Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Excellent Analysis on Wearable Tech for Healthcare market to hit $6B by 2016

Excellent Analysis on Wearable Tech for Healthcare market to hit $6B by 2016 | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The global market for wearable technology is expected to triple to $6 billion by 2016--and that's a conservative estimate, says market research firm IMS Research.

Via Richard Platt, Dionne
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:41 AM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): one of the better analysis' I've seen on wearables, and in this case focused on the healthcare market

Dionne's curator insight, December 3, 2013 9:34 PM

Success depends on wearable options being at least as efficient (or better) than what is currently on offer. 

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Is Cisco’s Forecast of 50 Billion Internet-Connected Things by 2020 Too Conservative?

Is Cisco’s Forecast of 50 Billion Internet-Connected Things by 2020 Too Conservative? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

According to Cisco, there are an estimated 1.5 trillion things in the world (no mention of exactly how they counted those things, but let’s go with it) and approximately 8.7 billion, or 0.6%, were connected in 2012. The firm expects a 25% annualized decrease in price to connect between 2012 and 2020 and a matching 25% annualized increase in connectivity. That means we can expect 50 billion connected things by 2020, with 50% of those connections happening in the final three years of the decade.

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The Internet of Things: Buzzword or Big Business?

The Internet of Things: Buzzword or Big Business? | Web of Things | Scoop.it
With trillions of end-point 'things', device cloud platforms, subnets for humans, machines, sensor networks and rampant innovation being fostered globally, the Internet of Things could have the same disruptive potential as the Internet itself.

 

Building on the foundation of the IoT, the Cisco (CSCO) vision is the Internet of Everything, which it defines as bringing together people, process, data, and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before. Cisco believes that there is a $14.4 trillion value at stake in this market, which combines the increased revenues and lower costs that is created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022. The factors driving the trend include mainstreaming of sensors, cloud computing and the migration of everything to IP networks.

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2013 will be the year of ‘the Internet of things’ as more than 5B wireless chips ship

2013 will be the year of ‘the Internet of things’ as more than 5B wireless chips ship | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Over five billion wireless connectivity chips will ship in 2013, according to ABI Research, as our appetite for everything mobile continues to grow. Bluetooth and Wi-Fi are both growing, of course, but so are lesser-known specs such as Zigbee, UWB, and, yes, even NFC. (...)


I talked to Peter Cooney, a wireless analyst with ABI, just before the the research company’s London offices closed for the Christmas long weekend.


“NFC has gone from two million devices in 2010 to 100 million in 2012,” he said. “Android is really driving that growth, but NFC is coming of age … and integration into smartphones is driving growth in other areas.”


That’s something we’ve seen a lot of this year: sensors and connected switches for windows and doors, lights, heating, and more. SmartThings wants to help youcontrol the real world, as does ReelyActive. And while NFC has been the next great thing for some time, we’re seeing a ton of innovation in the home automation space using multiple wireless protocols.


“In 2013 cumulative shipments of Bluetooth-enabled devices will surpass 10 billion and Wi-Fi enabled devices will surpass 10 billion cumulative shipments in 2015,” Cooney said in a statement.






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"Internet of things" to give $10-15 trillion boost to global economy

"Internet of things" to give $10-15 trillion boost to global economy | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Productivity gains resulting from the “internet of things” could add between $10 trillion and $15 trillion to global GDP over the next 20 years, according to a new study from General Electric (GE).


The manufacturing giant reckons the “industrial internet”, as it terms the phenomenon, could find direct application in sectors accounting for more than $32.3 trillion in global economic activity, but expects this figure to reach about $82 trillion – one half of global economic output – by 2025. (...)


... it acknowledges that if its vision is to become reality there needs to be a sustained effort in technological innovation, with considerable investments in the deployment of the necessary sensors, instrumentation and user-interface systems.


GE also calls for a robust cyber security system and greater protection of sensitive information and intellectual property, as well as the development of talent and creation of so-called “cross-cutting roles” that combine mechanical and industrial engineering.


