Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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The Wi-Fi in your home can track your moves like Xbox Kinect

The Wi-Fi in your home can track your moves like Xbox Kinect | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Want to switch off the living room lights from bed, change channels while washing dishes, or turn the heat up from the couch? A team at the University of Washington has rigged a standard Wi-Fi home network to detect your movements anywhere in the home and convert them into commands to control connected devices.

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CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers

CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A little less sexy than the latest smart TVs perhaps, but drawing significant crowds at CES, were displays of kitchens and kitchen appliances. It is now a very realistic possibility that we will soon (after years of hype) be using fridges that assess when we are running low on certain food items and automatically reorder through our regular online retailer of choice. Given coverage of retail results over the last week and the development of this sort of technology, Morrisons may have even more reason to regret its slow progress in online retail when compared to the likes of Tesco. Another interesting appliance was a dishwasher from LG that liaises with your energy supplier to ensure that it only switches itself on at a time of day when electricity is cheap.


There are a very large number of stands exhibiting smaller scale, wearable computing such as health and fitness monitors and smartwatches (often combined). One of the most interesting of these is the Pebble smartwatch which was the subject of much excitement at CES today. This hotly-anticipated smartwatch was created thanks to $15m of crowdsourced funding (Kickstarter's most successful project to date) and is being made available this month. The Pebble has an e-ink display similar to those found on e-readers and lasts seven days on one battery charge. The screen is able to display a multitude of apps as well as tell the time. Third-party developers will be able to create apps for the watch which can pair up with smartphones running Google's Android software or Apple's iOS. Perhaps of more importance longer term are the devices that will help us monitor our health; not only heartbeat, blood pressure and so on but food intake and amount of exercise.


A huge number of acres of exhibition space was taken by car manufacturers. It feels to me that much of the focus in recent years has been around using technology to improve the quality of the drive as opposed to the in-car experience. But that is clearly about to change. Many manufacturers were displaying technology that can seamlessly link car, smartphone and location data to deliver an enhanced experience. For example, Ford were showing a car that would read your text messages to you as you are driving. Others demonstrated how by synching car and smartphone, the music being played in your car could automatically adapt to driving conditions. One soundtrack for driving faster on an open road, another for city driving.


by Stewart Easterbrook

10 Jan 2013


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Ecovacs Winbot Puts Robotic Muscle Into Window Cleaning

Ecovacs Winbot Puts Robotic Muscle Into Window Cleaning | Web of Things | Scoop.it

You’ve got a robot that vacuums your carpet, and it doesn’t even scare the cat too much anymore. That’s progress, right? So where do you turn next in your quest for automated domestic help? How about a robot that does windows?

The Ecovacs Winbot cleans both sides of a window at the same time, with a two-part system. A driver that contains the motor sits on one side of the glass while a follower unit goes on the other side. The two units are held together with a powerful, variable-strength magnet. The robot senses its position on the window and follows a zig-zag path to cover the entire area. A remote is also included to allow manual direction of the robot.

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Home Energy Management: 2012 Status Report

Home Energy Management: 2012 Status Report | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Home energy management in 2012, like every other year, finds us somewhere between the Flintstones and the Jetsons. There are nationwide television commercials that show a mom remotely turning on kitchen lights for her child using her smart phone. Two-way smart thermostats that can be controlled via the internet fly off store shelves. But dishwashers and refrigerators are hardly communicating with a utility to turn themselves on when energy is cheapest.

Progress is slow and steady in the home energy management and connected home industry. But mostly slow. Companies with solid analytics that can offer immediate savings to utilities without having to spend too much saw progress in 2012. But the notion of a home area network still seems like the Jetsons. The internet of things just hasn’t quite made it to the average home.

Greentech Media
Katherine Tweed
17 Dec 2012
ddrrnt's insight:

Quite a few examples in this report worth perusing if you're interested in smart grid developments.

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No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking

No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is the long-prophesied phenomenon of everyday devices talking to one another—and us—online, creating new behaviors and efficiencies. It turned out to be vaporware.

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The rise of the machines has begun: Steve Sande’s household fan is now self-aware. Sande, a Colorado-based tech writer, had noticed that his cat, Ruby, was suffering on hot summer days. His house doesn’t have air-conditioning, and he wasn’t always around to turn on the fan.

