Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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A Startup Envisions a Low-Power, Long-Range Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review

A Startup Envisions a Low-Power, Long-Range Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Iotera expects businesses to use its technology to track everything from tools on construction sites to workers in dangerous places like oil rigs. Or people might use it to keep an eye on their pets. Iotera’s founders say two companies (which it won’t name) are trying it out. One is using it to help parents monitor their children’s whereabouts, and the other is tracking company-owned devices.

 

[idea cofounder Ben Wild] handed me a sensor tag in a 3-D-printed case about the size of a small matchbox. If you clipped one to your dog’s collar, it would occasionally log Fido’s location and report it back to a small access point connected to the Internet. From there, it would be punted to Iotera’s servers, and then to a website or mobile app. Under what Wild calls “typical operating conditions,” the tag’s battery would last up to five months.

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Fill 'Er Up! Coffee Mugs Get Connected with RFID

Fill 'Er Up! Coffee Mugs Get Connected with RFID | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A company called Smug Coffee has created what it says is the world's first smart mug, or "smug." Instead of opting for wasteful plastic cups, coffee drinkers can instead buy a special mug with embedded radio frequency identification (RFID) chips that store account information and purchase habits.

 

http://www.smugcoffee.com/

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The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Web of Things | Scoop.it

China, Japan and the European Union all invest about €1 billion a year in the Internet of Things; it is not known how much the US spends but the country also tags, scans and monitors goods and services. "The question of whether this is a desirable development or not is no longer relevant, the technology is there and we're using it," says IT specialist Arjan Geurts of Twynstra Gudde Advice Bureau.

 

The technical problems have been solved; an RFID or Radio Frequency Identification tag costs just five cents and wireless internet is in the ascendancy. The amount of information being sent is relatively small, which means there is very little chance of overloading the internet connection. Geurts: "the advent of the smartphone is the motor driving technological developments."

 

...

 

Asia is in the vanguard when it comes to the Internet of Things. Van 't Hof: "Chinese and Japanese users have integrated the technology very harmoniously. When China introduced electronic licence plates in order to monitor and regulate traffic, the authorities feared it would lead to riots as the technology could be used to restrict freedom of movement. However, there were no protests once the advantages of the system were explained and assurances about data accumulation were given. Transparency was the key."

 

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The privacy issues don't worry companies very much, but security is very much an issue. Jaap-Henk Hoepman, a computer security and privacy expert attached to Radboud University in Nijmegen, says, "If something goes wrong, the damage is enormous. A company could be stuck with an entire shipment of perishable goods if the tracking system goes down or could be hit by digital industrial espionage."

 

"But that's no reason not to go ahead. We have to be aware of the risks. About 90 percent of the applications for this technology haven't even been thought of yet. And there will certainly be ways to use the technology that will make us wonder how we ever survived without them."

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Dual RFID-ZigBee sensors to enable NFC applications for the Internet of Things | ECN: Electronic Component News

Zaragoza, Spain-based Libelium has launched a new RFID/NFC module for its Waspmote sensor platform. The new radio module extends Waspmote features allowing the sensor data to be used in Location Based Services (LBS), such as asset tracking, supply chain monitoring, intelligent shopping or access management.

 

By using RFID/NFC (passive sensors) along with ZigBee (active sensors), Libelium says asset tracking can be more accurate than ever along the whole supply chain process. Product management software such as ERPs will have access in real time to information related to remaining stock, storage and transportation conditions (temperature and humidity levels, vibrations, light exposure, etc), expiration dates and even consumer profiles, knowing time spent in front of a shelf or products picked up and not bought.

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IBM's "new" Internet: full of toasters, earrings & electronic T-shirts

IBM's "new" Internet: full of toasters, earrings & electronic T-shirts | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Embedded software application development could be a significantly increasing trend for 2012 and onward if IBM's latest thinking is borne out in tangible product development.

 

This is the upshot of IBM's latest moves to produce what could effectively be a whole new Internet - or the "Internet of Things" as it is known. One made up of data and intercommunication exchanges between digitally empowered devices from fridges and toasters to cars, electronically intelligent sports clothing and plant pots.

 

via CWDN

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ShelfX Unveils Store Shelves for Automating Purchases

ShelfX Unveils Store Shelves for Automating Purchases | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The system, slated for supermarket pilots, will weigh products, determine what has been removed, and automatically charge a customer based on that person's RFID-enabled loyalty card or wristband.

