Web of Things
13.0K views | +0 today
Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Cisco: $500B in Internet of Everything Opportunities Wasted

Cisco’s extension of the concept of the Internet of Things, or sensor-driven, machine-to-machine Internet traffic into a kind of anything-to-anything network of free-flying data was first and foremost on the company’s mind at its gathering in Boston. And while the company has big numbers to back that up – its figures estimate $14.4 trillion in net profit will be driven over the next 10 years by this movement – it seems very much like a “watch this space” message. Many solution providers that Channelnomics talked to at the show were intrigued by the possibilities, but saw little applicability to their business today.

However, the company’s latest research on the subject may change those eyes from glazing to popped, as the company says that across 21 different use cases for the Internet of Everything (IoE), companies around the world will capture $614 billion in value this year alone. But the bigger news for channel partners is how much is being left on the table. Cisco’s study says that businesses feel there’s another $544 billion this year that could be captured through Internet of Everything types of solutions, but ultimately will not be.

 

Cisco president of sales and development Rob Lloyd suggests that the challenge "involves changing things like business models and company cultures, dismantling command-and-control structures on which many companies are built and establishing processes and systems whereby information is fed to the right people at the right time, and those people are empowered to act on it as quickly as possible."  


more...
ddrrnt's comment, July 24, 2013 12:48 AM
reScoop'd to the Anticipate Change community: https://plus.google.com/u/0/110222099517107483451/posts/4gCLFYG1Yi4
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

4 Myths about the Internet of Things

Interesting read Kishore Swaminathan, Chief Scientist at Accenture, on the possibilities of the Internet of Things and the myths of the things that are stopping the thing called the Internet of things happening.

 

Myth 1: IoT is a Technology. IoT is a concept, not a technology you would buy. (See also: http://thebln.com/2013/04/the-internet-of-things-a-definition-according-to-cisco/).

 

Myth 2: IoT is the next wave of the Internet. The closest some devices will get to the Internet is using TCP/IP protocols.

 

Myth 3: Regulations on data privacy is a critical enabler of the IoT. Privacy concerns might give rise to more innovative business models, but that is no reason to hold off on understanding what the IoT means for businesses.

 

Myth 4: IoT needs device communication standards. Standards never hurt but most devices will be communicating for specialist and limited reasons.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Future iPads to Implement Vicinity Sensors for Enterprise Use - Patently Apple

Future iPads to Implement Vicinity Sensors for Enterprise Use - Patently Apple | Web of Things | Scoop.it
On June 30, 2011, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals various new advanced vicinity sensors coming to future iPads.


New vicinity sensors coming to the iPad include RFID, Infrared and Ultrasonic. The latter utilizes advanced 3D scanning and imaging capablilities. The advanced sensors are designed to locate office equipment anywhere within an enterprise and could actually devise floor plans to properly located devices. Users will also be able to drag document icons to the printer or videos and/or art to a video projector for a presentation using Keynote or Power Point. Without a doubt, Apple is aiming to further advance the iPad into the enterprise. (...)


For example, one or more of an indoor GPS, a Bluetooth antenna, a radio frequency identification (RFID) device, an ultrasonic device, an infrared device, and so forth, may be used to determine if apparatuses are in the vicinity. In some embodiments, the same technology used to find devices in the vicinity of the electronic device may be used to determine the identification of the device. For example, RFID may be used to determine the presence of a particular device and the device's identifying information. In other embodiments, a first technology may be used to determine if apparatuses are in the vicinity of the electronic device and a second technology may be used to obtain identifying information. More information on this is presented below under "Indoor Global Positioning Scheme."



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Digital Bottle Cap Augurs The Internet Of Alcohol-Based Things

Digital Bottle Cap Augurs The Internet Of Alcohol-Based Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

London-based Work Club’s latest project offers a chance to start an evening out on the town with friends with, quite literally, a bang.


London-based Work Club’s latest project offers a chance to start an evening out on the town with friends with, quite literally, a bang. The digital agency’s new work for Strongbow Gold Cider is a digitally connected bottle cap called StartCap which when flipped becomes a trigger for something to happen--anything from automatically checking you into Foursquare to activating a spotlight or firing a glitter cannon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Mirror, Mirror, What's the Weather?

The industry of Web-connected devices, or what some analysts call the machine-to-machine market, is expected to vault in size in the coming years: CapGemini estimates that the world M2M market will be worth €27.4 billion (US$35 billion) by 2013.

