Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal

Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal | Web of Things | Scoop.it
And IoT will extend, expand and augment just about every conceivable installation of home, building, commercial, industrial and infrastructure automation. Smart meters may have been one of the first applications of IoT in energy, but it will soon be overshadowed by the impact(s) of devices as lowly as thermostats and light bulbs being elevated with intelligence and connected. Which brings me to this connection thing that seems to have so many people distracted. IoT solutions do NOT mean exclusively wireless.

To be sure, wireless connections will be a critical part of connecting the next generations of unattended devices, but, so too will wireline be an important part of the rich fabric of the IoT. What will they be connected to? Most importantly … YOU. As a private citizen, professional or public servant, your work, your play, your life, will be augmented by having some number of unattended devices monitoring – and perhaps controlling – one or more of the things, places, processes in your lives.

Boston Business Journal
Christopher Rezendes, President, INEX Advisors
18 Dec 2012
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The Internet of things: Smart houses, smart traffic, smart health

In the same way as we put ID chips on products, we can attach sensors to ourselves and allow them to communicate via the Web to other objects around us. The health service is currently testing sensors on elderly patients living at home. The sensors can monitor pulse and blood pressure.


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Major changes in the energy sector in recent years mean that the need for smart, flexible energy is increasing, and that energy production and storage facilities will have to become more coordinated. Current methods mean that our electricity is supplied by large, commercial energy companies from coal, gas and nuclear power stations.


So far, these centrally controlled systems have not needed to communicate much with the outside world. In the future, however, distributed energy sources provided by multiple suppliers will take over. These sources will come from renewable energy such as hydro, wind and solar.

 

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Norwegians are in favour of the service, since we think that the environment and saving energy are important. Americans, on the other hand, are sceptical: 'Are the energy companies going to see inside my fridge?!' With a box on the wall, information will flow both ways, but exactly what data will go out?

 

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Electric cars will be able to connect to the smart future grid. Each car will contain a unique identifying SIM/MIM card, like the card in your mobile.


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When vehicles and road infrastructure come online and communicate with each other, the range of opportunities will be enormous. When your car is connected to the Internet of Traffic, you will be able to receive information about everything that is happening around you. How many other cars are on the road? Which is the quickest route, taking traffic into account, and how fast should you drive if you want the next traffic light to be on green?

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Drive by wire

The more fascinating thing is what happens when vehicles start to communicate. Paul Newman, head of the Mobile Robotics Unit at Oxford proposes that your vehicle should learn your routes; one day, he imagines, a little light comes on indicating that it's ready to handle the drive itself. Newman wants to reclaim his time ("It's ridiculous to think that we're condemned to a future of congestion, accidents, and time-wasting"), but since GPS is too limited to guide an automated car – it doesn't work well inside cities, it's not fine-grained enough for parking lots – there's talk of guide boxes. Newman would rather take cues from the existing infrastructure the way humans do. But give vehicles the ability to communicate and share information – maps, pictures, and sensor data. "I don't need a funky French car bubble car. I want today's car with cameras and a 3G connection."

 

via newswireless.net - by Wendy M Grossman

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'Smart' cities aim to predict -- and manage -- traffic future

'Smart' cities aim to predict -- and manage -- traffic future | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Look at what IBM is currently doing in the Chinese city of Zhenjiang. Using its Intelligent Operations Center for Smarter Cities, Big Blue aims to help the city of three million use analytics to not only enable real-time bus monitoring and management, but to simulate traffic flow patterns ahead of time. By anticipating traffic problems before they happen, IBM’s Intelligent Transportation technology is designed to improve the city’s public transit system and “increase traffic throughput” … in other words, make it possible for more traffic to flow through streets without the need to build more roads or otherwise radically change the existing infrastructure."

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Space invaders | The Economist

Space invaders | The Economist | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"America’s Intel and Britain’s ARM have long dominated different bits of the global chip market. Now each is attacking the other’s stronghold"

 

"The battle is not just about dividing up territories already occupied; it is also about finding new lands to conquer. Both firms are keen to stake claims on the largely uncolonised and still somewhat notional terrain known as the “internet of things”: the myriad processors in industrial machinery, consumer goods and infrastructure, ever more of which will communicate with each other and with distant computers. Cisco, a giant American maker of networking gear, estimates that by 2015 there may be almost 15 billion internet-connected devices, up from 7.5 billion in 2010. Whereas the market for more phones and other personal computing devices is limited by the number of persons the planet has to offer, things, being more numerous than people, provide a lot more long-term room for growth."

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Now Even Lions Are Sending Texts

Now Even Lions Are Sending Texts | Web of Things | Scoop.it
A new project uses cell phone technology to monitor Kenyan wildlife, and to get around the high cost of satellite infrastructure.
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Verizon boss stands ready to reap M2M rewards

"Verizon chief executive Lowell McAdam said that the promise of machine-to-machine connections — including vending machines, buildings and healthcare sensors — is ready to be realised."