 

photo is of Ran Margalit, ShelfX's founder and CEO

via RFID Journal 

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The Growing Hipness of Mobile Wellness

The Growing Hipness of Mobile Wellness | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Your mobile wireless carrier may soon have a say in the way you think about health and wellness. AT&T, through its Emerging Devices unit, plans to offer for sale health-tracking clothing equipped with wireless sensors that enable you to track your heart rate, body temperature and other vital signs -- and then send all this data to a site where a physician can access it. The first offering will be a version of the E39 body compression shirt, originally designed by Under Armour for the NFL scouting combines and other world-class athletic competitions. Now imagine yourself as a high-performance weekend athlete, effortlessly transmitting your heart rate, skin temperature and activity levels to the Web"

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The Internet of Things – this is where we're going

The Internet of Things – this is where we're going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet: What are we connecting?
"The Internet of Things is not just about devices that are directly connected to the internet. Sensors and identifiers such as RFID (radio frequency identification) tags also provide data through an intermediary such as a mobile phone, RFID reader, or internet-connected base station.

 

This means an RFID-tagged cereal box may be considered as one of the “things” on the internet. Theoretically, the RFID would have been used in conjunction with other sensors to record the full life-history of that particular box of cereal, from the time it was manufactured to how it was transported and how long it took for it to be empty."

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IoT Interview: Rick Bullotta of Thingworx

IoT Interview: Rick Bullotta of Thingworx | Web of Things | Scoop.it

How do you view the term “Internet of Things”?

 

Interesting question. I personally think the term is one of those memes that, if you ask 100 people what it means, you’ll get 104 answers. I consider it somewhat “damaged” as a result of the original RFID-centric definition of a few years ago, so I’d love to see that cord being cut once and for all. I also don’t really see the analogy to the “internet” being accurate. The “internet” was the plumbing, but the “web” was really brought the value. So I’m partially biased towards Dom Guinard and Vlad Trifa’s “web of things” term. Also, the reality today is that a significant number of the devices that will be connected in the near term (energy, manufacturing, water, transportation, healthcare, and remote service management) will be connected via private networks. I call that the “Intranets of Things”. There are literally millions of these networks, and there is amazing value to be unlocked not only *within* those networks but at the interstititials/boundaries between those networks. I’m a passionate believer in the power of the network effect – Metcalfe’s law.

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RFID – The saviour of retail?

RFID – The saviour of retail? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

An innovative idea from the Burberry flagship store in London:


"Clothing is fitted with chips which are automatically recognised by screens and mirrors using radio-frequency identification technology. So, when a customer walks into a changing room, carrying a dress, the mirrors respond by showing images of how it was worn on the catwalk, or details of how it was made. This reflects the way that items are displayed online, with suggestions of similar products, or accessories to match… it’s this kind of attention to detail – going above and beyond that give the customer satisfaction, that really is the bricks and mortar of retail."


by Sally Ellis |  Unit4 UK & Ireland Blog

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Waiting for the Internet of Things – DC Velocity

More than a decade ago, radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology pioneer Kevin Ashton coined the term "Internet of Things." The idea was that every item, product, or "thing" would have a unique identifier just as every computer does on the Internet. RF tags, of course, would provide the means by which these things could be tracked and identified.

 

For logistics managers, the Internet of Things would be a game changer. Among other benefits, it would make it possible to track the flow of goods into and out of a warehouse at the item level. Some retailers and consumer packaged goods manufacturers are already experimenting with item-level tracking. Nonetheless, it appears that the ability to track everything is still several years away.

 

Why? A recent report from Frost & Sullivan ("Analysis of the Active RFID and Sensor Networks Market") offers some insight into the barriers to making the Internet of Things a reality. One of the top challenges, it notes, is getting more companies to buy the type of tags necessary to make this possible. (...)

 

As for why users are shying away from active tags, there are a couple of reasons. First, there's the lack of common industry standards. While passive tags use data standards developed by the EPCglobal consortium, there's no such system in place for active tags. At the moment, makers of active tags use different technology protocols, such as Wi-Fi, Rubee, Zigbee, ultra wide band, infrared, and ultrasound. All of those protocols require different standards, hindering widescale adoption of the technology. (...)

 

Although a standard would hasten the adoption of active tags, there's still another obstacle—cost. Bhattacharya says a passive basic tag goes for $2 to $5 per unit,while an active tag costs between $10 and $15. And that's the low end of the range. If those tags are embedded with sensors and support multiple technologies, the cost of an active tag can top $100 per unit.