GE | TelecomEngine.com

Iain Morris
27 Nov 2012


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Neul Raises $5M To Connect The Internet Of Things Using TV White Space

Neul Raises $5M To Connect The Internet Of Things Using TV White Space | Web of Things | Scoop.it

UK-based Neul today announced a new $5 million investment from Mistui & Co. Ltd. subsidiary MGI, as well as existing investors DFJ Esprit, IQ Capital, Business Angels and founding company employees. Neul offers businesses and others a way to create a machine-to-machine (M2M) network using TV signal white space frequencies, which has the advantage of taking bandwidth-heavy, essential communication between devices away from congested frequencies like those used for Wi-Fi and GSM networks. The money will be used to help the firm expand its business, but Neul is more interested in the potential partnerships that investment from Mitsui brings along with it. (...)


Ultimately, what Neul is looking at is the opportunity arising in connected devices, even though other uses include rural broadband (which Neul is actually trialling as well). That focus is designed to capitalize on what Smyth says is a market with a huge amount of growth potential.


“There are all sorts of potential forecasts for M2M growth over the next 10 years or so, and the only thing they have in common is that they all see huge growth,” he said. “One, for example, suggests it’ll be a $150 billion market in the next five years. Another suggests it’ll be that size by 2020. The common theme is that it’ll be huge, probably around one-third the size of the current global mobile market.”


Neul is betting on its Weightless communication standard to define the entire category.

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Mobile Europe - Only two M2M sectors ready for breakthrough

Mobile Europe - Only two M2M sectors ready for breakthrough | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Speaking at a seminar held by European Communucations, titled "Beyond Connectivity", Schlautmann said that the Fleet and Freight Management and Security and Surveillance sectors are the only two sectors achieving market "breakthrough". (...)


Schlautmann added that he "can't see" payments, vending and NFC becoming "mass market" in Europe, and added that metering and monitoring, often touted as a key vertical, offers little beyond basic connectivity revenues. Schlautmann also pointed out that "no other market" is so dependent on regulatory and legislative drivers - referencing eCall and smart metering as example. "If smart metering was not regulated then there would be no market at all," he said.

But it was for the e- and m-health market that he expressed his strongest reservations.(...)


"It's not about the number of devices." he said, "it's about revenue." To build revenues, telcos will need to develop ecosystems that let them orchestrate and develop services, so that they can benefit from the created value. At the moment, most markets exhibit far too many players, operating in too small spheres of influence. Telcos, by partnering, co-operating and forming alliances with partners throught the value chaing, could drive the sort of ecosystem consolidation that is required, he said, to drive "breakthrough" revenues.

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Jon Blackmore's curator insight, May 21, 4:56 AM

These two industries are advanced because it makes sense, driving efficiency and squeezing the already ruthlessly tight margins in global transportation and with Security it is a governed requirement this is naturally the way to improve security, the infrastructure and imbedded capability to are already advanced enough to adopt M2M..

Needless to say the quicker any given industry and specific organisation adopts a Machine to machine strategy and roadmap the better!

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If the Internet of Things Will Be So Big, Why Is It Still a Mystery?

If the Internet of Things Will Be So Big, Why Is It Still a Mystery? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new market research study available from a British firm, Companies and Markets, predicts that by 2017 the global Internet of Things market will reach sales of $290 billion.


First, wow.


Second, I'm forced to ask again: If the "IoT" has such short-term promise (not to mention its long-term transformational impact on every aspect of our society and economy), why does the very term, let alone the examples that are already making it a reality, remain such a mystery in the U.S? I have yet to find an intelligent layman who's already familiar with the IoT before I explain it.

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ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge

ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things represents a big opportunity to drive growth for both UK and worldwide economies. According to IMS Research, governments will play a key role in defining the regulations that will propel shipments for M2M communications modules to more than 118 million units by 2016, especially in the automotive sector.

 ...

The first forum will meet on August 24 in the UK and will be chaired by Gary Atkinson, who leads the Internet of Things initiative at ARM.

 

“In the next five years, over £2.4 billion will be spent in the UK on smart home energy management devices, ranging from smart meters themselves to in-home devices that are connected to them. This is a great example of an Internet of Things application, but is only a fraction of the market that will open up over the next 15-20 years,” said Atkinson.