...

The Cybertecture Mirror cost about HK$15 million (US$1.9 million) to develop, says Mr. Law, whose company began work on the product about three years ago. "With all the development costs we, don't see ourselves breaking even unless we make dramatically huge sales," says Mr. Law, who says the company took the project on as a "semi-innovation venture" and isn't likely to break even for two to three years.


He sees a future in other related products, such as backpacks that help parents track whether children arrive safely at school, or chairs that monitor your health.


The challenge for many of these products is how to bring them to consumers at an affordable price: The Cybertecture Mirror, for example, retails for US$5,000. The company is hoping to bring the price tag closer to US$1,000.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Waiting for the Internet of Things – DC Velocity

More than a decade ago, radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology pioneer Kevin Ashton coined the term "Internet of Things." The idea was that every item, product, or "thing" would have a unique identifier just as every computer does on the Internet. RF tags, of course, would provide the means by which these things could be tracked and identified.

 

For logistics managers, the Internet of Things would be a game changer. Among other benefits, it would make it possible to track the flow of goods into and out of a warehouse at the item level. Some retailers and consumer packaged goods manufacturers are already experimenting with item-level tracking. Nonetheless, it appears that the ability to track everything is still several years away.

 

Why? A recent report from Frost & Sullivan ("Analysis of the Active RFID and Sensor Networks Market") offers some insight into the barriers to making the Internet of Things a reality. One of the top challenges, it notes, is getting more companies to buy the type of tags necessary to make this possible. (...)

 

As for why users are shying away from active tags, there are a couple of reasons. First, there's the lack of common industry standards. While passive tags use data standards developed by the EPCglobal consortium, there's no such system in place for active tags. At the moment, makers of active tags use different technology protocols, such as Wi-Fi, Rubee, Zigbee, ultra wide band, infrared, and ultrasound. All of those protocols require different standards, hindering widescale adoption of the technology. (...)

 

Although a standard would hasten the adoption of active tags, there's still another obstacle—cost. Bhattacharya says a passive basic tag goes for $2 to $5 per unit,while an active tag costs between $10 and $15. And that's the low end of the range. If those tags are embedded with sensors and support multiple technologies, the cost of an active tag can top $100 per unit.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Internet of Things
Scoop.it!

Too many obstacles to 'smart homes' anytime soon: Pew Research

A lot of the elements of the much-anticipated “smart home” will be arriving on the scene by 2020, but the idea of a very smart, well-connected house may still be quite a ways off. That’s the takeaway from a new survey of 1,021 Internet experts, researchers, observers, and critics, released by the Pew Research Center. Respondents are fairly evenly split between those who agreed that energy- and money-saving "smart systems" will be significantly closer to reality in people's homes by 2020 and those who said such homes will still remain a “marketing mirage.”


Some 51% agreed with the statement that by 2020, “the connected household has become a model of efficiency, as people are able to manage consumption of resources (electricity, water, food, even bandwidth) in ways that place less of a burden on the environment while saving households money.”


via SmartPlanet.com (blog)


Via Richard Kastelein
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

How's this for cool? T-Mobile is connecting ice machines

How's this for cool? T-Mobile is connecting ice machines | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Raco Wireless, T-Mobile’s machine-to-machine communications outsourcer, is working with an ice machine vendor to connect hundreds of thousands of these machines across the country, Raco President John Horn told me at the Connected World conference this week. He wouldn’t reveal the company, nor the timing. Horn would only say that the whole business of selling bagged ice in this country is about to significantly change.

 

Why on earth would you connect a bagged-ice machine? It’s the ideal use case for an M2M app, Horn said. The boxes can alert ice vendors when they start running low on inventory. They can send out a warning if the temperature of the machine rises above freezing or the refrigeration assembly appears to be malfunctioning, allowing the company to dispatch a repairman before the machine’s contents turn to slush. Horn said Raco is even working with the vendor to install remote payment terminals so customers can buy their ice on the spot and outside of business hours.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Are You Ready for the Machine-to-Machine Revolution? - Forbes

Are You Ready for the Machine-to-Machine Revolution? - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Imagine a refrigerated cabinet or vending machine able to communicate its state, announcing if it is powered on, at the right temperature, well stocked, with the right product mix, at the right location, how shoppers interact with it, if it is due for routine maintenance and so on.

