Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility

Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So what are today’s forward-thinking professionals doing with this new technology?

 

They’re finding that work is a whole lot simpler, faster and more enjoyable with data devices that can sort, synthesize and analyze data as well as collect it, and that can work seamlessly with both worksite machinery and advanced office hardware.


Take the public works sector: Government agencies and private companies across the world are using rugged technology for a wide range of tracking, monitoring, reporting and scheduling tasks essential to city maintenance — all while saving time and improving the accuracy of their data.


For example, GPS-enabled devices can tag along worry-free for messy catch-basin cleanup runs and sewer line repairs, and dashboard-mounted tablets with tracking software can simplify data collection on street-sweeping and waste-collection routes, without ill effects from constant road vibrations.


The data these computers collect can be stored, organized, charted, transmitted wirelessly to office locations, and formed into customized reports. Simple manual and sensor-based data input reduces human error and increases accuracy for record-keeping and important reporting, such as for governmental regulations or grant compliance.

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Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things

Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A fourth revolution (after the agricultural, industrial and information revolutions) is almost upon us: the age of the 'trillion-node network', also known as The Internet of Things.


Widespread machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is bringing about the Internet of Things — or 'the trillion-node network', as the authors of this book put it. Trillions: Thriving in the Emerging Information Ecology, which is written by the three principals of MAYA Design (a Pittsburgh-based design consultancy and technology research lab), addresses the problem of how to cope with an internet comprising trillions of nodes, the majority of which do not have a person directly controlling them. Peter Lucas, Joe Ballay and Mickey McManus warn of the chaotic complexity that's in danger of developing, and offer suggestions as to how to design a digital future in which "The data are no longer in the computers. We have come to see that the computers are in the data".


Up next is 'design science', an evolving discipline founded on a mixture of natural ecological patterns, professional design practices, traditional science and "a commitment to the search for underlying Architecture to provide structure". Key to the successful practice of design science, say the authors, will be: "Deeply interdisciplinary methods; Focusing on humans; Interaction physics; Information-centric interaction design; and Computation in context". 


The final two chapters attempt to discern what life will be like in the pervasive-computing world of the trillion-node network, without — wisely — being too specific. We are introduced to the concept of an 'information ecology' comprising 'life forms' (devices), 'currency' (information), architectures (information architecture and device architecture) and 'the environment' (human culture). Certain desirable properties emerge from such thinking, including resilience built on widespread redundancy, diversity and the embracing of stochastic processes.


ZDNet

Charles McLellan

10 Dec 2012

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Intel futurist Brian David Johnson on creating the tech of tomorrow

Intel futurist Brian David Johnson on creating the tech of tomorrow | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Intel, which employs more than 4,000 people in Ireland, relies on futurists like Brian David Johnson to deliver a vision of how we will be using technology in the future.

 

Eventually Johnson sees the devices getting smaller, thinner and almost invisible.

 

“When you talk about silicon architecture, right now we are at 22 nanometres, which is extremely tiny. When you look to 2020, the size of meaningful computational devices could reach almost zero. Moore’s Law will keep going until we get to virtually zero.

 

“The next big focus for Intel is seven nanometres. When we get to that level, chips will be so small that they can be powered by friction, the heat of your body or the movement of your hand.

 

“Once you have computation moving to almost zero, it means we can make anything into a computer.

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Raspberry Pi, and enabling tinkerers

"The internet of things doesn’t come from some giant company blessing your washing machine with a finicky protocol that only talks to their servers and feeds you data though their portal. It comes from millions of geeks everywhere doing it themselves because its just recently become cheap enough and easy enough. Communities form and open protocols develop. The marketplace keeps the whole community loosely united and Andriod explodes into, well, everything. Its a great big ball of win."

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The Ubiquitous Computing Revolution is Here

"Ubiquitous computing is defined as a state where mobile devices, such as the iPad, cloud computing applications (such as Google Docs or Onlive) and high speed wireless networks (such as 4G or large area Wi-Fi), combine to eliminate the "computer" as the central medium for accessing digital services. With every car, camera, tablet, wristwatch, and TV screen having access to nearly unlimited computing power, prices will drop dramatically, capabilities will increase and computers will fade so thoroughly into the background that users won’t even know they are there."

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Authenticate or Die - Forbes

Authenticate or Die - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet:

"That anonymity—one of the few serious flaws in the design of the Internet—is giving the bad guys plenty of cover and keeping society as a whole from fully benefiting from what the Internet has to offer.

 

And this situation is only going to get worse as we move to what’s been dubbed the “Internet of Things.”

 

It’s a world where the line between what’s a computer and what’s not a computer gets increasingly blurred, and every device we have looks, smells, and behaves more and more like a computer. The smartphone is the most obvious example, but now you can add things such as cars, medical devices, household appliances, almost every device in your a/v cabinet and more. Increasingly, the things in our everyday infrastructure are gaining the intelligence and the processing power of computers, which means they’re also vulnerable to attack."

