of Things are a chipset costing under $2, a range of up to 10km and a battery life of 10 years, according to the SIG.


Professor William Webb, CEO of Weightless, noted in a statement: “This is a very important milestone for Weightless. The SIG now has a board comprising leading players spanning processors, networks, chipsets and innovative wireless technologies. Weightless has gained a solid legal framework enabling royalty-free licensing of terminal-related technology. Our plan is to rapidly grow membership from our current base of 50 high-technology companies and I would strongly encourage interested parties to join this world-changing initiative.”

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Mobile Europe - Only two M2M sectors ready for breakthrough

Mobile Europe - Only two M2M sectors ready for breakthrough | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Speaking at a seminar held by European Communucations, titled "Beyond Connectivity", Schlautmann said that the Fleet and Freight Management and Security and Surveillance sectors are the only two sectors achieving market "breakthrough". (...)


Schlautmann added that he "can't see" payments, vending and NFC becoming "mass market" in Europe, and added that metering and monitoring, often touted as a key vertical, offers little beyond basic connectivity revenues. Schlautmann also pointed out that "no other market" is so dependent on regulatory and legislative drivers - referencing eCall and smart metering as example. "If smart metering was not regulated then there would be no market at all," he said.

But it was for the e- and m-health market that he expressed his strongest reservations.(...)


"It's not about the number of devices." he said, "it's about revenue." To build revenues, telcos will need to develop ecosystems that let them orchestrate and develop services, so that they can benefit from the created value. At the moment, most markets exhibit far too many players, operating in too small spheres of influence. Telcos, by partnering, co-operating and forming alliances with partners throught the value chaing, could drive the sort of ecosystem consolidation that is required, he said, to drive "breakthrough" revenues.

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Jon Blackmore's curator insight, May 21, 2014 4:56 AM

These two industries are advanced because it makes sense, driving efficiency and squeezing the already ruthlessly tight margins in global transportation and with Security it is a governed requirement this is naturally the way to improve security, the infrastructure and imbedded capability to are already advanced enough to adopt M2M..

Needless to say the quicker any given industry and specific organisation adopts a Machine to machine strategy and roadmap the better!

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Smart Cities and Artificial Intelligence

Making infrastructure smart basically means adding intelligence to the networks through sensors, devices, M2M, etc that generate reliable data that can be processed in real time to provide information to all those involved in making decisions about their energy use, transport movement, weather conditions, financial status, healthcare monitoring etc.


By combining these databases in a trans-sector way – linking energy to traffic to healthcare, to weather, to economics – we will be able to move from the current silo-based structure to a true trans-sector structure.In the context of the global crisis, we must now look at every opportunity to build smarter communities. The next stage of human evolution is going to depend on merging humans and machines, something that is becoming increasingly possible through artificial intelligence (AI).


press release via PRNewswire

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When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data

When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

They're in vending machines, parking meters, home security systems, and even healthcare devices for the elderly. They are wireless sensors, a key component of the burgeoning machine-to-machine (M2M) industry where devices use wired and wireless connections to communicate with each other. Though far from new, M2M technology is expanding its reach at a dramatic rate.

 

M2M connections will grow to 2.1 billion by 2021, up from roughly 100 million last year, according to research firm Analysis Mason. The dramatic growth of global smartphone usage is a major factor in M2M's popularity, of course, as are industrial applications in the transportation, emergency services, security, and retail sectors.

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ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge

ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things represents a big opportunity to drive growth for both UK and worldwide economies. According to IMS Research, governments will play a key role in defining the regulations that will propel shipments for M2M communications modules to more than 118 million units by 2016, especially in the automotive sector.

 ...

The first forum will meet on August 24 in the UK and will be chaired by Gary Atkinson, who leads the Internet of Things initiative at ARM.

 

“In the next five years, over £2.4 billion will be spent in the UK on smart home energy management devices, ranging from smart meters themselves to in-home devices that are connected to them. This is a great example of an Internet of Things application, but is only a fraction of the market that will open up over the next 15-20 years,” said Atkinson.

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How's this for cool? T-Mobile is connecting ice machines

How's this for cool? T-Mobile is connecting ice machines | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Raco Wireless, T-Mobile’s machine-to-machine communications outsourcer, is working with an ice machine vendor to connect hundreds of thousands of these machines across the country, Raco President John Horn told me at the Connected World conference this week. He wouldn’t reveal the company, nor the timing. Horn would only say that the whole business of selling bagged ice in this country is about to significantly change.