So Sande bought a new gizmo called the WeMo Switch, which connects to the Internet so you can turn on an outlet remotely. It’s also programmable. Using the free web service If This Then That, Sande created a script that monitors information from Yahoo Weather. If the temperature in his neighborhood hits 85 degrees, the fan turns itself on and cools the house. “This entire thing,” he says, “revolves around a 17-year-old cat.”

I love this story, because it illustrates something fascinating: The Internet of Things is finally arriving—and it’s bubbling up from the grassroots.

The Internet of Things is the long-prophesied phenomenon of everyday devices talking to one another—and us—online, creating odd new behaviors and efficiencies. Fridges that order food when you’re almost out of butter! Houses that sense when you’re gone and power down!

Back in the ’90s, big companies built systems to do tricks like this, but they were expensive, hard to use, and vendor-specific. The hype eventually boiled away. The Internet of Things turned out to be vaporware.

Until the past few years, that is, when the landscape shifted from below.


Via Wildcat2030
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Are you ready for appliances that are smarter than you?

Are you ready for appliances that are smarter than you? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

LG's Smart Thinq connected appliances were all the rage last year at CES and just last week the hit stores in South Korea. The connected fridge is coming soon to the U.S. either next month or in the first quarter of next year.


The idea was that when someone got home from the grocery store they could choose to tell the fridge what was inside using a touchscreen or they could scan a bar code on their receipt that would contain the information about their purchases.


In this ideal world, the fridge would then be able to suggest recipes for the family based on their weight goals, age, gender and whatnot. If the consumer selected a fridge-offered recipe the appliance could shoot the recipe to the Smart Thinq over and it could preheat. All of the connectivity occurs via Wi-Fi, and the controls are based in the phone and in the touchscreen.


For people like me who grocery shop against a meal plan for a week,the recipe features don’t sound all that appealing, but other features such as calorie counting or notifying me of expiration dates are pretty cool. And if grocery stores participate – assuming we get some data standards for food — then the fridge could identify when certain items are out and order them for home delivery.


@ddrrnt -- FRIDGE KNOWS BEST !


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Lockitron launches iPhone-controlled keyless lock that pings you when someone knocks

Lockitron launches iPhone-controlled keyless lock that pings you when someone knocks | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Lockitron has just outed a new cellphone-controlled keyless entry system, sporting a raft of new bells and wireless whistles.


Lockitron exceeded its self-imposed minimum order limit by 250 percent in less than a day, so if you'd like to pre-order one at the current $149 price and get it for March 2013, hit the source.

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Ars asks: What home automation project should we tackle?

Ars asks: What home automation project should we tackle? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

For over a decade now, we’ve heard about “The Internet of Things”—the idea that all of my home’s electronics can communicate with each other via the Internet. I’ll be able to control my toaster from my smartphone, or have my washing machine text me when it’s done. But there are relatively few devices out there that can actually do this.


A new Silicon Valley startup is hoping to change all that. Electric Imp is a Wi-Fi chip embedded into a SD-card sized case that is then connected via circuit board to any sort of electronics device. They currently sell “dev kits” for about $20 to $30.


The idea is to make home automation really easy—simple enough for a DIY newbie like me. Electric Imp takes its proprietary hardware and puts on a simplified programming interface, along the lines of Apple’s Automator or IFTTT.

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The connected home: why your fridge may soon be sending you messages

The connected home: why your fridge may soon be sending you messages | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"When the dishwasher has finished with your plates, rather than using more energy to blast hot air at them to dry them, Siemens' appliances instead use zeolites, which heat up when they come into contact with water: the heat they use dries the plates and cutlery inside the dishwasher, reducing electricity.

 

What about a cup of coffee? Your coffeemaker will be able to tell you, again via the app, if it's got enough beans in it or if you need to add some more. But what if it goes wrong? Via the tablet app, you will be able to connect by video to customer support, where the person on the other end of the camera will be able to access your device remotely to tell you what the problem is."