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The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Web of Things | Scoop.it

China, Japan and the European Union all invest about €1 billion a year in the Internet of Things; it is not known how much the US spends but the country also tags, scans and monitors goods and services. "The question of whether this is a desirable development or not is no longer relevant, the technology is there and we're using it," says IT specialist Arjan Geurts of Twynstra Gudde Advice Bureau.

 

The technical problems have been solved; an RFID or Radio Frequency Identification tag costs just five cents and wireless internet is in the ascendancy. The amount of information being sent is relatively small, which means there is very little chance of overloading the internet connection. Geurts: "the advent of the smartphone is the motor driving technological developments."

 

...

 

Asia is in the vanguard when it comes to the Internet of Things. Van 't Hof: "Chinese and Japanese users have integrated the technology very harmoniously. When China introduced electronic licence plates in order to monitor and regulate traffic, the authorities feared it would lead to riots as the technology could be used to restrict freedom of movement. However, there were no protests once the advantages of the system were explained and assurances about data accumulation were given. Transparency was the key."

 

...

 

The privacy issues don't worry companies very much, but security is very much an issue. Jaap-Henk Hoepman, a computer security and privacy expert attached to Radboud University in Nijmegen, says, "If something goes wrong, the damage is enormous. A company could be stuck with an entire shipment of perishable goods if the tracking system goes down or could be hit by digital industrial espionage."

 

"But that's no reason not to go ahead. We have to be aware of the risks. About 90 percent of the applications for this technology haven't even been thought of yet. And there will certainly be ways to use the technology that will make us wonder how we ever survived without them."

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mHealth: The Next Frontier For Mobile Service Growth - Forbes

Wearable body sensors and remote monitoring can keep chronic patients out of hospitals and improve their quality of life while significantly reducing admission expenses.

 

Analyst forecasts estimate the potential value of the mHealth market will be $4.6 billion by 2014. The driving forces behind this expected uptick are numerous. Mounting pressure to cut burgeoning costs in the U.S. healthcare system is a government mandated objective; in particular, preventable readmissions cost an estimated $12–17 billion per year. On top of this lies the problem of an aging population, exacerbated by the size of the baby boomer demographic. Americans aged 60 or older represented 18 percent of the U.S. population in 2009; , this segment is expected to grow to 27 percent by 2050.

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By 2016: 100M wearable wireless sensors

By 2016: 100M wearable wireless sensors | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The market for wearable devices will exceed 100 million units annually by 2016, reports ABI Research in a new study. A study released by ABI last June estimated that 80 million of those units would be fitness sensors. 


Via Bart Collet
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The Internet of Things: The Opportunity of a Lifetime?

The Internet of Things: The Opportunity of a Lifetime? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"The "Internet of Things" is a term that describes the many objects in the physical world that are now connected to the web. It also describes an industry that is expected to earn mobile device operators nearly $1.2 trillion in revenue by 2020.

 

When discussing The "Internet of Things" we refer to connected devices that are part of systems tuned into larger systems, or information bases, that the Internet offers. The devices "talk" with each other, exchanging services and data. Such connected devises range from smartphones and tablets, to TVs and DVD players, security systems, GPS and tracking systems, and much more."

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Here's what one venture capitalist seeks from the Internet of things

Here's what one venture capitalist seeks from the Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Barry Eggers, an investor at Lightspeed Venture Partners, is trying to piece together growth opportunities in the emerging Internet of things, and while he can't be sure, he's got some ideas.

 

Data scientists, entrepreneurs, and IT analysts have great hopes for the Internet of things. One analyst recently declared 2014 to be the year when IT buyers focus more on the Internet of things.

 

In line with the much parroted software-is-eating-the-world logic, Eggers is betting that the control point will turn out to be in a person’s phone rather than on a separate, wholly new device for the home.

“The penetration of smartphones is pretty high,” he said. “… Why isn’t the control point just your mobile phone? It has all the radios in it that you need. It has all of the software you need.” It’s reasonable to think of them as a solid landing pad for all the data and analytics from the Internet of things devices a person owns or uses.