 

Why on earth would you connect a bagged-ice machine? It’s the ideal use case for an M2M app, Horn said. The boxes can alert ice vendors when they start running low on inventory. They can send out a warning if the temperature of the machine rises above freezing or the refrigeration assembly appears to be malfunctioning, allowing the company to dispatch a repairman before the machine’s contents turn to slush. Horn said Raco is even working with the vendor to install remote payment terminals so customers can buy their ice on the spot and outside of business hours.

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Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Services from healthcare to energy will change over the next decade as machine-to-machine communication facilitates more sophisticated automation.

 

The shift will be led by a combination of improved network communication, smaller and lower cost embedded devices and the development of common standards.

 

However, privacy, security and the risk of network congestion will need to be overcome, while technology standards and streamlined regulations are also a prerequisite.

 

These claims are made in a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), entitled Rise of the Machines

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Solving a Spectrum Shortage for the Internet of Things with 2G

Solving a Spectrum Shortage for the Internet of Things with 2G | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Last January, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published a report (PDF available here) that foresaw a world of intercommunicating devices as a critical component of a healthy global economy. It noted the term "Internet of Things," but settled upon the more industrial term for the concept, machine-to-machine communication (M2M). The report created use cases for M2M devices that were as simple as automotive speedometers registering relative speed, perhaps to other devices within the same car, to brake monitoring systems that communicate a car's relative ability to stop to insurance companies. But the system that could make M2M both ubiquitous and inexpensive, the report made clear, is ironically the same system that carriers like AT&T are begging to decommission: the 2G network."

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Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes

Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Street Bump automatically transmits the presence of rough roads to city workers, helping improve the timeliness of road repairs.

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Now Even Lions Are Sending Texts

Now Even Lions Are Sending Texts | Web of Things | Scoop.it
A new project uses cell phone technology to monitor Kenyan wildlife, and to get around the high cost of satellite infrastructure.
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Record growth in Bluetooth Smart devices announced - M2M Now

Record growth in Bluetooth Smart devices announced - M2M Now | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A string of moves to add increasing levels of Bluetooth Smart Ready and Bluetooth Smart technology integration by leading OS providers like Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry, and most recently, Google, sets the stage for an extraordinary increase in Bluetooth Smart devices.  According to Bluetooth SIG, there was a year on year growth of more than 186% in the first half of 2013 alone.


Via JP DOUMENG
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Marcus Taylor's curator insight, December 16, 2013 7:43 PM

IOB - Internet of Bluetooth. It is a smart bet that it is a key driver.

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Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things

Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A fourth revolution (after the agricultural, industrial and information revolutions) is almost upon us: the age of the 'trillion-node network', also known as The Internet of Things.


Widespread machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is bringing about the Internet of Things — or 'the trillion-node network', as the authors of this book put it. Trillions: Thriving in the Emerging Information Ecology, which is written by the three principals of MAYA Design (a Pittsburgh-based design consultancy and technology research lab), addresses the problem of how to cope with an internet comprising trillions of nodes, the majority of which do not have a person directly controlling them. Peter Lucas, Joe Ballay and Mickey McManus warn of the chaotic complexity that's in danger of developing, and offer suggestions as to how to design a digital future in which "The data are no longer in the computers. We have come to see that the computers are in the data".


Up next is 'design science', an evolving discipline founded on a mixture of natural ecological patterns, professional design practices, traditional science and "a commitment to the search for underlying Architecture to provide structure". Key to the successful practice of design science, say the authors, will be: "Deeply interdisciplinary methods; Focusing on humans; Interaction physics; Information-centric interaction design; and Computation in context". 


The final two chapters attempt to discern what life will be like in the pervasive-computing world of the trillion-node network, without — wisely — being too specific. We are introduced to the concept of an 'information ecology' comprising 'life forms' (devices), 'currency' (information), architectures (information architecture and device architecture) and 'the environment' (human culture). Certain desirable properties emerge from such thinking, including resilience built on widespread redundancy, diversity and the embracing of stochastic processes.


ZDNet

Charles McLellan

10 Dec 2012

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A Tiny Ten Year Battery For The Internet Of Things

A Tiny Ten Year Battery For The Internet Of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Just as protocol standards needed to be established for the Internet to really take off, so must standards be established for what many are calling the next technology revolution: the Internet of Things.


Weightless is an organization made up of over 50 tech companies around the world whose goal is to establish standards for wireless, machine to machine (M2M) short to mid-range communication over a wide area network (WAN). Three major standards that Weightless wants to establish are chipsets that cost less than $2, have a range of up to 10km, and have a battery life of 10 years. The life-extension technology for the batteries doesn’t exist just yet, but Neul, the UK wireless network company that will provide the chipset, says it has a “roadmap” for the 10-year battery life.


