Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Ant-Sized Radios to Connect the World

Ant-Sized Radios to Connect the World | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new radio-chip device could offer a cost effective solution to the capital-intensive hurdles preventing the proliferation of the Internet of Things.

 

Engineers at Stanford University have developed what’s been described as an “ant-sized radio” that could allow two-way communication between any electronic device. Capable of operating at 24 billion cycles per second the chip, which is one tenth the size of a WiFi antenna, costs only pennies to produce. While being small and inexpensive are certainly boons for this type of device, designers admit that one of its most appealing characteristics is that it needs no external power. In fact, according to Stanford, the new chip is so “energy efficient that it gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna – no batteries required.”

. . . 

Being able to control devices remotely could be key to achieving better personal energy efficiency and changing the way we interact with technology. In the distant future connected devices could also be a training ground for weak AI systems where domestic duties like making coffee and running the dishwasher could be triggered by actions like turning on the shower or dimming the lights for bed.

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Om Malik: What the internet of things can learn from Minecraft and Lemmings

Once we have a home full of connected devices do we really want to individually manage all of them? Mike Kuniavsky, a principal in the Innovation Services Group at PARC, explains in this weeks podcast how we’re going to have to think differently about programming devices for the internet of things. Devices will need to know what they contain and how those elements might contribute to a certain scenario in the home.

 

For example when you want to watch a movie, you shouldn’t have to program 6 different devices in your home to tell them what they should do when you toggle on your movie setting, your devices should have some sense of what they are capable of and how to enter a set mode. As he did in his chat in February at our San Francisco Internet of Things meetup, Kuniavsky, likened this device behavior to video games like Minecraft or Lemmings, where preset general behaviors determines how the game unfolded as opposed to rigid and specific actions. He explains all this and more in the podcast. Check it out.

 

http://traffic.libsyn.com/gigaom/MIKE_KUNIAVSKY.mp3

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LIFX Is A Smartphone-Controlled Lightbulb | TechCrunch

LIFX Is A Smartphone-Controlled Lightbulb | TechCrunch | Web of Things | Scoop.it

LIFX, a Kickstarter-funded lightbulb you control from your iOS or Android device.


... you can change the brightness and color of the bulb right from your phone. You can also set it to go on and off at a certain time and come on when you get home.


the product isn’t shipping until March 2013.  ... The bulb itself costs $69.


Here’s what it does:

  • Control your lights from anywhere
  • Choose any brightness for a specific bulb, a room or your whole house
  • Create the colors to match any mood or decor
  • Get notifications such as Twitter, Facebook, Texts and more
  • Reduce your energy consumption and save money
  • Visualise your music with animated colors
  • Make an impression at your next dinner party
  • Get creative with colors and effects
  • Create a night light for your kids
  • Security mode when you’re on holidays
  • Create groups of lights
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China: Why Internet of Things awareness should be on your corporate due diligence agenda

China: Why Internet of Things awareness should be on your corporate due diligence agenda | Web of Things | Scoop.it

One factor alone - China - should be making western political and business leaders wake up, sit up, take notice and put the “Internet of Things” firmly into all their political and corporate business planning cycles.


The outgoing Chinese Politburo certainly recognised the transformative impact of billions of cheap, small, very smart, intercommunicating sensor devices - the miniature building blocks of the Internet of Things.


This is about the capability of every object to have a unique identifier (URL) using chip, sensor and communications technology to intercommunicate with its environment, other objects and living things (including humans) - and also to make autonomous decisions. This'll be hugely disruptive to us all.


The technology embracing Chinese government is now three years into building its Internet of Things programme which last year it reckoned to grow annually at 30% to become a £48bn market within China by 2013..


Dr John Riley is passionate about improving the innovation process, having first hand experience of large enterprises, small business, academia, and government.  More...

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Dragonfly spy drone technology could make data centers more green

Dragonfly spy drone technology could make data centers more green | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Tiny ribbons that generate electricity when flexed and flex when stimulated with electricity have been developed to flap the wings of mechanical dragonfly spy drones, but the technology can also find uses ranging from powering iPods and cell phones...


Tiny ribbons that generate electricity when flexed and flex when stimulated with electricity have been developed to flap the wings of mechanical dragonfly spy drones, but the technology can also find uses ranging from powering iPods and cell phones to charging batteries by converting to electricity the vibration of devices deployed in data centers. (...)


Researchers at Princeton University have embedded these brittle ribbons in silicone rubber, allowing them to flex and also protect them from environments where they might be deployed, such as in shoes - to capture mechanical energy as people walk in them - or implanted within humans - to capture the motion of lungs to power pacemakers. (...)


