Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Ant-Sized Radios to Connect the World

Ant-Sized Radios to Connect the World | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new radio-chip device could offer a cost effective solution to the capital-intensive hurdles preventing the proliferation of the Internet of Things.

 

Engineers at Stanford University have developed what’s been described as an “ant-sized radio” that could allow two-way communication between any electronic device. Capable of operating at 24 billion cycles per second the chip, which is one tenth the size of a WiFi antenna, costs only pennies to produce. While being small and inexpensive are certainly boons for this type of device, designers admit that one of its most appealing characteristics is that it needs no external power. In fact, according to Stanford, the new chip is so “energy efficient that it gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna – no batteries required.”

. . . 

Being able to control devices remotely could be key to achieving better personal energy efficiency and changing the way we interact with technology. In the distant future connected devices could also be a training ground for weak AI systems where domestic duties like making coffee and running the dishwasher could be triggered by actions like turning on the shower or dimming the lights for bed.

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Revolutionary evolution: The Internet of things and things to come

The digital world is evolution, per se — continuous, rapid, radical, and, by now, so pervasive that it is the Internet which is driving human evolution. It is the Internet which makes possible the future envisioned by genomics researcher Juan Enriquez, one where we choose what and who we are. It is the Internet which allows Intel Fellow Mark Bohr to foresee that "in the future, chips may become integrated directly with the brain, combining AI/human intelligence and dramatically enhancing our cognitive and learning abilities. ... lead[ing] to a "technological singularity" — a point in time when machine intelligence is evolving so rapidly that humans are left far, far behind." Is not the coming of the Internet a "butterfly effect," a change so profound that the world we know today simply disappears? (...)


Revolutionary evolution is the future — a series of paradigm shifts with unpredictable yet profound effects. Precisely because we are building upon an interconnected foundation of complex technologies, any small change may be extremely amplified. That Apple app store (cloud service) offers 650,000 applications, has 400,000,000 credit card numbers on file, and has engaged in 30,000,000,000 transactions. In dollar terms, that is $7 billion in revenue for app developers most of whom can be called "cottage industry." With respect to software development, this is revolutionary evolution. (...)


But even without directly implanted transducers of the sort described by Bohr, every nuanced movement or change in your orbit can be measured analyzed and correlated. So while there may be a temporary fear of direct transducer implants, your physical condition, actions and even intentions can be indirectly inferred from mega-sampling large number of interconnected transducers providing exactly the same result as an implanted transducer. (...)


Are you in control or entitled to be aware of the apps and transducers in your orbit? Would your apps or transducers have some sort of inferred or legal rights preventing you from turning them off or excluding certain ones? Is security merely a euphemism for control, and if so by whom? Is security evolving into an organic model perhaps one where your transducers have a kind of antibody that roams within your orbit identifying and destroying perceived malicious intruders, and if so what about the impact of false positives? Is everything we understand about security about to be obliterated? For that matter, is the meaning of "self" up for grabs?




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A Rosie Future: Jetsons -Like Gadgets with "Ambient Intelligence" Are Key to Smart Homes and Cities: Scientific American

A Rosie Future: Jetsons -Like Gadgets with "Ambient Intelligence" Are Key to Smart Homes and Cities: Scientific American | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Information collected by AI software from sensors in homes and cities could identify and address health, safety and environmental problems without human intervention...

Via Wildcat2030
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The emergence of a “global brain”

The emergence of a “global brain” | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Yuri Milner is one of the savviest technology thinkers in the world; he was a pioneering investor in Facebook, a bet that was wildly vindicated last week.

 

Milner has a presentation in which he describes the nine most important changes in the world today. Three of them are about what Arthur has dubbed the second economy: the rise of what Milner calls “the Internet of things,” or the machine-to-machine economy; the growing power of artificial intelligence; and the emergence of a “global brain,” which is the network of all of the people and the machines in the world and their connections to one another.

 

Rise of the machines - by Chystina Freeland

Reuters

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Could self-aware cities be the first forms of artificial intelligence?

Could self-aware cities be the first forms of artificial intelligence? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Another node of the coming urban machine mind could come from your devices as well as "smart" devices everywhere else. Urbanscale founder Adam Greenfield has written a lot about ubiquitous computing in urban environments, most notably in 2006's Everyware, which posits that computers will "effectively disappear" as objects around us become "smart" in ways that are nearly invisible to lay-people.

 

In the more recent pamphlet Urban Computing and its Discontents, Greenfield and co-author Mark Shepard argue people's interactions with computers will become "socially integrated and spatially contingent, as everyday objects and spaces are linked through net-worked computing."