 

 

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Commission consults on rules for the ‘Internet of Things’

Realising the enormous economic and societal potential of the IoT requires a level playing field where all players can compete on an equal footing, without gate keepers and locked-in users.

 

Its societal acceptance requires the definition of an ethical and legal framework, supported by technology and providing people with control and security.

 

Through the consultation, the Commission is seeking views on privacy, safety and security, security of critical IoT supported infrastructure, ethics, interoperability, governance and standards.

 

The Internet of today offers access to content and information through connection to web pages from multiple terminals like PCs, smart phones or TVs.

 

The next evolution will make it possible to access information related to the physical environment through connected objects capable of sensing the environment and communicating through smart chips using Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) with or without human intervention.

 

by Enterprise Europe Network

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Electronic tagging system could replace barcodes

Electronic tagging system could replace barcodes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A team from Imec’s Holst Center in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, has developed a high-performance radio frequency identification (RFID) tag that could be cheaply mass-produced and prevents data transfer from being interrupted.

 

The researchers believe their technology could be crucial to the development of cheap, high-performance RFID.

 

‘Item-level tagging could allow vendors to implement automatic billing and inventory management,’ Kris Myny, an organic circuitry researcher at Imec, told The Engineer.

 

‘On top of these applications, such RFID tags could be integrated with sensors for smart RFID tags. In this way, they could be integrated into food packaging to provide customers with information on freshness or characteristics of this product.’

 

via The Engineer

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Goggleless augmented reality

Goggleless augmented reality | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"The Mitsubishi Electric Research Lab (MERL) has combined RFID, photo sensors and portable projectors to make a goggle free augmented reality system. Ok, this time in plain english... it's a flash light that shows you information about whatever the light is shining on. Currently being demonstrated at SIGGRAPH 2004, it's intended use is for inventory tracking, but the possibilities are pretty far reaching."

 

via RFIDbuzz.com

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Lord & Taylor Tags Shoes, Boosts Sales

Lord & Taylor Tags Shoes, Boosts Sales | Web of Things | Scoop.it
By attaching EPC Gen 2 RFID tags to shoes displayed on its sales floor, the retailer can ensure that customers can see every shoe style it sells.

 

via RFID Journal

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F22 - Internet of Things | ITU World 2011

F22 - Internet of Things | ITU World 2011 | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"The Internet of Things will enable forms of collaboration and communication between people and things, and between objects (e.g, M2M), hitherto unknown and unimagined. With the benefit of integrated information processing capacity, industrial products will take on smart capabilities. They may also take on electronic identities (e.g. RFID) that can be queried remotely, or be equipped with sensors for detecting physical changes around them. Such developments will turn the static objects of today into dynamic objects - embedding intelligence in our environment and stimulating the creation of innovative products and new business opportunities. Without a doubt, the development of the Internet of Things also poses challenges to policy-makers and regulators. Are radically new approaches necessary to answer these challenges? What new business models will emerge? These and other questions will be addressed in this expert panel to help us anticipate and plan for how to prepare for these impending shifts."

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Printable transistors usher in 'internet of things'

Printable transistors usher in 'internet of things' | Web of Things | Scoop.it

snippet:

"Thinfilm, a Norwegian developer of printable memory, has co-announced with California's Xerox PARC a development that takes a big step towards the day when every manufactured object will report in to the internet.

 

Yes, the "internet of things" – the buzzword of the decade.

 

Thinfilm and PARC's breakthrough is a technology that can print not only memory onto, well, thin films, but can now also print transistors to address and manage that memory."

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The Internet of Things by Rob van Kranenburg

The Internet of Things by Rob van Kranenburg | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things is a critique of ambient technology and the all-seeing network of RFID by Rob van Kranenburg. Rob examines what impact RFID and other systems, will have on our cities and our wider society. He tells of his early encounters with the kind of location-based technologies that will soon become commonplace, and what they may mean for us all. He explores the emergence of the “internet of things”, tracing us through its origins in the mundane back-end world of the international supply chain to the domestic applications that already exist in an embryonic stage. He also explains how the adoption of the technologies of the City Control is not inevitable, nor something that we must kindly accept nor sleepwalk into. In van Kranenburg’s account of the creation of the international network of Bricolabs, he also suggests how each of us can help contribute to building technologies of trust and empower ourselves in the age of mass surveillance and ambient technologies.

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