Power generation using the PZT ribbons is similar to solar cells except that solar cells require sunshine. "Here you need to continuously generate motion to power things," he says. PZT is also more efficient than solar cells, which capture 25% of the energy they absorb. PZT captures 80%, McAlpine says.

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DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body

DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The biodegradable electronics are made using silicon and magnesium encased inside a silk layer. The qualities of the silk determine how long the system lasts before degrading, and since silicon and magnesium are both found in our bodies (in tiny quantities), DARPA assures that the technology shouldn't be harmful, whether it dissolves inside or outside the human body.


In medicine, dissolving electronics could be inserted into a wound before closing it up, and could monitor healing or apply heat to the damaged area to speed the process. Then, after a few weeks, the system would simply break apart, which would mean no second surgery to remove it and no more healing needed.


... dissolving electronics could mean a lot less e-waste, since your old phones, computers, toasters and what-have-you would biodegrade instead of sitting in a landfill. That, and instead of wearable electronics, why don't we just skip on over to embeddable bio-circuitry? Google Glass is fine to start, but I'm waiting for the disposable contact lens version.

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Edward Wang's curator insight, June 19, 2013 9:28 AM

Reminds me of Stefanie's idea of compostable 3d printing.

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Memristors offer technology of the future

Memristors offer technology of the future | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The transparent electronics that were pioneered at Oregon State University may find one of their newest applications as a next-generation replacement for some uses of non-volatile flash memory, a multi-billion dollar technology nearing its limit of small size and information storage capacity.


This resistive random access memory, or RRAM, is referred to by some researchers as a "memristor." Products using this approach could become even smaller, faster and cheaper than the silicon transistors that have revolutionized modern electronics – and transparent as well.


Transparent electronics offer potential for innovative products that don't yet exist, like information displayed on an automobile windshield, or surfing the web on the glass top of a coffee table.


via  Machines Like Us

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A Real Internet Of Things For The Developing World (And Burning Man)

A Real Internet Of Things For The Developing World (And Burning Man) | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Aria has a grand idea: creating an Internet-like network of autonomous aerial vehicles (AAVs)  that could one day allow someone to make a one-to-one sale with anyone in the world or send medication quickly to where it’s needed most, simply by delivering goods on a flying autonomous vehicle to its destination. But before Aria (that’s the name of Matternet’s open-source group) does that, it’s teaming up with ReAllocate--an organization that’s building a network of designers and engineers who want to use their expertise to work on humanitarian issues--for an experimental project at Burning Man (if Aria can secure tickets; that’s still up in the air).

 

After the Burning Man pilot, ReAllocate plans to bring the shipping container project, dubbed "Startup Country," to Oakland to create a portable kitchen for food entrepreneurs. "We’re transforming shipping containers into innovation centers," says Dr. Mike North, the founder of ReAllocate. "We want to take them into the developing world, bring people from the community in, and facilitate them developing their own social enterprises."

 

As with the Burning Man project, Aria can use these shipping containers in the developing world as ground stations where it can swap batteries and payload. "The ground stations are like the routers of the Internet. They can extend range and capacity of the drones," explains Arturo Pelayo, the co-founder of Aria.

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Smart suit improves physical endurance

Smart suit improves physical endurance | Web of Things | Scoop.it
: Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering announced that it has received a $2.6 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a smart suit that helps improve physical endurance for...

Via Wildcat2030
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O.System - The future of personal electronics by Peter Krige - RCA IDE

O.System - The future of personal electronics by Peter Krige - RCA IDE | Web of Things | Scoop.it

“In 2025, consumer electronics will no longer be the same.”


Purchased through the O.System they will allow each and every one of us to customise our electronic products online, adding personal touches. This is a project by Peter Krige, Alexander du Preez and Hannes Harms, students of Innovation Design Engineering at the Royal College of Art.


Via Vavdo, Andrea Graziano
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The Internet of Things: the next tech revolution

The Internet of Things: the next tech revolution | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Alicia Asín Pérez, CEO and co-founder of Libelium, is a computer engineer focused on how the Internet of Things can change our world, starting with the Smart Cities.

 

The term Internet of Things refers to the next generation the Internet in which not only computers, not even people with machines, but each other everyday objects are connected. If we add sensors to objects, the applications of this seemingly simple technological change are universal. Road will divert traffic when they detect an accident, fire fighters notified automatically when there is a forest fire, foods will remind us when they are about to expire, bathtubs call an ambulance when someone slips and entire cities adapt and respond dynamically to the needs of the environment. The Internet of Things has the ability to impact every corner of our planet.

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Electronic tagging system could replace barcodes

Electronic tagging system could replace barcodes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A team from Imec’s Holst Center in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, has developed a high-performance radio frequency identification (RFID) tag that could be cheaply mass-produced and prevents data transfer from being interrupted.

