Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia

Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia | Web of Things | Scoop.it
PrimeSense, which developed the 3D sensing technology used in Microsoft’s Kinect, is set to unveil a compact 3D sensor that can fit into a variety of consumer electronic devices.

The Capri 1.25 embedded 3D sensor is around one-tenth the size of PrimeSense’s current generation of 3D sensors, the Israeli company said Tuesday in a press release. Capri has improved 3D sensing algorithms, it said.

Apple’s control through patents over many elements of touch-based user interfaces discourages competitors from innovating in this area, Malik Saadi, principal analyst with Informa Telecoms & Media, said Wednesday. Many vendors are looking into alternatives, like touch-free gesture recognition that can be facilitated by 3D sensors, he said.

Samsung is looking at gesture recognition and will probably be deploying it next year or soon after, Saadi said.

Voice and gesture recognition are key to the future of smartphones, Saadi said. The combination of touch with voice and gesture recognition will very likely lead to a superior user experience and innovative application development, he said.

- Macworld Australia
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Apple Is Quietly Working To Destroy The iPhone

Apple Is Quietly Working To Destroy The iPhone | Web of Things | Scoop.it

During Business Insider's Ignition Conference last week, top Apple analyst Gene Munster of Piper Jaffray talked about Apple's tendency to cannibalize its own businesses and predicted that it would continue to do so.


He speculated that Apple is working on consumer robotics, wearable computers, 3D printing, consumable computers, and automated technology. (...)


Here's the other reason it's safe to assume Apple is quietly working on the destruction of its most massive business, the iPhone.
Just like Google and Microsoft, Apple is working on computerized glasses.


Computerized glasses, are, at the moment, the technology that is most likely to bring the smartphone era to an end.


They fit into an obvious pattern, where computers have been getting smaller and closer to our faces since their very beginning. (...)


In the patent filing, Apple calls the gadget a "head-mounted display" or "HMD."


Nicholas Carson

03 Dec 2012

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Apple files patent for Google Glass competitor

Apple files patent for Google Glass competitor | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Apple's 2009 patent involves "movie glasses" that would be used to view content streamed from an iPod or other media device.


But over time (and no doubt influenced by Google's Project Glass) the movie glasses have evolved into the current filing for a headset that places a retina-quality heads-up display over one eye.
However, the helmet is still a mystery.

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Senseye - Eye control for mobile devices

"You thought Siri’s voice interface for the iPhone 4S was pretty slick? Wait until you see what the people behind Copenhagen-based project Senseye have planned – controlling your phone with your eyes." via thenextweb.com - http://goo.gl/IIil8

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Revolutionary evolution: The Internet of things and things to come

The digital world is evolution, per se — continuous, rapid, radical, and, by now, so pervasive that it is the Internet which is driving human evolution. It is the Internet which makes possible the future envisioned by genomics researcher Juan Enriquez, one where we choose what and who we are. It is the Internet which allows Intel Fellow Mark Bohr to foresee that "in the future, chips may become integrated directly with the brain, combining AI/human intelligence and dramatically enhancing our cognitive and learning abilities. ... lead[ing] to a "technological singularity" — a point in time when machine intelligence is evolving so rapidly that humans are left far, far behind." Is not the coming of the Internet a "butterfly effect," a change so profound that the world we know today simply disappears? (...)


Revolutionary evolution is the future — a series of paradigm shifts with unpredictable yet profound effects. Precisely because we are building upon an interconnected foundation of complex technologies, any small change may be extremely amplified. That Apple app store (cloud service) offers 650,000 applications, has 400,000,000 credit card numbers on file, and has engaged in 30,000,000,000 transactions. In dollar terms, that is $7 billion in revenue for app developers most of whom can be called "cottage industry." With respect to software development, this is revolutionary evolution. (...)


But even without directly implanted transducers of the sort described by Bohr, every nuanced movement or change in your orbit can be measured analyzed and correlated. So while there may be a temporary fear of direct transducer implants, your physical condition, actions and even intentions can be indirectly inferred from mega-sampling large number of interconnected transducers providing exactly the same result as an implanted transducer. (...)


Are you in control or entitled to be aware of the apps and transducers in your orbit? Would your apps or transducers have some sort of inferred or legal rights preventing you from turning them off or excluding certain ones? Is security merely a euphemism for control, and if so by whom? Is security evolving into an organic model perhaps one where your transducers have a kind of antibody that roams within your orbit identifying and destroying perceived malicious intruders, and if so what about the impact of false positives? Is everything we understand about security about to be obliterated? For that matter, is the meaning of "self" up for grabs?




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Future iPads to Implement Vicinity Sensors for Enterprise Use - Patently Apple

Future iPads to Implement Vicinity Sensors for Enterprise Use - Patently Apple | Web of Things | Scoop.it
On June 30, 2011, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals various new advanced vicinity sensors coming to future iPads.


New vicinity sensors coming to the iPad include RFID, Infrared and Ultrasonic. The latter utilizes advanced 3D scanning and imaging capablilities. The advanced sensors are designed to locate office equipment anywhere within an enterprise and could actually devise floor plans to properly located devices. Users will also be able to drag document icons to the printer or videos and/or art to a video projector for a presentation using Keynote or Power Point. Without a doubt, Apple is aiming to further advance the iPad into the enterprise. (...)


For example, one or more of an indoor GPS, a Bluetooth antenna, a radio frequency identification (RFID) device, an ultrasonic device, an infrared device, and so forth, may be used to determine if apparatuses are in the vicinity. In some embodiments, the same technology used to find devices in the vicinity of the electronic device may be used to determine the identification of the device. For example, RFID may be used to determine the presence of a particular device and the device's identifying information. In other embodiments, a first technology may be used to determine if apparatuses are in the vicinity of the electronic device and a second technology may be used to obtain identifying information. More information on this is presented below under "Indoor Global Positioning Scheme."



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Who Will Control the Internet of Things?

"Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL ) filed a patent at the tail end of 2009 dubbed "Local Device Awareness," which describes automated connections between a number of close-range devices. Some potential applications could be device position targeting (think locating your keys) or proximity-based gaming."

 

"If Apple's patent seems overly broad, patent hoarder InterDigital (Nasdaq: IDCC ) has gone for specificity. It holds some 33 known patents covering machine-to-machine communication." 

 

"Motorola and Google seem to be behind in patents, with only one highly technical machine-to-machine patent showing up for Motorola Mobility, and none for Google. But as you'll soon see, the two companies might be hoping for a more open environment."

 

"IBM sees the Internet of things as a source of growth, and it recognizes that the best way to capitalize is to make it easy to adopt. Keeping the underlying framework open-source will undoubtedly improve competition and encourage startups, much as the growth of the public Internet led to an explosion of newly public companies. Let's hope that the growth of this new industry isn't hampered by patents, but we should also be wary of any new bubbles that might inflate."

 

via The Motley Fool

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Could Siri be the invisible interface of the future?

Could Siri be the invisible interface of the future? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

This article points to how Siri, the "intelligent assistant" app on Apple's iPhone 4S, could act as an "invisible interface" for the "Internet of Things".  Use your voice to interact with things, like your smart home.  A voice command like: “close the windows and turn on the air conditioning if the outside temperature rises above 85 degrees,” could be a real-world example in just a few years time, according to GigaOm writer Kevin C. Tofel.  He's convinced that "the Siri of today is just touching the tip of the iceberg for such a future."

 

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