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Record growth in Bluetooth Smart devices announced - M2M Now

Record growth in Bluetooth Smart devices announced - M2M Now | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A string of moves to add increasing levels of Bluetooth Smart Ready and Bluetooth Smart technology integration by leading OS providers like Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry, and most recently, Google, sets the stage for an extraordinary increase in Bluetooth Smart devices.  According to Bluetooth SIG, there was a year on year growth of more than 186% in the first half of 2013 alone.


Via Tictrac
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Marcus Taylor's curator insight, December 16, 2013 7:43 PM

IOB - Internet of Bluetooth. It is a smart bet that it is a key driver.

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How Many Things Are Currently Connected To The "Internet of Things" (IoT)? - Forbes

How Many Things Are Currently Connected To The "Internet of Things" (IoT)? - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

This is a topic that is important to us at Cisco. We believe the number of internet connected devices reached 8.7 billion in 2012. There are a number of estimates out there by others, but they are generally in the eight to ten billion range. This number would include traditional computer devices, mobile devices, as well as the new industrial and consumer devices that we think of as things.


You can get background and references on that number in a white paper by Cisco’s IBSG group:http://www.cisco.com/web/about/a… Dave Evans on our team works with market researchers to sort these numbers out. IMS Research is traditionally a good source for this sort of data. (...)


This question originally appeared on Quora. More questions on Embedded Systems:


Rob Soderbery, Cisco Executive

07 Jan 2013

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Sigfox's IoT Network already covers 80% of France •

Sigfox's IoT Network already covers 80% of France • | Web of Things | Scoop.it

With LeWeb just a week away, the Internet of Things, this year’s theme for LeWeb Paris, is on everyone’s minds. After all, with LeWeb’s tendency to pick sectors/trends on the rise, it’s no surprise that everyone’s talking about it. While we’ve not quite arrived at Microsoft’s vision of the future, Sigfox as made significant strides in laying down the groundwork for connected devices, with a network covering 80% of France, and 100% coverage set for early 2013.


The Rude Baguette

by LiamBoogar

26 Nov 2012 

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Study: wearable computing will be a $1.5B business by 2014

Study: wearable computing will be a $1.5B business by 2014 | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Google’s Project Glass may sound like a bet on a distant future, but wearable computing could become a billion-dollar business sooner that you might expect: Juniper believes that smart watches, wearable fitness gizmos and head-mounted displays will bring in $1.5 billion by 2014.

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China: Why Internet of Things awareness should be on your corporate due diligence agenda

China: Why Internet of Things awareness should be on your corporate due diligence agenda | Web of Things | Scoop.it

One factor alone - China - should be making western political and business leaders wake up, sit up, take notice and put the “Internet of Things” firmly into all their political and corporate business planning cycles.


The outgoing Chinese Politburo certainly recognised the transformative impact of billions of cheap, small, very smart, intercommunicating sensor devices - the miniature building blocks of the Internet of Things.


This is about the capability of every object to have a unique identifier (URL) using chip, sensor and communications technology to intercommunicate with its environment, other objects and living things (including humans) - and also to make autonomous decisions. This'll be hugely disruptive to us all.


The technology embracing Chinese government is now three years into building its Internet of Things programme which last year it reckoned to grow annually at 30% to become a £48bn market within China by 2013..


Dr John Riley is passionate about improving the innovation process, having first hand experience of large enterprises, small business, academia, and government.  More...

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IoT ripe for adoption in India: Study

In fact, companies across multiple industries are already using Internet of Things technologies to track and manage physical assets, improve the customer experience, enhance supply chain visibility and more.


The global October 2012 commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting “Building Value from Visibility: 2012 Enterprise Internet of Things Adoption Outlook” showed the following results:


There is a positive perception of the term IoT in India, and 92% of respondents agree with a common definition provided of what IoT solutions are.


India Leads the World in Implementing IoT Solutions


30% of organizations in India already have an IoT solution in place as compared to 15% of organizations globally.


7 in 10 organizations in India are planning to implement IoT Solutions within the next two years as compared to 5 in 10 organizations globally. ...


While supply chain visibility and asset tracking are the top issues organizations hope to address with these solutions, the top benefits for surveyed enterprises in India include: improved customer service, supply chain visibility and cost efficiencies.