 

The researchers believe their technology could be crucial to the development of cheap, high-performance RFID.

 

‘Item-level tagging could allow vendors to implement automatic billing and inventory management,’ Kris Myny, an organic circuitry researcher at Imec, told The Engineer.

 

‘On top of these applications, such RFID tags could be integrated with sensors for smart RFID tags. In this way, they could be integrated into food packaging to provide customers with information on freshness or characteristics of this product.’

 

via The Engineer

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How the 'internet of things' could radically change local government

"The IoT is linked to a number of other emerging ideas, such as smart cities, pervasive sensing and machine-to-machine communication – all of which are being tentatively explored by businesses and government. Regardless of what name it is given, this merger of the physical and virtual worlds could allow local authorities to deliver much more efficient services, reducing waste and unlocking reams of useful data: think water mains loaded with clusters of sensors that can alert engineers to leaks or blockages, or lampposts that can detect light levels and save energy by turning themselves off. Sensors could even be used to check the effectiveness of waste removal and recycling services, or help the police locate stolen goods."

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Welcoming plants to the Web of Thing

Welcoming plants to the Web of Thing | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Researchers are wiring plants to harness their intelligence and use them as organic biosensors.

 

"Italian researchers are building a network of connected "cyborg" plants (plantborgs? cyplants? cyberflora?) to use as organic biosensors. The plants are embedded with a tiny electronic device to monitor things like pollution levels, overuse of chemicals, temperature, parasites, acid rain, and communicate the data through a wireless network back to the lab."

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Trimtab-in-Training 's curator insight, February 26, 2014 5:21 AM

"Those roots sprawling out through the ground and branches reaching up into the sky are plants' eyes and ears, constantly monitoring natural chemical and physical stimuli to survive—that intelligence is why plants have been able to adapt and evolve on Earth for so many millennia, Vitaletti explains. Plants give off an electrical signal when they interact with environmental stimuli, and now scientists want to analyze those signals to glean insights from the cybernetic flora."

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Lockitron launches iPhone-controlled keyless lock that pings you when someone knocks

Lockitron launches iPhone-controlled keyless lock that pings you when someone knocks | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Lockitron has just outed a new cellphone-controlled keyless entry system, sporting a raft of new bells and wireless whistles.


Lockitron exceeded its self-imposed minimum order limit by 250 percent in less than a day, so if you'd like to pre-order one at the current $149 price and get it for March 2013, hit the source.

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DVICE: Throwable camera sensor acts as a smartphone-controlled scout

DVICE: Throwable camera sensor acts as a smartphone-controlled scout | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Created by Bounce Imaging, the tennis ball-sized device is equipped with six cameras that allow it to send back a 360-degree view of its environment. Those cameras can take up to 2 photos per second, after which the images are sent back to the user's smartphone. The device is also fitted with sensors that give it the ability to send back environmental data such as temperature and the presence of dangerous gases. According to the company's founder, Francisco Aguilar, future versions of the device will also feature a Geiger counter, offering data on radioactivity levels in environments such as damaged nuclear plants.


See video.

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IoT ripe for adoption in India: Study

In fact, companies across multiple industries are already using Internet of Things technologies to track and manage physical assets, improve the customer experience, enhance supply chain visibility and more.


The global October 2012 commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting “Building Value from Visibility: 2012 Enterprise Internet of Things Adoption Outlook” showed the following results:


There is a positive perception of the term IoT in India, and 92% of respondents agree with a common definition provided of what IoT solutions are.


India Leads the World in Implementing IoT Solutions


30% of organizations in India already have an IoT solution in place as compared to 15% of organizations globally.


7 in 10 organizations in India are planning to implement IoT Solutions within the next two years as compared to 5 in 10 organizations globally. ...


While supply chain visibility and asset tracking are the top issues organizations hope to address with these solutions, the top benefits for surveyed enterprises in India include: improved customer service, supply chain visibility and cost efficiencies.

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A social Internet of Things. How should our buildings and belongings communicate?

A social Internet of Things. How should our buildings and belongings communicate? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Social Media Week is heading into its last few days and there’s been more events than you could shake a Web-connected stick at.

In London, the Imagination agency hosted an event entitled ‘Socialising the Internet of Things’ with Dr Jon Rogers, course director of Product Design at the University of Dundee, Mark Coyle Editor, BBC London 2012, Online and Dave Patten, Head of New Media at the Science Museum.

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Intro to Interactive Newsprint

An introduction to the Interactive Newsprint Project, which is examining new forms of journalism using printed electronics.


via paidcontent.org

Lots of people are trying to bridge the divide between paper and the internet. Some efforts include augmented-reality playthings that enliven pages and QR codes that introduce hyperlinks to print, while many expect e-readers will evolve in to flexible, hi-res, connected digital “paper.”