 

Greenfield adds,

"It's inconceivable to me that cities of the developed world will not make use of the very extensive array of networked digital devices that will be present and available, whether it's to manage and optimize traffic flows, adjust building envelopes to present conditions, display current conditions of use, or, less happily, present tailored advertising just about anywhere."

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Image via: http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/8/2010/08/321_realsize.jpg

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X-Apple Siri Director is taking artificial intelligence into the cloud for Samsung's AI for the Internet of Things

X-Apple Siri Director is taking artificial intelligence into the cloud for Samsung's AI for the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The former director of Apple's Siri is taking Samsung's version of the artificial intelligence system to the next level. Luc Julia, vice president and innovation fellow at Samsung's Open Innovation Center in Menlo Park, Calif., demonstrated SAMI (Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions), the Siri-like system central to Samsung's Internet of Things (IoT) strategy, at the MEMS Executive Congress 2013 in Napa, Calif., Nov. 7-8. 

SAMI is an interactive artificial intelligence (AI) similar to Apple's Siri that Julia helped develop when at Apple. Samsung's SAMI, however, goes far beyond Apple's Siri by aggregating sensor data from all types and brands of IoT devices in the cloud. The open system will then allow Samsung ecosystem partners -- some financed by a $100 million accelerator fund -- to perform deep analytics on that data before sending smart advice back to users. 

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Belinda Suvaal's curator insight, November 12, 2013 12:57 PM

interessante ontwikkelingen bij Samsung #AI

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What will the future look like?

What will the future look like? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Professor Peter Cochrane, chairman and director of Cochrane Associates, said mankind has become highly dependent on machines to get nearly everything done in the life. Therefore the world is currently challenged by a rising tide of complexity and enclosure of machines used for transportation, weather systems and the gathering of seismic data.

 

Prof Cochrane referred to computers as ‘dumb'. He believes in spite of their capabilities, they still put a large part of the work on their users. Likewise, he said the internet burdens surfers with much effort with the requirement of data input for information research — time that could be invested more wisely in creativity output.


"We need artificial intelligence and machines that bring new levels of creativity. We must have sensors, but not necessary processing power or memory. Sensors have to be entropic in order to make changes using models and building layers of complexity over time," he said. "Laptop computers are dumb as they don't have sensors or adaptability. We are rolling out intelligent sensors, and our future machines will see, hear, smell, detect and communicate."


The future outlined by Prof Cochrane is essentially the ushering in of the age of the internet of things, which refers to uniquely identifiable objects (things) and their virtual representations in an internet-like structure. The term was first used by Kevin Ashton in 1999.

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Machines may say: move over doctor

M2M uses a device (a surface or implanted sensor) to capture an event (e.g., BP, blood sugar, ECG) which is relayed to an application (software programme) that translates the captured event into meaningful information. This information is then analysed by an Artificial Intelligent System (AIS) reviewed by a physician and instructions for corrective measures (e.g., release of appropriate insulin from implanted pump) are sent.

 

The H2M interaction is possible today without a mouse, keyboard or touch screen. Gesture-based computing (MicrosoftKinect) is already being used by physically challenged patients. Unique virtual reality activities and simulated tasks using gestures are more exciting than traditional physiotherapy regimes. At present, an automatic blood analyser gives a printout of various tests on scores of patients. It is possible to instruct the analyser to directly send abnormal results through SMS to the primary consultant, an e.g. of M2H (machine to human) interaction. In “the Brave New World” these results can be sent automatically along with clinical data to an AIS which, in turn, would recommend appropriate action with a cc to a human.

 

Surface or embedded devices can send details of calorie consumption or sleep patterns to help consumers tailor their habits. A medical alert pendant can, in the case of patient incapacity due to a fall, pacemaker failure, etc, automatically inform a response centre from where a PC with AI (artificial intelligence) will contact the nearest ambulance.

 

via The Hindu : Opinion

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Could Siri be the invisible interface of the future?

Could Siri be the invisible interface of the future? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

This article points to how Siri, the "intelligent assistant" app on Apple's iPhone 4S, could act as an "invisible interface" for the "Internet of Things".  Use your voice to interact with things, like your smart home.  A voice command like: “close the windows and turn on the air conditioning if the outside temperature rises above 85 degrees,” could be a real-world example in just a few years time, according to GigaOm writer Kevin C. Tofel.  He's convinced that "the Siri of today is just touching the tip of the iceberg for such a future."

 

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