Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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What is the Internet of Things and Why is it Important?

What is the Internet of Things and Why is it Important? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The true value of the Internet of Things does not lay in the lights turning on when the car reaches the driveway, but rather the data that the connected devices collect about its users. Imagine a hospital with connected devices. The data collected from those devices outputs information on the status of patients and runs analytics on the various monitoring machine, helping the hospital to run as optimally as possible.

 

The collection of data from devices will allow consumers, businesses and even entire connected cities to run more efficiently. However, collecting large amounts of data presents challenges.

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Cyber Security in the Internet of Things

Cyber Security in the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Why do we say IoT requires new thinking about cyber security? Mainly because of the level of data sharing involved. This is a fast-evolving feature of the IoT, around which industrial equipment markets have not yet aligned. Note that we can trace the origins of the IoT to the early efforts by engineers in Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to find ways to monitor, objectively and in real time, how the machines they designed for customers actually performed in the real word. They tended to use the terms telematics and mobile resource management. Soon, however, it became clear how valuable such data would be to their colleagues in product marketing, and in turn to customer service and technical support. As for the customers themselves, they received some benefits, such as maintenance alerts but, generally speaking, they had access to little real-time data, and it was difficult to work with when they did get it.

 

Today, growing numbers of customers recognize how that data could inform their own operations, and even feel it is rightfully theirs, leading to battles over who owns and has access to what data, who is responsible for securing it, and a long list of other related questions. What's more, as systems built by different OEMs interact, there is infighting among them as to what constitutes sensitive or competitive intelligence. Simultaneously, everyone must address the question of how shared access to data exposes them to new legal liabilities with their trading partners.

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Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility

Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So what are today’s forward-thinking professionals doing with this new technology?

 

They’re finding that work is a whole lot simpler, faster and more enjoyable with data devices that can sort, synthesize and analyze data as well as collect it, and that can work seamlessly with both worksite machinery and advanced office hardware.


Take the public works sector: Government agencies and private companies across the world are using rugged technology for a wide range of tracking, monitoring, reporting and scheduling tasks essential to city maintenance — all while saving time and improving the accuracy of their data.


For example, GPS-enabled devices can tag along worry-free for messy catch-basin cleanup runs and sewer line repairs, and dashboard-mounted tablets with tracking software can simplify data collection on street-sweeping and waste-collection routes, without ill effects from constant road vibrations.


The data these computers collect can be stored, organized, charted, transmitted wirelessly to office locations, and formed into customized reports. Simple manual and sensor-based data input reduces human error and increases accuracy for record-keeping and important reporting, such as for governmental regulations or grant compliance.

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Cisco’s Lew Tucker On The Internet Of Everything And The Tie To An App-Centric World

Cisco’s Lew Tucker On The Internet Of Everything And The Tie To An App-Centric World | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Cisco’s Lew Tucker stood onstage today at Cloud Connect and pitched the networking giant’s “Internet of Everything,” an app-centric world that will be worth $14.5 trillion over the next couple of years. Whereas the Internet of Things is all the objects in our world, Tucker says the IoE is the smart grids and, really, the entire supply chain and its transformation.

 

Big enterprise companies are good at this kind of thing. They talk about huge market opportunities and great futures with tremendous upside, but it’s a question of how nimble they can be with startups innovating so fast. Tucker, however, gets credit for explaining how an app-centric world ties in with software-defined networking (SDN) and the switch from traditional, heavyweight systems of records (ERP, CRM) to systems of engagement (apps, lightweight services that provide feedback loops).

 

Tucker, citing Cisco’s own study, says there is $4.9 trillion in immediate opportunity through the development of such things as smart grids, smart factories, smart buildings and smart cities.

...

The IoE also provides a context for the ways we interact with this deep fabric of connected things. An ERP system will become less relevant for companies. Instead, systems of engagement will put us right in the center of a feedback loop that allows us to measure our own selves and in the process connect to all the other smart aspects of our life. That might be in the city of San Francisco when trying to find a parking spot or the smart factory where we order our data-generated personal things.