 

Now imagine millions of such machines worldwide, adding up to a sizeable business for a company. Imagine each machine offering shoppers the ability to pay for the product in multiple smart ways through other devices (smart phones, smart cards, touch screen, etc). Imagine the enterprise being able to remotely and dynamically tune the machine with advertising, pricing, promotions, bundling, language and currency. Imagine the machine tailoring an offer to a shopper that it recognizes as a loyal customer (if the shopper allows it).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Dual RFID-ZigBee sensors to enable NFC applications for the Internet of Things | ECN: Electronic Component News

Zaragoza, Spain-based Libelium has launched a new RFID/NFC module for its Waspmote sensor platform. The new radio module extends Waspmote features allowing the sensor data to be used in Location Based Services (LBS), such as asset tracking, supply chain monitoring, intelligent shopping or access management.

 

By using RFID/NFC (passive sensors) along with ZigBee (active sensors), Libelium says asset tracking can be more accurate than ever along the whole supply chain process. Product management software such as ERPs will have access in real time to information related to remaining stock, storage and transportation conditions (temperature and humidity levels, vibrations, light exposure, etc), expiration dates and even consumer profiles, knowing time spent in front of a shelf or products picked up and not bought.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Tacocopter Aims To Deliver Tacos Using Unmanned Drone Helicopters

Tacocopter Aims To Deliver Tacos Using Unmanned Drone Helicopters | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Internet is going wild for Tacocopter, perhaps the next great startup out of Silicon Valley, which boasts a business plan that combines four of the most prominent touchstones of modern America: tacos, helicopters, robots and laziness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Embedded platform developers must accelerate development of intelligent systems, says Microsoft

Embedded platform developers must accelerate development of intelligent systems, says Microsoft | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The integration of the three major IT application technologies, embedded systems, the Internet of Things (IoT), and cloud computing architecture, will trigger an "intelligent system" revolution in the conventional embedded device market creating completely new life, work and decision-making experiences for business managers, employees and general consumers. Microsoft Corporation OEM Embedded Sales Manager, Daniel Li thinks that OEMs must seize the huge business opportunities generated by this revolution, and actively recruit the resources from mature development and management platforms already available on the market to develop the intelligent systems that businesses need. Only by doing so can they stand a chance to succeed in future competition.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Research and Markets: Australia - Telstra - Analysis of the Telstra Transition -

Ever since David Thodey took over the reins at Australia's largest telco Telstra has embraced the new direction being taken by the telecoms industry, based on a ubiquitous, robust, affordable infrastructure that can be used to lift telecommunications into the next stage, where the business opportunities will be rather different from those of the past. This is the brave new world of internet media, Internet of Things, where a range of new industry sectors will take centre-stage. These include healthcare, education, energy, commerce and media.

 

via The Next Phase | Benzinga.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Adopting IPv6 is a Corporate Business Issue

Adopting IPv6 is a Corporate Business Issue | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Along with many groups Internet pioneer Vint Cerf has persistently warned of the imminent exhaustion of IPv4 Internet addresses (see clips from 2010, 2011 and 2012), to largely frustrating effect. The time for warnings is over.

 

"IPv6 adoption is currently perceived as all cost and no value. So organisations are maximising the remaining elbow room in the current IPv4 environment, by, for example, squeezing more out of Network Address Translation (NAT) which allows a network to use minimal addresses, or by renumbering redundant addresses, or by other means such as deploying private networks.

And when it comes to the Internet of Things there is a chorus from some technical but influential people in organisations actively urging restraint on IPv6 adoption.They see IPv6 as a Layer 3 network issue, not an Internet of Things issue. One argument is that IPv6 is just one element towards interoperability in an Internet of Things environment and not the be-all and end-all.  It  points to inherent dangers in equating IPv6 with getting value from the Internet of Things saying, for example, that the thousands of sensor devices around a hub don't necessarily need IPv6. It is only the hub itself that does."


-- Dr John Riley

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Cyborg Lives
Scoop.it!

Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices

Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices | Web of Things | Scoop.it

LAST week, under my car’s dashboard, I installed a small wireless gadget that would monitor my driving. I wanted to see how it felt to have my driving behavior captured, sent to an insurance company and analyzed. More drivers, seeking discounts on auto insurance, are voluntarily doing just that.Insurers are offering these discounts as they aim to abandon the crude proxies they have long used to guess the likelihood that a particular policyholder will have an accident. These have included age, sex, marital status, miles driven (as reported by the driver) — and even credit scores, which can penalize those guilty of driving while poor.


