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Rescooped by Edward Wang from Web of Things
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Big Data in Your Blood

Big Data in Your Blood | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Sensors of your heart, blood, and brain are coming to market. These may a boon to science and personal health. For the companies involved, they may be goldmines of intimate real-time data on millions of subjects.


Later this year, a Boston-based company called MC10 will offer the first of several “stretchable electronics” products that can be put on things like shirts and shoes, worn as temporary tattoos or installed in the body. These will be capable of measuring not just heart rate, the company says, but brain activity, body temperature and hydration levels. Another company, called Proteus, will begin a pilot program in Britain for a “Digital Health Feedback System” that combines both wearable technologies and microchips the size of a sand grain that ride a pill right through you. Powered by your stomach fluids, it emits a signal picked up by an external sensor, capturing vital data. Another firm, Sano Intelligence, is looking at micro needle sensors on skin patches as a way of deriving continuous information about the bloodstream.


Via ddrrnt
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Rescooped by Edward Wang from Web of Things
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IOTA: Internet-of-Things Academy | superflux

IOTA: Internet-of-Things Academy | superflux | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The ambition of our proposed IOTA platform was to support a thriving community involved in imagining, building, and testing projects at the intersection of the physical and the digital. It would provide a space for play and experimentation; a central platform where different 'flavours' of hardware, software and data sets could meet, making it simpler for people to combine a range of elements in ways that support their aims and needs. IOTA addresses key issues around technological literacy, education and empowerment, and the interoperability of various competing standards. As it stands, the internet-of-things has a huge potential to empower users – but could easily end up reinforcing the divide between capable users and those intimidated or outpaced by new technology. We are looking to address this issue by building a real community with active moderators, project curation and rolling community challenges, 'augmenting' a relatively neutral core learning platform with human involvement.


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Rescooped by Edward Wang from Web of Things
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DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body

DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The biodegradable electronics are made using silicon and magnesium encased inside a silk layer. The qualities of the silk determine how long the system lasts before degrading, and since silicon and magnesium are both found in our bodies (in tiny quantities), DARPA assures that the technology shouldn't be harmful, whether it dissolves inside or outside the human body.

 

In medicine, dissolving electronics could be inserted into a wound before closing it up, and could monitor healing or apply heat to the damaged area to speed the process. Then, after a few weeks, the system would simply break apart, which would mean no second surgery to remove it and no more healing needed.

 

... dissolving electronics could mean a lot less e-waste, since your old phones, computers, toasters and what-have-you would biodegrade instead of sitting in a landfill. That, and instead of wearable electronics, why don't we just skip on over to embeddable bio-circuitry? Google Glass is fine to start, but I'm waiting for the disposable contact lens version.


Via ddrrnt
Edward Wang's insight:

Reminds me of Stefanie's idea of compostable 3d printing.

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