 

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Jerome BESSON's curator insight, November 10, 2013 10:11 AM

IoE (Internet of everything) annonce-t-il la fin des ERP et autres systèmes CRM au profit d'un  "systems of engagement (apps, lightweight services that provide feedback loops)" ou les apps. sont reines. Le principes :  les data sont déversées dans un lake par les "things"...le lake est scruté en temps réels par des applications "légères" (genre celles des smartphones) qui elles mêmes génèrent de l'intelligence qu'elles déversent à leurs tours...c'est en tout cas ce qu'annonce certain.

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The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog

The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So, what exactly is bringing the Internet of Things to fruition? A big factor is the plunging cost of connectivity, which is being driven by the emergence of Heterogeneous Networks (often referred to as “HetNets”). HetNets offer a way to increase the density and bandwidth available to mobile devices. 


To give you an idea of their potential scale, Free.fr, one of the world’s first HetNets, located in France, has more than 4 million WiFi hotspots connected to the  network and enjoys data transfer costs that are probably far below $1 per gigabyte. (...)


The second major factor driving the Internet of Things is the explosion of low-cost, smart, standardized sensor networks. Consumer hobbyists are leading the way here. Kickstarter, the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects is hosting numerous sensor projects that are designed to enable consumers to rapidly deploy and utilize large numbers of sensors around the home and office.


Raspberry Pi is one of the most popular recent initiatives in this space. The company has created a credit card-sized computer that integrates with physical devices like TVs and keyboards to give users PC functionality, such as spreadsheets and word processing, without having to buy a computer. Designed for hobbyists, it starts at a mere $25.


Another interesting initiative is Sensordrone, a multi-sensor device for smartphones that was recently funded by Kickstarter that gives phones even more capabilities, like connecting to printers. In another development, Nokia pledged to push the envelope in terms of adding new and innovative sensors and geo-location capabilities to their phones.


By Paul Brody 

30 Dec 2012


Via Spaceweaver
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Sentient World

Sentient World | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"As more and more inanimate objects start to develop data and intelligence as they connect to each other, a network of autonomous interactions will emerge. In the future, our devices will be able to manage, analyze, report, predict, forecast, and more — while humans experience their days more intelligently and efficiently. We are experiencing a shift from a world of inanimate objects and reactive devices to a world where data, intelligence, and computing power are distributed, ubiquitous, and networked. We’re seeing a variety of market forces — from sensor, data capture, and a computing processor — empower this world for consumers and organizations alike. Who will deliver the content for and based on these interactions? Who will manage the data that arises? Understanding the intersection between physical and digital, while discerning signal from noise will become base-level survival skills for organizations."


The Sentient World Meets Marketing - via Rebecca Lieb


The sentient world is no a radical future vision, it’s present reality. Readily available technologies such as smartphones, Google Goggles (and soon, Glass), augmented reality (AR), smart keys and fobs, even laptops make it increasingly easy to apply layers of content, images and information on top of object, products, and places. And at the same time, to view and experience these additional layers of content. Technology developments will soon enable more and more objects to become sentient, as Corning so elegantly depicted in its highly successful A Day Made of Glass Video.


Also see Brian Solis' presentation at Le Web about the Human API and Internet of Things (via G+ Social Business)



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the spime arrives

A short scenario written by Bruce Sterling and produced in collaboration with Scott Klinker and his students at Cranbrook Academy of Art exploring 'the internet of things' - new ways of connecting data and the physical world as a model of sustainable design.

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Towards a sensor commons | Technology Treason

Towards a sensor commons | Technology Treason | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Summary via postscapes


Andrew Fisher @ajfisher put together a lengthy post on Tuesday titled "Towards a sensor commons"


Begins with:

"The action taking place is the creation of what I call the Sensor Commons. Why is this a revolution? Because as a population we are deciding that governments and civic planners no longer have the ability to provide meaningful information at a local level."


Definition:
"For me the Sensor Commons is a future state whereby we have data available to us, in real time from a multitude of sensors that are relatively similar in design and method of data acquisition and that data is freely available whether as a data set or by API to use in whatever fashion they like.