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The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog

The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So, what exactly is bringing the Internet of Things to fruition? A big factor is the plunging cost of connectivity, which is being driven by the emergence of Heterogeneous Networks (often referred to as “HetNets”). HetNets offer a way to increase the density and bandwidth available to mobile devices. 


To give you an idea of their potential scale, Free.fr, one of the world’s first HetNets, located in France, has more than 4 million WiFi hotspots connected to the  network and enjoys data transfer costs that are probably far below $1 per gigabyte. (...)


The second major factor driving the Internet of Things is the explosion of low-cost, smart, standardized sensor networks. Consumer hobbyists are leading the way here. Kickstarter, the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects is hosting numerous sensor projects that are designed to enable consumers to rapidly deploy and utilize large numbers of sensors around the home and office.


Raspberry Pi is one of the most popular recent initiatives in this space. The company has created a credit card-sized computer that integrates with physical devices like TVs and keyboards to give users PC functionality, such as spreadsheets and word processing, without having to buy a computer. Designed for hobbyists, it starts at a mere $25.


Another interesting initiative is Sensordrone, a multi-sensor device for smartphones that was recently funded by Kickstarter that gives phones even more capabilities, like connecting to printers. In another development, Nokia pledged to push the envelope in terms of adding new and innovative sensors and geo-location capabilities to their phones.


By Paul Brody 

30 Dec 2012


Via Spaceweaver
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Intel Dabbles In Science Fiction

Intel Dabbles In Science Fiction | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Over the last few years, Intel futurist Rob Johnson explains, Intel has been running a “futurecasting lab,” where the company whiteboards what the future will look like. The effects-based models help guide Intel’s product development; Intel is working on its 2019 model right now.


In 2020, however, “something remarkable happens,” Johnson writes. “As we pass 2020, the size of meaningful computational power approaches zero.” In other words, with a microprocessor that small, you can put a computer in just about anything.


“When you get intelligence that small, you can turn anything into a computer,” Johnson writes. “You could turn a table into a computer. All of a sudden, it’s possible to turn your shirt, your chair, even your own body into a computer.”


And in some sense, that’s what Intel showed off in a series of demonstrations on Monday - intelligent interactions between various devices, some containing their own electronic eyes and ears. The goal was to use technology as a bridge between man and machine to facilitate context.

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You Will Want Google Goggles - Technology Review

You Will Want Google Goggles - Technology Review | Web of Things | Scoop.it

When Google unveiled Project Glass, many people shared my early take, criticizing the plan as just too geeky for the masses. But while it will take some time to get used to interactive goggles as a mainstream necessity, we have already gotten used to wearable electronics such as headphones, Bluetooth headsets, and health and sleep monitoring devices. And even though you don't exactly wear your smart phone, it derives its utility from its immediate proximity to your body.


In fact, wearable computers could end up being a fashion statement. They actually fit into a larger history of functional wearable objects—think of glasses, monocles, wristwatches, and whistles. "There's a lot of things we wear today that are just decorative, just jewelry," says Travis ­Bogard, vice president of product management and strategy at Jawbone, which makes a line of fashion-conscious Bluetooth headsets. "When we talk about this new stuff, we think about it as 'functional jewelry.'" The trick for makers of wearable machines, Bogard explains, is to add utility to jewelry without negatively affecting aesthetics.


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Raspberry Pi, a Tiny But Powerful $25 PC, Coming Soon

Raspberry Pi, a Tiny But Powerful $25 PC, Coming Soon | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Note: PC's are getting smaller and cheaper.  Soon everyone will be able to have one, including all of your "things".  #M2M

 

"The final Raspberry Pi will come in two flavors: A $25 version with 128MB of RAM and no network connection and a $35 one with256MB and Ethernet. Both versions will have USB and HDMI ports as well as analog video and audio outputs. It’s driven by a The 1080p video magic is driven by a 700MHz ARM processor, and the whole thing is powered by a 5-volt power supply."

 

via Mashable

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Computing spreads far beyond "computers"

Computing spreads far beyond "computers" | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"For years, we've heard about how the physical world will become an "Internet of things" and people can, Tron Legacy-like, touch the walls of buildings like they're operating a tablet computer. For the most part, the vision of ubiquitous computing is still just vision. But computing is steadily expanding beyond its traditional confines.


First take a look at your driveway. Cars are becoming Internet-connected, letting people stream music or schedule when their electric batteries are recharged. It's happening in the home, too.


The Nest thermostat isn't the first to be WiFi-enabled, but if it proves popular, it will get more people used to operating their homes from a smart phone or tablet the way they'd check their Facebook status.


Increasingly, the Internet is reaching beyond PCs and phones to sensors. The JawBone wrist sensor, which plugs into smart phones to help people track their sleep or exercise, is just one type of sensor that connects to more powerful computers in the cloud. Imagine sensors on bridges sending off alerts when they detect a structural flaw or smart meters providing a real-time read on energy or water consumption for a more efficient grid."

 

via CNET

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