Driving data is collected with a device that policyholders must be persuaded to install; it connects to the car’s computer system via a diagnostic port found in all cars since 1996. Such “user-based insurance,” the name for individualized pricing based on data collected from a vehicle, is spreading. Drivewise from Allstate is in 10 states; Drive Safe and Save, from State Farm, is in 16, with 11 more to be added next month; and Snapshot, from Progressive, is in 43.


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Futuristic startup super charges your possessions into digital life

Futuristic startup super charges your possessions into digital life | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Evrythng takes us a step closer towards the Internet of Things.


Rebecca Grant from venturebeat interviews Evrythng founder Niall Murphy.  He is quoted:


“The concept of the Internet of Things has been around of a long time, but only now are the conditions interesting for it to become real. There was no infrastructure on the net for things to have a digital identity. Now with smart phones and other innovations in technology, we can give every single thing a web presence.”


“Our vision is that everything is connected to make the world smarter and more efficient,” Murphy said. “Maybe we are staring at the sky, but why not? I love the idea of the physical world and the digital world seamlessly co-existing. There are endless opportunities.”


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Things: A Boom for Hosting » Data Center Knowledge

The Internet of Things: A Boom for Hosting » Data Center Knowledge | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The “Internet of Things” will transform the hosting and data center industries, generating a tidal wave of data that will prompt companies to enlist third-party providers to help them manage it, according to analyst Rachel Chalmers.


An ‘Inflection Point’ Ahead

Even greater opportunities lie ahead, said Chalmers, driven by the proliferation of Internet-enabled devices, known as the Internet of Things.


“There’s an inflection point coming that will dramatically raise the stakes and rewards,” said Chalmers. “Every single (enterprise) is in the process of redefining themselves as an information company. We believe hosting and managed services providers stand to be the main beneficiaries of this trend.”


The trend has begin in earnest with smartphones, but will accelerate as more devices and sensors become web-enabled and share data to help companies understand consumer behavior and business trends.


Mobile as a Precursor Market

“The Internet of mobile devices is already here,” said Chalmers. “There is a far bigger constellation of end points on the horizon. The numbers are poised to explode. We deeply believe that mobile is a precursor market for the Internet of things.”


The volume of data generated by all those devices will test the existing infrastructure for many enterprises, Chalmers said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Futurist's Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things

Futurist's Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"There are so many ways that an Internet of Things could impact people’s lives that it is hard to describe everything. Distilling it to a few key areas helps define what the scope of an Internet of Things could be: infrastructure (buildings and utilities), consumer (cars and homes), health care and businesses (consumer products and retail locations).

 

Weather-related sensors could help agriculture by monitoring the moisture in the air or ground and give farmer’s warning about droughts. Smart buildings can provide enhanced security for the people that enter them or warning on disasters such as earthquakes. Connected cars can improve traffic flows or allow functions to be controlled remotely. Items within the home (such as the toaster) can be controlled and monitored and even connected to each other.

 

Health care is an interesting avenue for the Internet of Things. Certain aspects of the body could be connected to the Internet. Heart sensors could give patients and doctors data to prevent disease. Sensors that monitor white blood cells could give cancer or AIDS patients warning of a relapse.

 

The scope and impact of the Internet of Things is almost limitless. It is just up to the innovators of the world to be creative and find ways to make it work." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

How the Internet of Things could change Australian homes and businesses

Many of the barriers to adopting the Internet of Things in the home revolve around design issues. For example, Williams says a substantial amount of intelligence is required to enable alerts to be sent when the user wants to receive them – not when the events actually occur. (...)

 

The Internet of Things not only has potential in the home, but businesses could also benefit from it to find out what is happening in real time. For example, it could be used to track the exact location of parcels or drivers. (...)

 

Google has already made a move into this area, with the release in June this year of Google Maps Coordinate which allows businesses to track exactly where employees are located through Google Maps. (...)

