Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Smart Body, Smart World: The Next Phase of Personal Computing

Smart Body, Smart World: The Next Phase of Personal Computing | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The next wave of growth in personal computing won’t come from PCs (obviously) or even phones, but from sensor-laden devices.


(...) Sometimes these sensor-laden devices are called the Internet of Things, but I don’t think that fully captures the phenomenon I’m describing. I call it “Smart Body, Smart World,” because the devices themselves (the “things”) are not the point — it’s about the data they collect, the way the data is interpreted, and the smarter decisions we make when we have access to these sensor-sourced data and insights.


Sarah Rotman Epps (@srepps) is a Senior Analyst serving Consumer Product Strategy professionals at Forrester Research. To learn more about this research, visit the full report here.

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TedWomen: Amber Case on Cyborg Anthropology

Amber Case is a "cyborg anthropologist" studying how technology is affecting us, and how we in turn affect one another. Tweeting your lunch can have meaning.
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Intel Dabbles In Science Fiction

Intel Dabbles In Science Fiction | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Over the last few years, Intel futurist Rob Johnson explains, Intel has been running a “futurecasting lab,” where the company whiteboards what the future will look like. The effects-based models help guide Intel’s product development; Intel is working on its 2019 model right now.


In 2020, however, “something remarkable happens,” Johnson writes. “As we pass 2020, the size of meaningful computational power approaches zero.” In other words, with a microprocessor that small, you can put a computer in just about anything.


“When you get intelligence that small, you can turn anything into a computer,” Johnson writes. “You could turn a table into a computer. All of a sudden, it’s possible to turn your shirt, your chair, even your own body into a computer.”


And in some sense, that’s what Intel showed off in a series of demonstrations on Monday - intelligent interactions between various devices, some containing their own electronic eyes and ears. The goal was to use technology as a bridge between man and machine to facilitate context.

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