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Energy Harvesting Market - Global Forecast & Analysis (2012 - 2017) - Military & Aerospace Electronics

Energy Harvesting Market - Global Forecast & Analysis (2012 - 2017) - Military & Aerospace Electronics | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Energy harvesting is the process of collecting the ambient energy from the surroundings like light, heat, vibration, and electromagnetic radiation, and converting it into usable electrical energy for power portable electrical devices; this can be done without using the batteries. This technology efficiently collects the ambient energy that we usually discard and merits a lot of attention. It is also known as energy scavenging or power scavenging. Energy harvesting market covers the various sources of energy harvesting that are used by the energy harvesting technologies.


This report describes the different energy harvesting technologies such as light energy harvesting, thermoelectric, vibration, electromagnetic, fluid, motion, and other types like RF and bio energy harvesting. In the overall market for energy harvesting, light harvesting contributes for the largest percentage share, due to the availability of huge source of solar energy. This report forecasts the energy harvesting technologies market from 2012 to 2017.

 

The report :http://bit.ly/ScijQd

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ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge

ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things represents a big opportunity to drive growth for both UK and worldwide economies. According to IMS Research, governments will play a key role in defining the regulations that will propel shipments for M2M communications modules to more than 118 million units by 2016, especially in the automotive sector.

 ...

The first forum will meet on August 24 in the UK and will be chaired by Gary Atkinson, who leads the Internet of Things initiative at ARM.

 

“In the next five years, over £2.4 billion will be spent in the UK on smart home energy management devices, ranging from smart meters themselves to in-home devices that are connected to them. This is a great example of an Internet of Things application, but is only a fraction of the market that will open up over the next 15-20 years,” said Atkinson.

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The internet of things: how connected devices can drive sustainability

The internet of things: how connected devices can drive sustainability | Web of Things | Scoop.it

... let's imagine how objects with connected online identities can actually drive sustainability. Imagine a portfolio of household good products – your laundry detergent and your dishwater – communicating with you to give a personal record that can help reduce water and energy use. Or imagine medical devices like glucose monitors that come with dietary advice and medicines that provide online side-effect alerts and tests. Or wine and spirits bottles that provide not just terroir history and cocktail tips but also personalised healthy drinking advice.

 

Established peer-to-peer services like AirBnB and the US private car sharing/rental company Relay Rides already point to how connected objects can promote sustainability. In the case of Relay Rides, subscribers who need access to cars but don't want to own a vehicle rent other people's private cars on a journey-by-journey basis. Now spin that model forward to multiple shared ownership of a single vehicle equipped with a digital identity connected to all the owners. The vehicle becomes the hub of an online network that allows, for example, four different owners, to effectively share that one car.

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A Rosie Future: Jetsons -Like Gadgets with "Ambient Intelligence" Are Key to Smart Homes and Cities: Scientific American

A Rosie Future: Jetsons -Like Gadgets with "Ambient Intelligence" Are Key to Smart Homes and Cities: Scientific American | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Information collected by AI software from sensors in homes and cities could identify and address health, safety and environmental problems without human intervention...

Via Wildcat2030
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Wireless LED Lights That Don’t Shine Like LED Lights

Wireless LED Lights That Don’t Shine Like LED Lights | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Released last fall to the adoration of design blogs, Hue provides enough innovations to the way we light up our homes to make you long for the days when a wall-mounted light switch will be a techological relic.

 

A Hue kit--sold for $199 at the Apple store-- come with four wireless LED bulbs, a wireless hub, and an app that you download for your smartphone or tablet and use to communicate with the bulbs, up to 50 at a time.

 

The LEDs can shine at any color on the spectrum, and, with a click, will absorb the exact color from a photograph on your phone. Or you can rely on Hue’s premixed color "recipes," which are tested to promote relaxation, concentration, energy, or reading.

 

Philips isn’t the only player in the game, of course. About the same time that Hue was announced, the Kickstarter drive for LIFX, another Wi-Fi-enabled LED, knocked it out of the park by raising $1.3 million, more than 10 times its goal. LIFX ups the ante by promising to "visualise your music with animated colors" and integrating with Facebook and Twitter for notifications.

 

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Parrot Flower Power - smart sensor for your plants (CES 2013 preview)

via ces.cnet


LAS VEGAS--This is what Bluetooth was invented for: a tong you stick in the soil of your plant that tells you when to water it.


