Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Check out the crazy $99 connected electric toothbrush

Check out the crazy $99 connected electric toothbrush | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Kolibree is announcing what it calls the world’s first connected electric toothbrush today. It sounds pretty weird, but Kolibree says it can analyze your brushing habits and display them on a mobile dashboard that you can access from your phone. The idea is to motivate you, or shame you, into brushing better.

 

For $99, it better be good.

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Excellent Analysis on Wearable Tech for Healthcare market to hit $6B by 2016

Excellent Analysis on Wearable Tech for Healthcare market to hit $6B by 2016 | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The global market for wearable technology is expected to triple to $6 billion by 2016--and that's a conservative estimate, says market research firm IMS Research.

Via Richard Platt, Dionne
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:41 AM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): one of the better analysis' I've seen on wearables, and in this case focused on the healthcare market

Dionne's curator insight, December 3, 2013 9:34 PM

Success depends on wearable options being at least as efficient (or better) than what is currently on offer. 

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This happy tattoo is really a medical sensor-Futurity.org

This happy tattoo is really a medical sensor-Futurity.org | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A medical sensor that attaches to the skin like a temporary tattoo could make it easier for doctors to detect metabolic problems in patients and for coaches to fine-tune athletes’ training routines. And the entire sensor comes in a thin, flexible package shaped like a smiley face.


Via Wildcat2030
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Fitbit Ultra

Fitbit Ultra | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Fitbit has been a star in the wearable fitness tracker scene for quite some time. No wonder - it was one of the first devices that was small and pretty enough to be worn around the clock and it is able to track both activity and sleep.


Fitbit’s strength is that its functionalities are very simple due to the single-button control. Each press of the button cycles the display (OLED) through one of six modes (steps, distance, floors climbed, calories burned, flower (overall recent activity level and clock). Yet the device collects an immense amount of data that can nicely be viewed in several Fitbit apps or the Fitbit web application. Additionally, even more details can be logged, such as individual foods and workouts from your smart phone or computer. And weight and other health indicators such as blood pressure, glucose, and heart rate can be included as well.


via wearable-technologies.com

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Big Data in Your Blood

Big Data in Your Blood | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Sensors of your heart, blood, and brain are coming to market. These may be a boon to science and personal health. For the companies involved, they may be goldmines of intimate real-time data on millions of subjects.


Later this year, a Boston-based company called MC10 will offer the first of several “stretchable electronics” products that can be put on things like shirts and shoes, worn as temporary tattoos or installed in the body. These will be capable of measuring not just heart rate, the company says, but brain activity, body temperature and hydration levels. Another company, called Proteus, will begin a pilot program in Britain for a “Digital Health Feedback System” that combines both wearable technologies and microchips the size of a sand grain that ride a pill right through you. Powered by your stomach fluids, it emits a signal picked up by an external sensor, capturing vital data. Another firm, Sano Intelligence, is looking at micro needle sensors on skin patches as a way of deriving continuous information about the bloodstream.

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The Internet of things: Smart houses, smart traffic, smart health

In the same way as we put ID chips on products, we can attach sensors to ourselves and allow them to communicate via the Web to other objects around us. The health service is currently testing sensors on elderly patients living at home. The sensors can monitor pulse and blood pressure.


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Major changes in the energy sector in recent years mean that the need for smart, flexible energy is increasing, and that energy production and storage facilities will have to become more coordinated. Current methods mean that our electricity is supplied by large, commercial energy companies from coal, gas and nuclear power stations.


So far, these centrally controlled systems have not needed to communicate much with the outside world. In the future, however, distributed energy sources provided by multiple suppliers will take over. These sources will come from renewable energy such as hydro, wind and solar.

 

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Norwegians are in favour of the service, since we think that the environment and saving energy are important. Americans, on the other hand, are sceptical: 'Are the energy companies going to see inside my fridge?!' With a box on the wall, information will flow both ways, but exactly what data will go out?

 

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Electric cars will be able to connect to the smart future grid. Each car will contain a unique identifying SIM/MIM card, like the card in your mobile.


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When vehicles and road infrastructure come online and communicate with each other, the range of opportunities will be enormous. When your car is connected to the Internet of Traffic, you will be able to receive information about everything that is happening around you. How many other cars are on the road? Which is the quickest route, taking traffic into account, and how fast should you drive if you want the next traffic light to be on green?

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Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data

Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Put all this data in the cloud, (privacy not included) and personal medicine becomes a reality, tracking our mood, skin temperatures and the analysis of correlated data becomes a new picture we have of ourselves, and a new image we can project unto the world.

 

“They’re really external extensions of our mind,” said Joseph Tranquillo, associate professor of biomedical and electrical engineering at Bucknell University. (referring to all our networked devices- CNN)

 

So, vast amounts of data, self-tracking, personal information stock exchange, our own memories in the cloud, implants under our skins transmitting the data continuously.