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Waiting for the Internet of Things – DC Velocity

More than a decade ago, radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology pioneer Kevin Ashton coined the term "Internet of Things." The idea was that every item, product, or "thing" would have a unique identifier just as every computer does on the Internet. RF tags, of course, would provide the means by which these things could be tracked and identified.

 

For logistics managers, the Internet of Things would be a game changer. Among other benefits, it would make it possible to track the flow of goods into and out of a warehouse at the item level. Some retailers and consumer packaged goods manufacturers are already experimenting with item-level tracking. Nonetheless, it appears that the ability to track everything is still several years away.

 

Why? A recent report from Frost & Sullivan ("Analysis of the Active RFID and Sensor Networks Market") offers some insight into the barriers to making the Internet of Things a reality. One of the top challenges, it notes, is getting more companies to buy the type of tags necessary to make this possible. (...)

 

As for why users are shying away from active tags, there are a couple of reasons. First, there's the lack of common industry standards. While passive tags use data standards developed by the EPCglobal consortium, there's no such system in place for active tags. At the moment, makers of active tags use different technology protocols, such as Wi-Fi, Rubee, Zigbee, ultra wide band, infrared, and ultrasound. All of those protocols require different standards, hindering widescale adoption of the technology. (...)

 

Although a standard would hasten the adoption of active tags, there's still another obstacle—cost. Bhattacharya says a passive basic tag goes for $2 to $5 per unit,while an active tag costs between $10 and $15. And that's the low end of the range. If those tags are embedded with sensors and support multiple technologies, the cost of an active tag can top $100 per unit.

 

 

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Canada's Rogers sees growth in Internet of things

Canada's Rogers sees growth in Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Rogers Communications Inc , Canada's largest wireless company, says the "Internet of things" - fridges that write shopping lists and smoke alarms that send text messages - will be a C$400 million ($384 million) market in Canada by 2015 and that it wants a significant share.

 

"$400 million is just the start. It's just the beginning of what we think is an absolute explosion of opportunity in the M2M space," Robert Bruce, president of the company's wireless and cable units, said on the sidelines of a telecom conference on Monday.

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Your House: The Next Great Digital Network

Your House: The Next Great Digital Network | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Connected boxes Twine and Ninja Blocks, card-like Electric Imp, and stand-alone sensor hub Knut all use sensors to communicate information about objects or the environment around them to the Internet — a concept known as “The Internet of Things.”

 

The Internet of Things has been around for a while. It includes gadgets like connected scales and the Nike+ shoe, as well as identifying technologies as simple as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags. Over the last few years, however, the hardware involved in putting objects online has become more accessible — and The Internet of Things has made a beeline toward the mainstream.

 

“Trying to determine the market size of the Internet of Things is like trying to calculate the market for plastics, circa 1940,” Nelson explained in a report by consulting firm the Hammersmith Group. “At that time, it was difficult to imagine that plastics could be in everything.

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Space invaders | The Economist

Space invaders | The Economist | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"America’s Intel and Britain’s ARM have long dominated different bits of the global chip market. Now each is attacking the other’s stronghold"

 

"The battle is not just about dividing up territories already occupied; it is also about finding new lands to conquer. Both firms are keen to stake claims on the largely uncolonised and still somewhat notional terrain known as the “internet of things”: the myriad processors in industrial machinery, consumer goods and infrastructure, ever more of which will communicate with each other and with distant computers. Cisco, a giant American maker of networking gear, estimates that by 2015 there may be almost 15 billion internet-connected devices, up from 7.5 billion in 2010. Whereas the market for more phones and other personal computing devices is limited by the number of persons the planet has to offer, things, being more numerous than people, provide a lot more long-term room for growth."

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The Internet of Things – this is where we're going

The Internet of Things – this is where we're going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet: What are we connecting?
"The Internet of Things is not just about devices that are directly connected to the internet. Sensors and identifiers such as RFID (radio frequency identification) tags also provide data through an intermediary such as a mobile phone, RFID reader, or internet-connected base station.

 

This means an RFID-tagged cereal box may be considered as one of the “things” on the internet. Theoretically, the RFID would have been used in conjunction with other sensors to record the full life-history of that particular box of cereal, from the time it was manufactured to how it was transported and how long it took for it to be empty."

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