The Flower Power is a gadget that Parrot will bring to market at some stage this year -- there is no word on price yet while the company works out how much it can get away with charging. The fork has sensors that send the information they pick up from the soil of your plant via Bluetooth to an iPad app.


Once you have told the app what the plant is, it cross-references the information received with the info in its database to tell you which day it needs watering, whether it's getting enough sun, and if it's hot or cold.

You can move the tongs to different plants, and see information on them all on your tablet screen. It also works on lawns.

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Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal

Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal | Web of Things | Scoop.it
And IoT will extend, expand and augment just about every conceivable installation of home, building, commercial, industrial and infrastructure automation. Smart meters may have been one of the first applications of IoT in energy, but it will soon be overshadowed by the impact(s) of devices as lowly as thermostats and light bulbs being elevated with intelligence and connected. Which brings me to this connection thing that seems to have so many people distracted. IoT solutions do NOT mean exclusively wireless.

To be sure, wireless connections will be a critical part of connecting the next generations of unattended devices, but, so too will wireline be an important part of the rich fabric of the IoT. What will they be connected to? Most importantly … YOU. As a private citizen, professional or public servant, your work, your play, your life, will be augmented by having some number of unattended devices monitoring – and perhaps controlling – one or more of the things, places, processes in your lives.

Boston Business Journal
Christopher Rezendes, President, INEX Advisors
18 Dec 2012
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Doormat is not just a doormat

Doormat is not just a doormat | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Don Willems designed a doormat. The doormat is not just for wiping your feet, but also for lowering the electricity consumption. How does it do it? The doormat is at the same time a LED display that allows people to easily turn off devices when leaving the house as well as improving their energy consumption behavior by leaning from tailored coaching when coming in.

From his report, “The Doormate is for wiping your feet and supporting lowering of electricity consumption. It does the latter by communicating information through an integrated LED display. It allows people to easily turn of devices when leaving the house as well as improving their energy consumption behavior by learning from tailored coaching when coming in. One could say the Doormate is addressing both the ‘consumer’ – making sure no money is wasted when not at home and the ‘citizen’ – contributing by environmental friendly behaviour – in people.
ddrrnt's insight:

Read the full report for more information [PDF, 3M]

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The Internet Of Things Is People, Innovating

The Internet Of Things Is People, Innovating | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A group of smart lamps could be intelligent enough to chatter to one another over Wi-Fi, allowing you to create amazing lighting "scenes" for your home, just like a lighting engineer in a theater. Such swarms of smart lights could automatically fade on and off to save energy as your home's occupants amble from room to room. Lamps like this could even alert you if you've got a new email, triggered by signals coming form your PC or tablet, or help you find your mislaid smartphone by detecting its Wi-Fi signature and then steering you to the room where you've left it. (...)


Imagine a lawn that knows when it needs a sprinkle by detecting the dryness of the grass or a flowerbed that knows it needs water by detecting the soil dryness. Then remember that the system is smart, and won't waste water--it may even conserve this precious resource by delivering irrigation precisely, and with not a drop of over-watering. A really smart system would even be able to add plant food to the mix at the right intervals, keeping your prize-winning rosebush in perfect health. There's even research going on as to how Internet Of Things-based irrigation could help farming. 

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Smartphone-triggered pet feeder connects to social media

Smartphone-triggered pet feeder connects to social media | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Hook your pets up with a high-tech feeding solution. The Pintofeed watches portions, automatically serves up meals, and texts feeding alerts to the owner.


(...) Pintofeed can send notifications of feeding start times, portions, feeding end times, and errors via e-mail, text, Twitter, and Facebook. That's right, your pet's food bowl could also be your Facebook buddy.


Read this article by Amanda Kooser on CNET.


can you say, QUANTIFIED CAT??


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LIFX Is A Smartphone-Controlled Lightbulb | TechCrunch

LIFX Is A Smartphone-Controlled Lightbulb | TechCrunch | Web of Things | Scoop.it

LIFX, a Kickstarter-funded lightbulb you control from your iOS or Android device.


... you can change the brightness and color of the bulb right from your phone. You can also set it to go on and off at a certain time and come on when you get home.


the product isn’t shipping until March 2013.  ... The bulb itself costs $69.