But what if the printed word could become digital today? That’s what a project called Interactive Newsprint is promising.


An eight-year-old Cambridge, UK, company called Novalia, working with the Universities of Central Lancashire, Dundee and Surrey, is deploying its electronics-enabled paper concept toward newspapers.


A demo edition of Johnston Press’ Lancashire Evening Post includes printed “buttons” that, when pressed, play audio readings of stories; plus Facebook likes, story ratings and votes. (...)


“Being able to place the paper in the middle of the internet of things opens up a whole new ballpark of the ways that we can tell stories and collect data — who’s holding the paper, how are they interacting?”


Continued here.

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Cheap, Pressure-Sensing ‘Electronic Skin’ - IEEE Spectrum

Cheap, Pressure-Sensing ‘Electronic Skin’ - IEEE Spectrum | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Seoul researchers have developed an easy-to-fabricate, membrane-based strain gauge system that’s as sensitive (and almost as flexible) as human skin...

 

... sensitive enough to feel the fall of water droplets, a human pulse in the wrist, and even the whisper-light tread of a lady-bug walking across the “electronic skin.”

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"Flex of a Finger" Biometric Control

ReadwriteWeb writes:

 

"Microsoft applied for a patent on electromyography (EMG) controlled computing on Thursday, suggesting that a future smart wristwatch or armband might simply detect a user’s muscle movements and interpret them as gestures or commands. The “Wearable Electromyography-Based Controller” could also use a network of small sensors attached to the body, all communicating wirelessly with a central hub.

 

Microsoft first treated the human body as just another input device when it launched the Kinect sensor, which tracks a user’s face and body via an onboard camera. Computing via brainwaves has also been proposed as an alternative method of input. Finally, EMG-controlled devices, such as prosthetics, have been talked about for some time. Still, all three methods have their challenges.Comments

In the future, Microsoft apparently believes, people may simply twitch their fingers or arms to control a computer, game console or mobile device.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/microsoft-tech-to-control-computers-with-a-flex-of-a-finger.php

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Tapping Earth's magnetic field for indoor navigation

Tapping Earth's magnetic field for indoor navigation | Web of Things | Scoop.it

While outdoor navigation has been mastered with GPS satellites and cell phone triangulation, indoor navigation has proven more tricky.


Now, a group of researchers at the University of Oulu in Finland has tapped the Earth's magnetic field to create an indoor positioning system (IPS).  The researchers say their approach was inspired by studying the way homing pigeons and lobsters use anomalies in the magnetic field to navigate their travels.

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Tiny, energy-scavenging generators could have big impact

Tiny, energy-scavenging generators could have big impact | Web of Things | Scoop.it

They're far from the only ones working on tiny, energy-harvesting generators, but a group of researchers from the University of Michigan may well be farther along than most.


Unlike some similar devices, their generator is able to scavenge even the slightest bits of energy from arbitrary, non-periodic vibrations in everything from bridges to the human body.


That may not add up to a huge amount of energy, but the researchers say the generators are able to scrape together enough to keep a wrist watch or a wireless sensor running, or potentially power even a pacemaker by the person's own body movements.


Of course, the device likely won't be powering anything beyond the lab anytime soon -- the researchers are still going through various prototypes using different types of energy conversion, and are naturally working to patent it as well.

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Thin Film and the business of printed electronics - PARC10

Thin Film and the business of printed electronics - PARC10 | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Davor Sutija, CEO of Thin Film said ThinFilm is in the business of printed electronics. The company is working towards creating a low-power, printable, rewritable memory that uses a non-toxic polymer and can be attached to virtually anything. "Your stuff will talk to you in three to five years," he said.

Like the Kopin and Motorola Solutions headset, ThinFilm's product is the culmination of multiple efforts. PARC built the logic, ThinFilm specialized in memory, another company created the display, the batteries are being developed in Berkeley. The initiative started by identifying a potentially growing consumer need for easily reproduced technology. "The 'Internet of Things' will involve hundreds of billions of items," Sutija offered.

 

After dreaming up ThinFilm's concept, it was then a matter of sharing that idea with others and determining where their expertise could fit in. Sutija believes that "printed electronics will be as disruptive as search was ten years ago," and while the company's products are still getting off the ground, ThinFilm would certainly not be what it is today without the benefit of an open innovation approach.

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"The instrumentation of everyday life"

"Meals eaten? Hours of sleep slept? Distances traveled? TV shows and books watched? There are many more parts of our lives that can be wired up to Facebook or other social networks.


The instrumentation of everyday life may sound frightening to many people, but so did posting photos of yourself online or using a debit card (at all) just a few years ago."

 

via ReadWriteWeb

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