Web of Things
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How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother?

Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Say goodbye to privacy: In the future, advertisers, app makers, the government, and even our employers might be able to assess our personalities and react based on what we do with our phones.


Oliver Brdiczka, a manager at PARC, is working on contextual intelligence. The research, he hopes, will allow enterprises and the government to use data that is accumulated as we use our mobile phones. The data mined from our email messages, Facebook conversations, and sensors in the phone can be used for a variety of purposes, including intelligence, marketing and app design, even employee relations. In other words, owning a smart phone with this capability will be like having a spy ratting out your thoughts to the government.


For instance, PARC is working on a project that predicts a person's personality through their online behavior. The idea, Brdiczka said, is to market this data to enterprises, who want to know people's intent for targeted advertising or developing content customization. (...)


"Imagine a device that immediately lights up when you hold it in your hand and offers you the five most likely things you were going to do next: call your co-worker, drive to the meeting you're about to have, book a dinner or catch up on that article that you wanted to read," said Cue CEO Daniel Gross. "We'll be able to breathe life into our current phones, which currently only do things when we explicitly tell them every detail of what we want to do."

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Mobile and the Internet of Things enable contextual-intelligence

Mobile not only increases the reach of services but it provides additional context, such as location and presence. Location technologies–such as triangulation, wireless location signatures, and GPS–will be combined to provide rich indoor and outdoor location for both people and things. In the future, embedded sensors that provide environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature will be commonplace. Sensors will provide another aspect of context that services can tap into.


For example, your mobile device has access to your calendar so it knows if you’re running late for a meeting in downtown L.A. It can alert your car to connect to services like Streetline to help you find an available (sensor-enabled) parking spot while alerting your manager that you’re late. Other examples could link contextual attributes, such as presence and location, with enterprise social software. Instead of using a paging system, a nurse could use enterprise social software on a tablet to locate an available cardiologist on the third floor of a hospital and a defibrillator on the fourth floor.

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Mariana Soffer's comment, June 19, 2012 1:40 PM
very interesting
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The ultimate form of sensing

The ultimate form of sensing | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Justin Rattner ended the keynote with a look into the next 5 - 10 years of computing. Intel is working with CMU researchers on sensing brain waves. Feeding the results of those types of sensors into computing devices can enable a completely new level of context aware computing. That's the holy grail after all, if your smartphone, PC, or other computing device is not only aware of your external context but what you're thinking.

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How the Internet of Things could change Australian homes and businesses

Many of the barriers to adopting the Internet of Things in the home revolve around design issues. For example, Williams says a substantial amount of intelligence is required to enable alerts to be sent when the user wants to receive them – not when the events actually occur. (...)

 

The Internet of Things not only has potential in the home, but businesses could also benefit from it to find out what is happening in real time. For example, it could be used to track the exact location of parcels or drivers. (...)

 

Google has already made a move into this area, with the release in June this year of Google Maps Coordinate which allows businesses to track exactly where employees are located through Google Maps. (...)

 

There are numerous issues around privacy and security. For example, allowing a fridge to connect to the internet could create potential holes for hackers to get into personal networks. How readily consumers will accept these potential invasions of privacy remain to be seen, Williams says, but a tightening of online security will help.

 

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into the fabric of the world around us

History and Precedent in Interaction, Technology, and Experience
Context - Jon Kolko [pdf]

 

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