Here’s what it does:

  • Control your lights from anywhere
  • Choose any brightness for a specific bulb, a room or your whole house
  • Create the colors to match any mood or decor
  • Get notifications such as Twitter, Facebook, Texts and more
  • Reduce your energy consumption and save money
  • Visualise your music with animated colors
  • Make an impression at your next dinner party
  • Get creative with colors and effects
  • Create a night light for your kids
  • Security mode when you’re on holidays
  • Create groups of lights
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When it comes to the connected home, it's keep it simple, stupid

When it comes to the connected home, it's keep it simple, stupid | Web of Things | Scoop.it

As more people install smart NEST thermostats and use iPads to interact with their TVs, the stage is set for massive adoption of the completely connected home, right? Well, maybe.


Some big issues have to be sorted out before that will happen. For one thing, there is a Tower of Babel of standards for communicating between various devices made by different vendors to serve different purposes. That has to come together first, according to speakers at GigaOM’s Mobilize conference on Friday.


There are cool home automation devices coming out of Kickstarter as well as from consumer electronic giants. That variety is great except for the fact that if these things can’t talk to each other, they really aren’t connected at all.

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When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data

When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

They're in vending machines, parking meters, home security systems, and even healthcare devices for the elderly. They are wireless sensors, a key component of the burgeoning machine-to-machine (M2M) industry where devices use wired and wireless connections to communicate with each other. Though far from new, M2M technology is expanding its reach at a dramatic rate.

 

M2M connections will grow to 2.1 billion by 2021, up from roughly 100 million last year, according to research firm Analysis Mason. The dramatic growth of global smartphone usage is a major factor in M2M's popularity, of course, as are industrial applications in the transportation, emergency services, security, and retail sectors.

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How the Internet of Things could change Australian homes and businesses

Many of the barriers to adopting the Internet of Things in the home revolve around design issues. For example, Williams says a substantial amount of intelligence is required to enable alerts to be sent when the user wants to receive them – not when the events actually occur. (...)

 

The Internet of Things not only has potential in the home, but businesses could also benefit from it to find out what is happening in real time. For example, it could be used to track the exact location of parcels or drivers. (...)

 

Google has already made a move into this area, with the release in June this year of Google Maps Coordinate which allows businesses to track exactly where employees are located through Google Maps. (...)

 

There are numerous issues around privacy and security. For example, allowing a fridge to connect to the internet could create potential holes for hackers to get into personal networks. How readily consumers will accept these potential invasions of privacy remain to be seen, Williams says, but a tightening of online security will help.

 

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Too many obstacles to 'smart homes' anytime soon: Pew Research

A lot of the elements of the much-anticipated “smart home” will be arriving on the scene by 2020, but the idea of a very smart, well-connected house may still be quite a ways off. That’s the takeaway from a new survey of 1,021 Internet experts, researchers, observers, and critics, released by the Pew Research Center. Respondents are fairly evenly split between those who agreed that energy- and money-saving "smart systems" will be significantly closer to reality in people's homes by 2020 and those who said such homes will still remain a “marketing mirage.”


Some 51% agreed with the statement that by 2020, “the connected household has become a model of efficiency, as people are able to manage consumption of resources (electricity, water, food, even bandwidth) in ways that place less of a burden on the environment while saving households money.”


via SmartPlanet.com (blog)


Via Richard Kastelein
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Watchers, carers, and administrators: the smart homes of tomorrow

Watchers, carers, and administrators: the smart homes of tomorrow | Web of Things | Scoop.it
How smart should a smart home be before it's worthy of the name? Diane Cook's research into smart homes goes well beyond presence-detecting light switches; she's interested in homes that observe their residents and make decisions on their behalf.

 

If ambient intelligence is next, it's logical that the home will be among the first places we experience it. But what will this mean? "The idea is that computer software playing the role of an intelligent agent perceives the state of the physical environment and residents using sensors, reasons about this state using artificial intelligence techniques, and then takes actions to achieve specified goals," writes Cook. Such goals include "maximizing comfort of the residents, minimizing the consumption of resources, and maintaining the health and safety of the home and resources."

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