 

by @Wildcat2030

 


Via Peter Vander Auwera
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Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:58 AM
Thanks Peter, glad you liked the article
Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:59 AM
Thanks for sharing this, glad you liked the article
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HP CeNSE: Sensor Networks and the Pulse of the Planet

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IBM Next 5 in 5: 2011

IBM unveils its sixth annual "Next 5 in 5" -- a list of innovations with the potential to change the way people work, live and play over the next five years....
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Larry Smarr: An Evolution Toward a Programmable World

Larry Smarr: An Evolution Toward a Programmable World | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"The same principle applies to our bodies. I wear sensors to measure my steps, caloric burn and sleep patterns, while heart patients can wear sensors that wirelessly notify their doctors of life-threatening conditions. People will soon be able to have their genetic code and medical imaging stored in the cloud, along with charts of vital signs and detailed nutritional analysis of everything they consume.

 

Using this data, the planetary computer will be able to build a computational model of your body and compare your sensor stream with millions of others. Besides providing early detection of internal changes that could lead to disease, cloud-powered voice-recognition wellness coaches could provide continual personalized support on lifestyle choices, potentially staving off disease and making health care affordable for everyone."

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Wearable sensor measures anxiety, helps autism research

Wearable sensor measures anxiety, helps autism research | Web of Things | Scoop.it

'When autistic children get stressed they often don’t show it. Instead, their tension might build until they have a crisis, which can result in aggression toward others and even self-injury. Since autistic children have a difficult time expressing or even understanding their emotions, teachers and caregivers can have a difficult time anticipating and preventing crises.

 

Affectiva has developed a wearable, wireless sensor capable of detecting subtle changes in users emotion, including stress and excitement levels, by measuring electro-dermal activity (EDA).'


Via Andrew Spong
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The Internet of Things – this is where we're going

The Internet of Things – this is where we're going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet: What are we connecting?
"The Internet of Things is not just about devices that are directly connected to the internet. Sensors and identifiers such as RFID (radio frequency identification) tags also provide data through an intermediary such as a mobile phone, RFID reader, or internet-connected base station.

 

This means an RFID-tagged cereal box may be considered as one of the “things” on the internet. Theoretically, the RFID would have been used in conjunction with other sensors to record the full life-history of that particular box of cereal, from the time it was manufactured to how it was transported and how long it took for it to be empty."

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These Are The Killer Apps That Will Make 'The Internet Of Things' Indispensable In Everyday Life

These Are The Killer Apps That Will Make 'The Internet Of Things' Indispensable In Everyday Life | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Here are some of the devices and applications that will be implemented at the consumer and civic level that we think will make the Internet of Things, or IOT, a critically important part of our daily lives:

Kitchen and home appliances  such as refrigerators, washers and dryers, and coffee makers that can keep track of when the milk is out and let you know when the clothes are dry.

 

Lighting and heating products , including bulbs, thermostats, and air conditioners that maximize energy efficiency.

 

Safety and security monitoring devices such as baby and assisted living monitoring systems, smoke detectors, fire hydrants, cameras, sensor-equipped drawers and safes, and home alarm systems. 

 

Health and fitness products that measure exercise, steps, sleep, weight, blood pressure, and other statistics.

 

Intelligent traffic management systems , including toll-taking operations, congestion penalties, and smart parking-space management.

 

Waste management systems , such as garbage cans and recycle bins with RFID tags that allow sanitation staff to see when garbage has been put out."Pay as you throw programs" are also likely to decrease garbage waste and increase recycling efforts.

 

Industrial uses , including Internet-managed assembly lines, connected factories, and warehouses, etc.

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Would You Be Comfortable Trusting Your Health To a Robot Doctor?

Would You Be Comfortable Trusting Your Health To a Robot Doctor? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Technology is marching ever forward and the medicine is no exception. CNN's Fortune Tech predicts tech will eventually take over 80 percent of what doctors do today andthat might begreat, but would you feel comfortable putting your life in the handsof Dr. Robot?  Chances are that someday, you won't have a choice. 


by Gizmodo UK

09 Dec 2012

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Will New Smart-Device Replace Your Doctor?

Will New Smart-Device Replace Your Doctor? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Portable medical devices may soon be small and inexpensive enough to measure your vital signs daily, replacing what would be trips to the doctor with digital diagnoses. One company, Scanadu, has announced plans to start selling its first device—the Scout, which monitors heart rate, temperature, blood oxygenation, and other vital signs—by the end of 2013, "as well as a disposable urine-analysis test that can swiftly detect pregnancy issues, urinary tract infections, and kidney problems, and a saliva analysis test that can detect upper respiratory problems like strep throat and the flu."


IdeaFeed | Big Think

Orion Jones

01 Dec 2012

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DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body

DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The biodegradable electronics are made using silicon and magnesium encased inside a silk layer. The qualities of the silk determine how long the system lasts before degrading, and since silicon and magnesium are both found in our bodies (in tiny quantities), DARPA assures that the technology shouldn't be harmful, whether it dissolves inside or outside the human body.


In medicine, dissolving electronics could be inserted into a wound before closing it up, and could monitor healing or apply heat to the damaged area to speed the process. Then, after a few weeks, the system would simply break apart, which would mean no second surgery to remove it and no more healing needed.