Singularity Hub

Peter Murray

30 Nov 2012

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Neul Raises $5M To Connect The Internet Of Things Using TV White Space

Neul Raises $5M To Connect The Internet Of Things Using TV White Space | Web of Things | Scoop.it

UK-based Neul today announced a new $5 million investment from Mistui & Co. Ltd. subsidiary MGI, as well as existing investors DFJ Esprit, IQ Capital, Business Angels and founding company employees. Neul offers businesses and others a way to create a machine-to-machine (M2M) network using TV signal white space frequencies, which has the advantage of taking bandwidth-heavy, essential communication between devices away from congested frequencies like those used for Wi-Fi and GSM networks. The money will be used to help the firm expand its business, but Neul is more interested in the potential partnerships that investment from Mitsui brings along with it. (...)


Ultimately, what Neul is looking at is the opportunity arising in connected devices, even though other uses include rural broadband (which Neul is actually trialling as well). That focus is designed to capitalize on what Smyth says is a market with a huge amount of growth potential.


“There are all sorts of potential forecasts for M2M growth over the next 10 years or so, and the only thing they have in common is that they all see huge growth,” he said. “One, for example, suggests it’ll be a $150 billion market in the next five years. Another suggests it’ll be that size by 2020. The common theme is that it’ll be huge, probably around one-third the size of the current global mobile market.”


Neul is betting on its Weightless communication standard to define the entire category.

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Making The Internet Of Things A Reality: Mobility Meets Big Data In The Cloud -- "Triple Word Score"! - Forbes

Making The Internet Of Things A Reality: Mobility Meets Big Data In The Cloud -- "Triple Word Score"! - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Basically, four key elements are required for IoTs – a) Tagging Things b) Sensing Things c) Shrinking Things and d) Thinking Things. With advances in RFID, miniaturization and analytics, M2M makes the Internet of Things an increasingly tangible possibility. Think of such M2M communication as the “social collaboration” of machine-to-machine or machine-to-man.


Such technology is beginning to mature, whether it’s smart thermostats from startups like Nest Labs or Honeywell, or what’s being called “precision retailing”, where innovations in Big Data Analytics, combined with Mobility and GPS, allow tailored promotions to be offered to consumers on their mobile devices.


by Sanjay Poonen, SAP

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Mirror, Mirror, What's the Weather?

The industry of Web-connected devices, or what some analysts call the machine-to-machine market, is expected to vault in size in the coming years: CapGemini estimates that the world M2M market will be worth €27.4 billion (US$35 billion) by 2013.

...

The Cybertecture Mirror cost about HK$15 million (US$1.9 million) to develop, says Mr. Law, whose company began work on the product about three years ago. "With all the development costs we, don't see ourselves breaking even unless we make dramatically huge sales," says Mr. Law, who says the company took the project on as a "semi-innovation venture" and isn't likely to break even for two to three years.


He sees a future in other related products, such as backpacks that help parents track whether children arrive safely at school, or chairs that monitor your health.


The challenge for many of these products is how to bring them to consumers at an affordable price: The Cybertecture Mirror, for example, retails for US$5,000. The company is hoping to bring the price tag closer to US$1,000.


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Deutsche Telekom eyes ‘internet of things’ with new M2M portal

Deutsche Telekom eyes ‘internet of things’ with new M2M portal | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Deutsche Telekom has positioned itself as a potential leader in the continuing development of the ‘internet of things’, opening a new developer community platform for M2M communications.

 

Enmeshing everyday systems and appliances into the internet of things is seen as a natural progression of today’s increasingly connected lifestyle. With around five billion M2M devices currently operations worldwide and ten times as many are expected by 2020, the operator wants a slice of this pie.

 

Alarm systems, for instance, might be monitored online using the appropriate M2M API, which a developer could mesh with the operator’s API for SMS, using it to notify users by text message when the alarm is triggered. The same principle can be applied to toasters, pets, cars, clothing... you name it, there’s probably an M2M use case for it.

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Canada's Rogers sees growth in Internet of things

Canada's Rogers sees growth in Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Rogers Communications Inc , Canada's largest wireless company, says the "Internet of things" - fridges that write shopping lists and smoke alarms that send text messages - will be a C$400 million ($384 million) market in Canada by 2015 and that it wants a significant share.

