Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Can We Trust Real-Time, Collective Intelligence to Live a Better Life?

Can We Trust Real-Time, Collective Intelligence to Live a Better Life? | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Networked objects are learning to anticipate our needs and orchestrate responses that deliver safety, efficiency, and convenience.

. . .

Jen: This anticipatory alarm received information from the cloud regarding weather and traffic, but also from the car itself. The car could also push a message to the cloud that its gas level was low. The system would then anticipate that the driver might have to stop for gas and add that to the expected commute time.

. . . 

Tim: The vast majority of trips that we take in vehicles tend to be trips we’ve made before, but having that information, creating a profile or history in order to derive conclusions about what someone might be doing on a Tuesday at 5:30, provides useful information. If it’s aggregated and people opt in, that can beneficially impact the traffic load balancing. It could help create an efficient use of infrastructure and help the overall impact of transportation as it plays out.

. . .

Jennifer Healey, research scientist at Intel, and Tim Plowman, embedded user experience lead with Intel Labs’ Experience Design team.

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Why the internet of things needs 'curated openness'

Why the internet of things needs 'curated openness' | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The internet of things is for real, even if it's nowhere near the nirvana of devices that speak with each other and take care of our every waking need automatically.


Speaking Friday at our Mobilize conference in San Francisco, Research in Motion Senior Vice President of BlackBerry OS and QNX Engineering Sebastian Marineau-Mes told the audience that although ubiqutious computing is many people’s ultimate dream in a wireless world, it’s not going to happen without standards that don’t yet exist. Although he painted a beautiful picture of his phone telling his car about a doctor appointment, leading to a chain of automation that included navigation, prescription-filling and his house’s air conditioner kicking on at just the right time as he finally made his way back home, “The big barrier to really achieving this level of integration,” Marineau-Mes said “… is really the interoperability of all these types of data sources.”


And to all the Apple and Android diehards out there, Marineau-Mes said that neither of those platforms are the answer. iOS is too closed, he explained, while Android is so open it tends to create silos of developers who just go off and do their own thing. The answer is something he calls “curated openness” — essentially the standardization of a few core functions to ensure that data can move freely between apps and that apps can move freely across our devices, whether those are phones, tablets, refrigerators or cars.

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Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Services from healthcare to energy will change over the next decade as machine-to-machine communication facilitates more sophisticated automation.

 

The shift will be led by a combination of improved network communication, smaller and lower cost embedded devices and the development of common standards.

 

However, privacy, security and the risk of network congestion will need to be overcome, while technology standards and streamlined regulations are also a prerequisite.

 

These claims are made in a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), entitled Rise of the Machines

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Qualcomm Atheros joins Internet of Things with tiny comms chip

Qualcomm Atheros joins Internet of Things with tiny comms chip | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Qualcomm Atheros has jumped onto the Internet of Things bandwagon with a new chipset, the AR4100P, intended to give your washing machine, lighting and just about anything else a direct line to the web.

 

Qualcomm Atheros calls its line-up of products for the segment its “Internet of Everything portfolio” and expects it to find buyers among smart energy providers, those creating products for the “intelligent home”, in security and building automation, for remote health and wellness monitoring, and more.

 

via SlashGear

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How Evrythng could give any physical object a life online

How Evrythng could give any physical object a life online | Web of Things | Scoop.it
What will you be able to do with it?

 

Via their online presences, Evrythng-enabled objects will be able to have all sorts of data associated with them, whether entered manually or updated automatically via sensors attached to the objects themselves.

 

Examples? As Evrythng’s own site suggests:

 

“Your Nikon D90 might, with your permission, suggest times and place to get the best photos: “19th November looks like a clear night with a full moon– go to the foot of Tate Britain at 7.15 for the perfect night shot of St. Paul’s Cathedral…

 

“Perhaps your sunburst Gibson Custom ES-330L (not just that type of guitar, but yours specifically) could let you specify the band you’d like to form and then connect you with other musicians near you who are at the same level of ability and play the other instruments in that band’s line-up.

 

“This data could also integrate with 3rd party apps – like a special deal with a bus company to do a tour of Devon for a group of Muse fans with Manson guitars like Matt Bellamy.”

 

http://evrythng.com/

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ShelfX Unveils Store Shelves for Automating Purchases

ShelfX Unveils Store Shelves for Automating Purchases | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The system, slated for supermarket pilots, will weigh products, determine what has been removed, and automatically charge a customer based on that person's RFID-enabled loyalty card or wristband.