My definition is not just about “lots of data from lots of sensors” – there is a subtlety to it implied but the “relatively similar in design and method of data acquisition” statement."


and then goes on to break down 5 things he thinks are requirements for the Sensor Commons:

  1. Gain trust
  2. Become dispersible
  3. Be highly visible
  4. Be entirely open
  5. Be upgradeable
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Making The Internet Of Things A Reality: Mobility Meets Big Data In The Cloud -- "Triple Word Score"! - Forbes

Making The Internet Of Things A Reality: Mobility Meets Big Data In The Cloud -- "Triple Word Score"! - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Basically, four key elements are required for IoTs – a) Tagging Things b) Sensing Things c) Shrinking Things and d) Thinking Things. With advances in RFID, miniaturization and analytics, M2M makes the Internet of Things an increasingly tangible possibility. Think of such M2M communication as the “social collaboration” of machine-to-machine or machine-to-man.


Such technology is beginning to mature, whether it’s smart thermostats from startups like Nest Labs or Honeywell, or what’s being called “precision retailing”, where innovations in Big Data Analytics, combined with Mobility and GPS, allow tailored promotions to be offered to consumers on their mobile devices.


by Sanjay Poonen, SAP

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Interactive, Open Source Kite Project Gets Beijing Locals to Monitor Air Quality

Interactive, Open Source Kite Project Gets Beijing Locals to Monitor Air Quality | Web of Things | Scoop.it

In August, the designers organized a series of workshops in Beijing instructing participants in the building and deployment of their own air-sensing kites using simple materials and open-source tech:


Using a combination of DIY electronics workshops and group kite flights, residents became engaged in the process of air quality monitoring for themselves, as well as seeing the data visually through LEDs, as well as stored data on SD cards. These modules use Arduino and are relatively easy to put together; workshops with local residents focused on talking about urban air quality, soldering and assembling the modules, as well as attaching them to kites.


The LEDs on the hand-built kites are programmed to indicate air quality with different colours; green being the best and pink being the worst. Data was interactively mapped in real-time using geolocation; the idea is to light up the sky with a squad of sensor kites that will give a general sense of how good or bad the air pollution is -- and to collect and parse the data in one place.


Visit Treehugger to watch Video

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The Internet of things is coming to a grocery store near you

The Internet of things is coming to a grocery store near you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Thin Film Electronics, a company that makes wafer-thin printed circuits that can be built into packaging materials, and Bemis, a manufacturer of both consumer products and wholesale packaging, have signed an agreement that will add circuits to your cereal box.


Bemis makes packaging for those products (and more) and by 2014 it hopes to use thin-film, printed electronics to add a few bits of memory and little intelligence to its packaging.


As I wrote back in October, the idea of smarter circuits that are still cheap enough to be used in packaging are integral to creating an internet of things.


Davor Sutija, the CEO of Thinfilm, envisions that the Bemis deal is a first step in packaging that will have both freshness indicators but also sensor platforms that can share data on where an item has been and what the environment was in those locations.

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The Internet of Things: how it'll revolutionise your devices

The Internet of Things: how it'll revolutionise your devices | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The age of the machines has arrived. We discover how the Internet of Things is changing how our gadgets behave.


It is suggested that consumers will be interested in "passive environmental monitoring, remote management and connectivity to everything" because it's is faster, cheaper and better."


Impacts on transportation are described:


"Is a city's free rent-a-bike scheme being used? Stick a RFID chip on the handlebars and someone can plot exactly where those bikes go, when, and who with. At night streetlights could switch on only when a car approaches – thus saving electricity – but more impressively, data could be collected to map urban travel patterns."


A Cisco-powered concept called U.Life is being developed as a global template in New Songdo City, 40 miles south of Seoul in South Korea.  The

city wide wired broadband network allows its 60,000 residents to use their smartphones, tablets and other touchscreen devices to control their homes' heating, lighting and air-con.  

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Tempo wants to be the database at the center of the Internet of things

Tempo wants to be the database at the center of the Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Once we connect 50 billion devices to the web by 2020, what will those devices talk to? Chicago Startup Tempo hopes those sensors will take to its database as a service — depositing their tiny bits of time series data inside its custom database.
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The Internet of Things: Buzzword or Big Business?

The Internet of Things: Buzzword or Big Business? | Web of Things | Scoop.it
With trillions of end-point 'things', device cloud platforms, subnets for humans, machines, sensor networks and rampant innovation being fostered globally, the Internet of Things could have the same disruptive potential as the Internet itself.