... dissolving electronics could mean a lot less e-waste, since your old phones, computers, toasters and what-have-you would biodegrade instead of sitting in a landfill. That, and instead of wearable electronics, why don't we just skip on over to embeddable bio-circuitry? Google Glass is fine to start, but I'm waiting for the disposable contact lens version.

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Edward Wang's curator insight, June 19, 2013 9:28 AM

Reminds me of Stefanie's idea of compostable 3d printing.

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Mirror, Mirror, What's the Weather?

The industry of Web-connected devices, or what some analysts call the machine-to-machine market, is expected to vault in size in the coming years: CapGemini estimates that the world M2M market will be worth €27.4 billion (US$35 billion) by 2013.

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The Cybertecture Mirror cost about HK$15 million (US$1.9 million) to develop, says Mr. Law, whose company began work on the product about three years ago. "With all the development costs we, don't see ourselves breaking even unless we make dramatically huge sales," says Mr. Law, who says the company took the project on as a "semi-innovation venture" and isn't likely to break even for two to three years.


He sees a future in other related products, such as backpacks that help parents track whether children arrive safely at school, or chairs that monitor your health.


The challenge for many of these products is how to bring them to consumers at an affordable price: The Cybertecture Mirror, for example, retails for US$5,000. The company is hoping to bring the price tag closer to US$1,000.


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Which sensors are coming to your next smartphone? | mobihealthnews

Which sensors are coming to your next smartphone? | mobihealthnews | Web of Things | Scoop.it

According to an interview with the general manager of the MEMS division of STMicroelectronics, Benedetto Vigna, smartphones will soon offer up a whole slew of new embedded sensors that could help to make mobile health services more accessible.

 

The introduction of extra sensors into consumer phones and other devices will really be just the first step into finding sensors everywhere according to Vigna. He states that in the next few years we will be seeing sensors in our socks, shoes, glasses and household fixtures like the garbage can — all aimed at measuring a person’s environmental health factors.

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Qualcomm Atheros joins Internet of Things with tiny comms chip

Qualcomm Atheros joins Internet of Things with tiny comms chip | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Qualcomm Atheros has jumped onto the Internet of Things bandwagon with a new chipset, the AR4100P, intended to give your washing machine, lighting and just about anything else a direct line to the web.

 

Qualcomm Atheros calls its line-up of products for the segment its “Internet of Everything portfolio” and expects it to find buyers among smart energy providers, those creating products for the “intelligent home”, in security and building automation, for remote health and wellness monitoring, and more.

 

via SlashGear

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Today's Wearable Computers Help You Sleep, Not Tweet

Today's Wearable Computers Help You Sleep, Not Tweet | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"“I think we are at the very beginning of wearable computing,” said Julia Hu, founder and chief executive of Lark, a start-up based in Mountain View, Calif., that makes a wearable sleep tracking monitor. “You’re starting to see a lot of sensors that track data and then visualize it.”"

 

via bits.blogs.nytimes.com

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10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you

10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"These days, Big Brother doesn't need to do much snooping. We just tell him what we're up to. We tweet, check in on Foursquare, use digital payment systems and generally live so publicly that spying loses at least some degree of utility.


Meanwhile, we're quickly expanding the systems we've built to monitor ourselves and our environments. We connect our power consumption to the internet via "smart meters," we let Google's cameras map our streets and we use wireless gadgets to transmit vital signs to doctors."

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This Box Sends Your Health Data Straight to the Cloud

This Box Sends Your Health Data Straight to the Cloud | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Some 133 million Americans suffer from chronic disease, and many would benefit from better home-based monitoring of their condition, but today's home-health medical machines remain mostly unconnected to the doctors who might want to check the data between visits.

 

A new platform from Qualcomm aims to solve this with a simple box that detect signals from devices of dozens of makers, and dispatches them by cellular connection to a cloud database that can be accessed by medical staff as well as patients."

 

via Technology Review

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Wearable Smart Meter Turns Fitness Into An Interactive Game @PSFK

Wearable Smart Meter Turns Fitness Into An Interactive Game @PSFK | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"One company operating in this space is Switch2Health (S2H)- a company producing simple, wearable technology that keeps track of an individual’s fitness achievements and provides incentives through a scalable platform that rewards healthy behavior. As users complete a specified amount of high-level exercise, the device presents a simple code to reward positive behavior that can be redeemed at the S2H website for various promotions and prizes. Users can also access personal health statistics on the site to track their progress over time. PSFK spoke with CEO and President Seth Tropper of S2H."

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How the 'internet of things' could radically change local government

"The IoT is linked to a number of other emerging ideas, such as smart cities, pervasive sensing and machine-to-machine communication – all of which are being tentatively explored by businesses and government. Regardless of what name it is given, this merger of the physical and virtual worlds could allow local authorities to deliver much more efficient services, reducing waste and unlocking reams of useful data: think water mains loaded with clusters of sensors that can alert engineers to leaks or blockages, or lampposts that can detect light levels and save energy by turning themselves off. Sensors could even be used to check the effectiveness of waste removal and recycling services, or help the police locate stolen goods."

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