 

photo is of Ran Margalit, ShelfX's founder and CEO

via RFID Journal 

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The Internet of Things and the future of manufacturing | McKinsey & Company

The Internet of Things and the future of manufacturing | McKinsey & Company | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Executives at Robert Bosch and McKinsey experts discuss the technology-driven changes that promise to trigger a new industrial revolution. A McKinsey & Company article.

 

In manufacturing, the potential for cyber-physical systems to improve productivity in the production process and the supply chain is vast. Consider processes that govern themselves, where smart products can take corrective action to avoid damages and where individual parts are automatically replenished. Such technologies already exist and could drive what some German industry leaders call the fourth industrial revolution—following the steam engine, the conveyor belt, and the first phase of IT and automation technology. What opportunities and challenges lie ahead for manufacturers—and what will it take to win? To discuss the future of manufacturing, McKinsey’s Markus Löffler and Andreas Tschiesner recently sat down for a conversation with Siegfried Dais, deputy chairman of the board of management at German engineering company Robert Bosch GmbH, and Heinz Derenbach, CEO of Bosch Software Innovations GmbH.


Via Fred Zimny, Pierre Levy
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When it comes to the connected home, it's keep it simple, stupid

When it comes to the connected home, it's keep it simple, stupid | Web of Things | Scoop.it

As more people install smart NEST thermostats and use iPads to interact with their TVs, the stage is set for massive adoption of the completely connected home, right? Well, maybe.


Some big issues have to be sorted out before that will happen. For one thing, there is a Tower of Babel of standards for communicating between various devices made by different vendors to serve different purposes. That has to come together first, according to speakers at GigaOM’s Mobilize conference on Friday.


There are cool home automation devices coming out of Kickstarter as well as from consumer electronic giants. That variety is great except for the fact that if these things can’t talk to each other, they really aren’t connected at all.

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Photos from the frontier: The Internet of Things

Photos from the frontier: The Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The devices are appearing where once no semiconductors were found, in everything from hydraulic pumps to wristwatches, board games and bandages. Indeed the apps frontier is almost comically diverse.

 

In a keynote at the Mobile World Congress earlier this year Ralph de la Vega, chief executive of AT&T, talked about wireless sensor networks measuring both the moisture content of farm fields to automate irrigation systems and the fullness of dumpsters to calculate the most efficient routes for garbage trucks.

 

“If you think about our future think trash, think dirt—there’s money there,” he quipped.

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Machines may say: move over doctor

M2M uses a device (a surface or implanted sensor) to capture an event (e.g., BP, blood sugar, ECG) which is relayed to an application (software programme) that translates the captured event into meaningful information. This information is then analysed by an Artificial Intelligent System (AIS) reviewed by a physician and instructions for corrective measures (e.g., release of appropriate insulin from implanted pump) are sent.

 

The H2M interaction is possible today without a mouse, keyboard or touch screen. Gesture-based computing (MicrosoftKinect) is already being used by physically challenged patients. Unique virtual reality activities and simulated tasks using gestures are more exciting than traditional physiotherapy regimes. At present, an automatic blood analyser gives a printout of various tests on scores of patients. It is possible to instruct the analyser to directly send abnormal results through SMS to the primary consultant, an e.g. of M2H (machine to human) interaction. In “the Brave New World” these results can be sent automatically along with clinical data to an AIS which, in turn, would recommend appropriate action with a cc to a human.

 

Surface or embedded devices can send details of calorie consumption or sleep patterns to help consumers tailor their habits. A medical alert pendant can, in the case of patient incapacity due to a fall, pacemaker failure, etc, automatically inform a response centre from where a PC with AI (artificial intelligence) will contact the nearest ambulance.

 

via The Hindu : Opinion

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Cerf on science: The father of the Internet talks string theory, the physics of Angry Birds & more

Cerf on science: The father of the Internet talks string theory, the physics of Angry Birds & more | Web of Things | Scoop.it

When Vint Cerf talks about Google's upcoming global Science Fair, you can hear the infectious enthusiasm in his voice.

Again, Cerf sees some aspects of that fictional world becoming reality, especially with regard to the Internet of Things. “The Android OS is turning out to be of interest… in other devices, things that consume electricity, appliances around the house,” he said.

 

And of course, there’s Google’s revolutionary self-driving cars.

 

“We’re very proud of those cars,” said Cerf. “This is turning out to be an incredible period of time when we’re able to harness the power of computing in small devices and also harnessing huge computing power in the form of clouds.”

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