 

Building on the foundation of the IoT, the Cisco (CSCO) vision is the Internet of Everything, which it defines as bringing together people, process, data, and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before. Cisco believes that there is a $14.4 trillion value at stake in this market, which combines the increased revenues and lower costs that is created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022. The factors driving the trend include mainstreaming of sensors, cloud computing and the migration of everything to IP networks.

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Welcome To A Fully Programmable World Where All Objects Act as One

Welcome To A Fully Programmable World Where All Objects Act as One | Web of Things | Scoop.it

We are surrounded by tiny, intelligent devices that capture data about how we live and what we do. Soon we'll be able to choreograph them to respond to our needs, solve our problems, and even save our lives.

 

Imagine a factory where every machine, every room, feeds back information to solve problems on the production line. Imagine a hotel room (like the ones at the Aria in Las Vegas) where the lights, the stereo, and the window shade are not just controlled from a central station but adjust to your preferences before you even walk in. Think of a gym where the machines know your workout as soon as you arrive, or a medical device that can point toward the closest defibrillator when you have a heart attack. Consider a hybrid car—like the new Ford Fusion—that can maximize energy efficiency by drawing down the battery as it nears a charging station.

 

There are few more appropriate guides to this impending future than Hawkinson, whose DC-based startup, SmartThings, has built what’s arguably the most advanced hub to tie connected objects together. At his house, more than 200 objects, from the garage door to the coffeemaker to his daughter’s trampoline, are all connected to his SmartThings system. His office can automatically text his wife when he leaves and tell his home A/C system to start powering up.

 

In this future, the intelligence once locked in our devices now flows into the universe of physical objects. Technologists have struggled to name this emerging phenomenon. Some have called it the Internet of Things or the Internet of Everything or the Industrial Internet—despite the fact that most of these devices aren’t actually on the Internet directly but instead communicate through simple wireless protocols. Other observers, paying homage to the stripped-down tech embedded in so many smart devices, are calling it the Sensor Revolution.

 

But here’s a better way to think about what we’re building: It’s the Programmable World. After all, what’s remarkable about this future isn’t the sensors, nor is it that all our sensors and objects and devices are linked together. It’s the fact that once we get enough of these objects onto our networks, they’re no longer one-off novelties or data sources but instead become a coherent system, a vast ensemble that can be choreographed, a body that can dance. Really, it’s the opposite of an “Internet,” a term that even today—in the era of the cloud and the app and the walled garden—connotes a peer-to-peer system in which each node is equally empowered. By contrast, these connected objects will act more like a swarm of drones, a distributed legion of bots, far-flung and sometimes even hidden from view but nevertheless coordinated as if they were a single giant machine.

 

For the Programmable World to reach its full potential, we need to pass through three stages. The first is simply the act of getting more devices onto the network—more sensors, more processors in everyday objects, more wireless hookups to extract data from the processors that already exist. The second is to make those devices rely on one another, coordinating their actions to carry out simple tasks without any human intervention. The third and final stage, once connected things become ubiquitous, is to understand them as a system to be programmed, a bona fide platform that can run software in much the same manner that a computer or smartphone can.

 

Once we get there, that system will transform the world of everyday objects into a design­able environment, a playground for coders and engineers. It will change the whole way we think about the division between the virtual and the physical. This might sound like a scary encroachment of technology, but the Programmable World could actually let us put more of our gadgets away, automating activities we normally do by hand and putting intelligence from the cloud into everything we touch.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Tom Leckrone
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CAEXI BEST's curator insight, May 15, 2013 2:21 PM
Bienvenue dans un monde entièrement programmable où tous les objets agissent comme un seul
Tom Leckrone's curator insight, May 26, 2013 7:03 AM

Excerpt: "The third and final stage, once connected things become ubiquitous, is to understand them as a system to be programmed, a bona fide platform that can run software in much the same manner that a computer or smartphone can." 

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The internet of things: an elephant in the room that threatens to squash us

The internet of things: an elephant in the room that threatens to squash us | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Andy Hobsbawm's (one of the founders of the business EVRYTHNG) business gives me a headache quite quickly as I struggle to imagine the implications of the humungous data generated by everything we touch. And then there's the data generated by mixing up the data with other data in order to create more data that predicts the future and reshapes our existence. Got that? Just a little scary, yes?