 

via Emerging Tech | ZDNet UK

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Wireless Sensor Networks Provide New Levels of Stealth

Wireless Sensor Networks Provide New Levels of Stealth | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"A wireless sensor network that Lockheed Martin calls the Self-Powered Ad-hoc Network (SPAN) is being deployed in the energy sector to monitor infrastructure such as pipelines. Their low energy use, and self-organizing mesh network, makes them ideal for ground surveillance. To aid in their deployment, the low-cost sensors are being camouflaged in housings that look like rocks, and the sensors harvest energy sources from the surrounding environment to extend their battery life.

 

The persistent surveillance system is monitored and controlled from a single machine that processes aggregate readings. The smart sensor network can cue a camera or unmanned aerial vehicle to further study an area or call an engineer when a pipeline or bridge structure is in danger of fracture.

 

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Futurist's Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things

Futurist's Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"There are so many ways that an Internet of Things could impact people’s lives that it is hard to describe everything. Distilling it to a few key areas helps define what the scope of an Internet of Things could be: infrastructure (buildings and utilities), consumer (cars and homes), health care and businesses (consumer products and retail locations).

 

Weather-related sensors could help agriculture by monitoring the moisture in the air or ground and give farmer’s warning about droughts. Smart buildings can provide enhanced security for the people that enter them or warning on disasters such as earthquakes. Connected cars can improve traffic flows or allow functions to be controlled remotely. Items within the home (such as the toaster) can be controlled and monitored and even connected to each other.

 

Health care is an interesting avenue for the Internet of Things. Certain aspects of the body could be connected to the Internet. Heart sensors could give patients and doctors data to prevent disease. Sensors that monitor white blood cells could give cancer or AIDS patients warning of a relapse.

 

The scope and impact of the Internet of Things is almost limitless. It is just up to the innovators of the world to be creative and find ways to make it work." 

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Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes

Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Street Bump automatically transmits the presence of rough roads to city workers, helping improve the timeliness of road repairs.

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Technology Strategy Board invests in Internet of Things

Technology Strategy Board invests in Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Graham Fisher, a Director at Cambridge Wireless, welcomed the efforts made by the Technology Strategy Board. He told TechEye that there are plenty of opportunities to be had with an Internet of Things, though there is more that needs to be done in terms of infrastructure in order to create the ecosystem the TSB is striving for.


“Rural connectivity could be an issue as it is necessary that ubiquitous internet is available in order to create efficient systems,” Fisher told TechEye. “For efficient telehealth and smart metering this all falls down if you are not able to provide ubiquitous connections.”


Then again, there are "problems with a lack of full connections in many parts of the country,” Fisher says. “We need to push forward with the roll out of LTE and use of white spaces as soon as possible to support this.”

 

Read more: http://news.techeye.net/internet/technology-strategy-board-invests-in-internet-of-things#ixzz1jZkvlAJz"

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5 Ways The Smart City Will Change How We Live In 2012

5 Ways The Smart City Will Change How We Live In 2012 | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Thoughts on how the future of the smart city will impact daily life and efficiency of our cities, from IBM's Smarter Buildings division.

 

via Co.EXIST

 

highlights: http://diigo.com/0m761

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The Internet Gets Physical

The Internet Gets Physical | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Across many industries, products and practices are being transformed by communicating sensors and computing intelligence. The smart industrial gear includes jet engines, bridges and oil rigs that alert their human minders when they need repairs, before equipment failures occur. Computers track sensor data on operating performance of a jet engine, or slight structural changes in an oil rig, looking for telltale patterns that signal coming trouble.

 

SENSORS on fruit and vegetable cartons can track location and sniff the produce, warning in advance of spoilage, so shipments can be rerouted or rescheduled. Computers pull GPS data from railway locomotives, taking into account the weight and length of trains, the terrain and turns, to reduce unnecessary braking and curb fuel consumption by up to 10 percent."

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Duncan Jefferies: How the 'internet of things' could radically change local government

"The IoT is linked to a number of other emerging ideas, such as smart cities, pervasive sensing and machine-to-machine communication – all of which are being tentatively explored by businesses and government. Regardless of what name it is given, this merger of the physical and virtual worlds could allow local authorities to deliver much more efficient services, reducing waste and unlocking reams of useful data: think water mains loaded with clusters of sensors that can alert engineers to leaks or blockages, or lampposts that can detect light levels and save energy by turning themselves off. Sensors could even be used to check the effectiveness of waste removal and recycling services, or help the police locate stolen goods."

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Authenticate or Die - Forbes

Authenticate or Die - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet:

"That anonymity—one of the few serious flaws in the design of the Internet—is giving the bad guys plenty of cover and keeping society as a whole from fully benefiting from what the Internet has to offer.

 

And this situation is only going to get worse as we move to what’s been dubbed the “Internet of Things.”

 

It’s a world where the line between what’s a computer and what’s not a computer gets increasingly blurred, and every device we have looks, smells, and behaves more and more like a computer. The smartphone is the most obvious example, but now you can add things such as cars, medical devices, household appliances, almost every device in your a/v cabinet and more. Increasingly, the things in our everyday infrastructure are gaining the intelligence and the processing power of computers, which means they’re also vulnerable to attack."

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