 

"$400 million is just the start. It's just the beginning of what we think is an absolute explosion of opportunity in the M2M space," Robert Bruce, president of the company's wireless and cable units, said on the sidelines of a telecom conference on Monday.

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can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns

can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Things are getting a “voice,” says Ric Asselstine, chief executive officer of Terepac Corp., a Waterloo company that makes tiny electronics to put into objects to make them “smart” and compatible with the Internet of Things.

 

“At the end of the day, what we’re creating is information,” Asselstine said in a phone interview from Terepac’s headquarters on Colby Drive.

 

There is the potential for “trillions” of devices to be connected to the Internet of Things, he said, noting all of the objects in his office alone.

 

“The potential is literally boundless.”

 

Consumer products, medical devices and agricultural methods, such as managing crop moisture with sensors, can be a part of the Internet of Things.

 

Data about locations and conditions can be transmitted through these objects, Asselstine said.

 

[...]

 

ABI Research analyst Sam Lucero said privacy is already an issue.

 

“We’re already seeing tremendous privacy concerns around, for instance, smart meter data,” said Lucero, practice director of machine-to-machine connectivity for the New York-based tech trends firm.

 

“How is the owner of those devices and that data assured that the data is being used in agreed upon ways and that security is assured?”

 

This is going to be multiplied as different applications and devices become interconnected, he said.

 

TheRecord.com by LuAnn LaSalle

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Are You Ready for the Machine-to-Machine Revolution? - Forbes

Are You Ready for the Machine-to-Machine Revolution? - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Imagine a refrigerated cabinet or vending machine able to communicate its state, announcing if it is powered on, at the right temperature, well stocked, with the right product mix, at the right location, how shoppers interact with it, if it is due for routine maintenance and so on.

 

Now imagine millions of such machines worldwide, adding up to a sizeable business for a company. Imagine each machine offering shoppers the ability to pay for the product in multiple smart ways through other devices (smart phones, smart cards, touch screen, etc). Imagine the enterprise being able to remotely and dynamically tune the machine with advertising, pricing, promotions, bundling, language and currency. Imagine the machine tailoring an offer to a shopper that it recognizes as a loyal customer (if the shopper allows it).

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Machines may say: move over doctor

M2M uses a device (a surface or implanted sensor) to capture an event (e.g., BP, blood sugar, ECG) which is relayed to an application (software programme) that translates the captured event into meaningful information. This information is then analysed by an Artificial Intelligent System (AIS) reviewed by a physician and instructions for corrective measures (e.g., release of appropriate insulin from implanted pump) are sent.

 

The H2M interaction is possible today without a mouse, keyboard or touch screen. Gesture-based computing (MicrosoftKinect) is already being used by physically challenged patients. Unique virtual reality activities and simulated tasks using gestures are more exciting than traditional physiotherapy regimes. At present, an automatic blood analyser gives a printout of various tests on scores of patients. It is possible to instruct the analyser to directly send abnormal results through SMS to the primary consultant, an e.g. of M2H (machine to human) interaction. In “the Brave New World” these results can be sent automatically along with clinical data to an AIS which, in turn, would recommend appropriate action with a cc to a human.

 

Surface or embedded devices can send details of calorie consumption or sleep patterns to help consumers tailor their habits. A medical alert pendant can, in the case of patient incapacity due to a fall, pacemaker failure, etc, automatically inform a response centre from where a PC with AI (artificial intelligence) will contact the nearest ambulance.

 

via The Hindu : Opinion

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Who Will Control the Internet of Things?

"Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL ) filed a patent at the tail end of 2009 dubbed "Local Device Awareness," which describes automated connections between a number of close-range devices. Some potential applications could be device position targeting (think locating your keys) or proximity-based gaming."

 

"If Apple's patent seems overly broad, patent hoarder InterDigital (Nasdaq: IDCC ) has gone for specificity. It holds some 33 known patents covering machine-to-machine communication." 

 

"Motorola and Google seem to be behind in patents, with only one highly technical machine-to-machine patent showing up for Motorola Mobility, and none for Google. But as you'll soon see, the two companies might be hoping for a more open environment."

 

"IBM sees the Internet of things as a source of growth, and it recognizes that the best way to capitalize is to make it easy to adopt. Keeping the underlying framework open-source will undoubtedly improve competition and encourage startups, much as the growth of the public Internet led to an explosion of newly public companies. Let's hope that the growth of this new industry isn't hampered by patents, but we should also be wary of any new bubbles that might inflate."

 

via The Motley Fool

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