 

I don't mind my bike or my fridge talking about my habits but the implications of underwear or individual deodorants having their own Facebook page, or the web-of-things equivalent, is mind-boggling. What if - oh dear, how embarrassing - you don't appear to have a deodorant life? Too much information or not enough, either way as we become even more defined by our consumption this could get vicious. I can sense a lobby forming to say our rights are being eroded in ways that go way beyond what Google's done to us so far.

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2013: The year of the Internet of Things

2013: The year of the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Arkady Zaslavsky and pals at Australia’s national scientific research organisation, CSIRO, reveal how the enabling technologies that Ashton imagined have rapidly matured and that the Internet of Things is finally poised to burst into the mainstream.


Each year in Australia, for example, biologists plant a million or so plots of different types of grain to see which grow best in a wide variety of conditions. These plots are situated all over the country and create a logistical nightmare for the relatively small team who must monitor both the environmental conditions and the rate of growth of the plants.


Their solution is a wireless sensor network that monitors what’s going on and sends the data back to the High Resolution Plant Phenomics Centre in Canberra which runs the experiments.

 

These sensors are currently deployed at just 40 sites and generate some 2 million data points per week. But the widespread adoption of this kind of technology looks set to revolutionise this kind of testing. What’s more, various cloud-based services are emerging that are designed to help manage these kinds of sensors and the data they produce. 


MIT Technology Review

via The Physics arXiv Blog

04 Jan 2013

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Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things

Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A fourth revolution (after the agricultural, industrial and information revolutions) is almost upon us: the age of the 'trillion-node network', also known as The Internet of Things.


Widespread machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is bringing about the Internet of Things — or 'the trillion-node network', as the authors of this book put it. Trillions: Thriving in the Emerging Information Ecology, which is written by the three principals of MAYA Design (a Pittsburgh-based design consultancy and technology research lab), addresses the problem of how to cope with an internet comprising trillions of nodes, the majority of which do not have a person directly controlling them. Peter Lucas, Joe Ballay and Mickey McManus warn of the chaotic complexity that's in danger of developing, and offer suggestions as to how to design a digital future in which "The data are no longer in the computers. We have come to see that the computers are in the data".


Up next is 'design science', an evolving discipline founded on a mixture of natural ecological patterns, professional design practices, traditional science and "a commitment to the search for underlying Architecture to provide structure". Key to the successful practice of design science, say the authors, will be: "Deeply interdisciplinary methods; Focusing on humans; Interaction physics; Information-centric interaction design; and Computation in context". 


The final two chapters attempt to discern what life will be like in the pervasive-computing world of the trillion-node network, without — wisely — being too specific. We are introduced to the concept of an 'information ecology' comprising 'life forms' (devices), 'currency' (information), architectures (information architecture and device architecture) and 'the environment' (human culture). Certain desirable properties emerge from such thinking, including resilience built on widespread redundancy, diversity and the embracing of stochastic processes.


ZDNet

Charles McLellan

10 Dec 2012

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The End Of The Smartphone Era Is Coming

The End Of The Smartphone Era Is Coming | Web of Things | Scoop.it

You've heard that Google is working on computerized glasses. They're called Google Glass, and developers can already buy them. It turns out Microsoft is working on something similar. It filed some patents on the project. There's a big difference between what Microsoft is working on and Google Glass, though. The most recent word out of Google is that Google Glass isn't going to use "augmented reality" – where data and illustrations overlay the actual world around you.

 


Via The Asymptotic Leap
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curiousjohn's comment, November 26, 2012 4:12 PM
Didn't know Microsoft was working on glasses. huh.
The Asymptotic Leap's comment, November 27, 2012 9:32 AM
curiousjohn: Take a look at the new post about Vuzix.
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Smart Body, Smart World: The Next Phase of Personal Computing

Smart Body, Smart World: The Next Phase of Personal Computing | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The next wave of growth in personal computing won’t come from PCs (obviously) or even phones, but from sensor-laden devices.


(...) Sometimes these sensor-laden devices are called the Internet of Things, but I don’t think that fully captures the phenomenon I’m describing. I call it “Smart Body, Smart World,” because the devices themselves (the “things”) are not the point — it’s about the data they collect, the way the data is interpreted, and the smarter decisions we make when we have access to these sensor-sourced data and insights.