 

There are numerous issues around privacy and security. For example, allowing a fridge to connect to the internet could create potential holes for hackers to get into personal networks. How readily consumers will accept these potential invasions of privacy remain to be seen, Williams says, but a tightening of online security will help.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Tempo wants to be the database at the center of the Internet of things

Tempo wants to be the database at the center of the Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Once we connect 50 billion devices to the web by 2020, what will those devices talk to? Chicago Startup Tempo hopes those sensors will take to its database as a service — depositing their tiny bits of time series data inside its custom database.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns

can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Things are getting a “voice,” says Ric Asselstine, chief executive officer of Terepac Corp., a Waterloo company that makes tiny electronics to put into objects to make them “smart” and compatible with the Internet of Things.

 

“At the end of the day, what we’re creating is information,” Asselstine said in a phone interview from Terepac’s headquarters on Colby Drive.

 

There is the potential for “trillions” of devices to be connected to the Internet of Things, he said, noting all of the objects in his office alone.

 

“The potential is literally boundless.”

 

Consumer products, medical devices and agricultural methods, such as managing crop moisture with sensors, can be a part of the Internet of Things.

 

Data about locations and conditions can be transmitted through these objects, Asselstine said.

 

[...]

 

ABI Research analyst Sam Lucero said privacy is already an issue.

 

“We’re already seeing tremendous privacy concerns around, for instance, smart meter data,” said Lucero, practice director of machine-to-machine connectivity for the New York-based tech trends firm.

 

“How is the owner of those devices and that data assured that the data is being used in agreed upon ways and that security is assured?”

 

This is going to be multiplied as different applications and devices become interconnected, he said.

 

TheRecord.com by LuAnn LaSalle

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Photos from the frontier: The Internet of Things

Photos from the frontier: The Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The devices are appearing where once no semiconductors were found, in everything from hydraulic pumps to wristwatches, board games and bandages. Indeed the apps frontier is almost comically diverse.

 

In a keynote at the Mobile World Congress earlier this year Ralph de la Vega, chief executive of AT&T, talked about wireless sensor networks measuring both the moisture content of farm fields to automate irrigation systems and the fullness of dumpsters to calculate the most efficient routes for garbage trucks.

 

“If you think about our future think trash, think dirt—there’s money there,” he quipped.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

A 'Facebook of things' could give appliances their own social presence (Wired UK)

A 'Facebook of things' could give appliances their own social presence (Wired UK) | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The internet of things will allow the products we buy to act as social objects with their own virtual Facebook profile equivalent, around which new experiences can cluster, according to Andy Hobsbawm, founder of Evrythng.

 

He talked about Toyota Friend -- a private social network that connects the driver with its car -- which texts you when it needs its batteries recharged. "This creates a direct digital connection between the physical object and the person who owns and uses it," he said.

 

Hobsbawm went on to propose the idea of a digitally-connected guitar. Currently, when a musician buys a guitar from a shop there is barely any relationship between the manufacturer and the buyer. Gibson won't even know who has bought the guitars it ships to its retailers.

 

"Customer relationship management systems are fairly crude. If there was a world where products had digital identities, marketers would understand much more about how the product would be used," he explained. This would allow the company to deliver more relevant, useful tools and services to its customers: "If Gibson knows I'm starting to learn slide guitar, it might suggest a certain type of string or a new model of steel guitar I might want to try out."

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Shaping supply chain sustainability with the Internet of things

Shaping supply chain sustainability with the Internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

To hear Gavin Starks tell it, the premise for the AMEE platform grew from several simple -- but vastly ambitious -- questions.

 

The first, recalled the founder and chair of the firm, was: "How might we footprint everything on earth?"

 

...

 

"From my perspective," Starks said, "the Internet of Things is a technology looking for purpose, and to me sustainability is a purpose." Toward that end, he said, AMEE hopes to be a "catalyzer for change by providing a better set of tools."

 

By Leslie Guevarra - GreenBiz.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Windows8 Embedded Helps make the Internet of Things Possible

Windows8 Embedded Helps make the Internet of Things Possible | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Windows8 Embedded Helps make the Internet of Things Possible...

 

"This idea of cheap and plentiful network-connected embedded devices has been called the “Internet of things,” meaning the system that does online detection of offline objects and their physical properties. Although it has been predicted for many years, such an Internet of things may actually take hold now in part due to cloud computing services like Microsoft Azure.

 

So for instance, owners of vending machines, could benefit by embedding the machines with processors and connecting them to a network. A small system embedded inside a machine can keep a tally of which snacks or other items are being sold. With Windows8, the system would be able to provide other information that could keep a vibrant inventory, increase sales. and get a running tally of all the snacks being sold across all the machines."

more...
No comment yet.