Sarah Rotman Epps (@srepps) is a Senior Analyst serving Consumer Product Strategy professionals at Forrester Research. To learn more about this research, visit the full report here.

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Dragonfly spy drone technology could make data centers more green

Dragonfly spy drone technology could make data centers more green | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Tiny ribbons that generate electricity when flexed and flex when stimulated with electricity have been developed to flap the wings of mechanical dragonfly spy drones, but the technology can also find uses ranging from powering iPods and cell phones...


Tiny ribbons that generate electricity when flexed and flex when stimulated with electricity have been developed to flap the wings of mechanical dragonfly spy drones, but the technology can also find uses ranging from powering iPods and cell phones to charging batteries by converting to electricity the vibration of devices deployed in data centers. (...)


Researchers at Princeton University have embedded these brittle ribbons in silicone rubber, allowing them to flex and also protect them from environments where they might be deployed, such as in shoes - to capture mechanical energy as people walk in them - or implanted within humans - to capture the motion of lungs to power pacemakers. (...)


Power generation using the PZT ribbons is similar to solar cells except that solar cells require sunshine. "Here you need to continuously generate motion to power things," he says. PZT is also more efficient than solar cells, which capture 25% of the energy they absorb. PZT captures 80%, McAlpine says.

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The Internet of Things: A Boom for Hosting » Data Center Knowledge

The Internet of Things: A Boom for Hosting » Data Center Knowledge | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The “Internet of Things” will transform the hosting and data center industries, generating a tidal wave of data that will prompt companies to enlist third-party providers to help them manage it, according to analyst Rachel Chalmers.


An ‘Inflection Point’ Ahead

Even greater opportunities lie ahead, said Chalmers, driven by the proliferation of Internet-enabled devices, known as the Internet of Things.


“There’s an inflection point coming that will dramatically raise the stakes and rewards,” said Chalmers. “Every single (enterprise) is in the process of redefining themselves as an information company. We believe hosting and managed services providers stand to be the main beneficiaries of this trend.”


The trend has begin in earnest with smartphones, but will accelerate as more devices and sensors become web-enabled and share data to help companies understand consumer behavior and business trends.


Mobile as a Precursor Market

“The Internet of mobile devices is already here,” said Chalmers. “There is a far bigger constellation of end points on the horizon. The numbers are poised to explode. We deeply believe that mobile is a precursor market for the Internet of things.”


The volume of data generated by all those devices will test the existing infrastructure for many enterprises, Chalmers said.

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When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data

When Wireless Sensors Meet Big Data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

They're in vending machines, parking meters, home security systems, and even healthcare devices for the elderly. They are wireless sensors, a key component of the burgeoning machine-to-machine (M2M) industry where devices use wired and wireless connections to communicate with each other. Though far from new, M2M technology is expanding its reach at a dramatic rate.

 

M2M connections will grow to 2.1 billion by 2021, up from roughly 100 million last year, according to research firm Analysis Mason. The dramatic growth of global smartphone usage is a major factor in M2M's popularity, of course, as are industrial applications in the transportation, emergency services, security, and retail sectors.

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A Phone that Knows Where You're Going

A Phone that Knows Where You're Going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

An algorithm can better predict your future movements by getting a little help from your friends.


Researchers in the U.K. have come up with an algorithm that follows your own mobility patterns and adjusts for anomalies by factoring in the patterns of people in your social group (defined as people who are mutual contacts on each other's smartphones).


All of the study participants lived within 30 miles of Lausanne, Switzerland, and were mainly "students, researchers, and people that are fairly predictable anyway." But the findings are considered noteworthy because they exploit the "synchronized rhythm of the city" for greater predictive insights.


The paper was part of a Nokia-sponsored Mobile Data Challenge grew out of another mid-2000s reality mining project sponsored by Nokia.

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The power of crowd data sharing

The power of crowd data sharing | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A few cities have begun to share their data in the hopes of developing solutions to problems. As an example, we can mention New York and its NY City Big Apps, where programmers are challenged with $50,000 to develop applications that use the city’s Open Data database. The goal is not only to better the lives of those living in the Big Apple, but also to promote innovation and economic development through new start-ups that create new business models. Other similar projects include those in Zaragoza, Spain and Europe’s Open Cities project — which is now accepting ideas until September for a chance to win €3,000.

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