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Scrum Done Right: How Spotify Takes On Industry...

Scrum Done Right: How Spotify Takes On Industry... | Web Design Topics | Scoop.it
How has Spotify managed to outperform industry giants Google, Apple, and Amazon? Discover why Scrum co-creator Dr. Jeff Sutherland thinks Spotify is such a great example of Scrum done right.
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Scrum Shortcuts without Cutting Corners - PDF Free Download - Fox eBook

Scrum Shortcuts without Cutting Corners - PDF Free Download - Fox eBook | Web Design Topics | Scoop.it
Scrum Shortcuts without Cutting Corners PDF Free Download, Reviews, Read Online, ISBN: 0321822366, By Ilan Goldstein

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Fox eBook's curator insight, January 2, 2014 8:36 PM

Chapter 1. Scrum Startup
Chapter 2. Attitudes and Abilities
Chapter 3. Planning and Protecting
Chapter 4. Requirement Refinement
Chapter 5. Establishing Estimates
Chapter 6. Questioning Quality
Chapter 7. Monitoring and Metrics
Chapter 8. Retros, Reviews, and Risks
Chapter 9. Managing the Managers
Chapter 10. Larger Lessons

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A Lot of Action, But Not in the Right Direction: Systematic Review and Content Analysis of Smartphone Applications for the Prevention, Detection, and Management of Cancer

A Lot of Action, But Not in the Right Direction: Systematic Review and Content Analysis of Smartphone Applications for the Prevention, Detection, and Management of Cancer | Web Design Topics | Scoop.it

Since the beginning of the 21st century, mobile phones have become nearly ubiquitous. At the end of 2011, there were an estimated 6 billion mobile subscriptions, accounting for approximately 87% of the global population 

 

Rapid technological convergence has led to the emergence of smartphones—feature-rich phones that combine the voice and text messaging functions of basic phones with powerful computing technology that can support third-party applications, sensing, Internet access, and wireless connectivity with other devices.

 

According to a 2012 report from the Pew Internet and American Life Project, 85% of US adults own a cell phone of some kind and 53% own a smartphone 

 

The combination of their popularity, technical capabilities, and proximity to their owners makes them an attractive platform for the delivery of health promotion and disease management interventions 

 

Systematic review methodology, as described by Moher et al , was used to guide the collection and characterization of eligible apps from the official smartphone stores and the evidence on app utility or effectiveness from the health literature. We developed a systematic search strategy that attempted to identify all relevant apps and studies and we provide a systematic presentation and synthesis of the characteristics of the apps and the studies.


RESULTS:

The search of the mobile phone market yielded 1314 potentially relevant apps, of which 309 apps met our selection criteria (Figure 1); 90.3% (279/309) of apps were available on the iPhone or Android markets . Twelve apps were available on more than one platform (10 were available in two stores and 2 in three stores). Therefore, there were a total of 295 unique apps.

 

Release date information was available for only 38.0% (112/295) of the apps from Apple, Android, and BlackBerry, as the remainder had produced updated versions and only published their date of update. Release date information was not available for apps on the Nokia market.

 

Half of the apps (50.2%, 148/295) were free to download. Of those free-to-download apps, 8 were trial versions of the full pay-for-download applications. These free apps offered limited versions of the full apps, restricting access to the full suite of features.

 

The majority of the apps did not describe their organizational affiliation (64.1%, 189/295). Of those that provided organizational information, 63.2% (67/106) were affiliated with a non-profit, 26.4% (28/106) with a commercial company (eg, Health Monitor Network), 9.4% (10/106) with a university or medical institution, and 1 app was affiliated with a government institution (eg, National Institutes for Health).

 

Apps affiliated with not-for-profit organizations (non-profit, university, medical institution, or government) were more likely to be free (?21=16.3, P<.001). Apps that did not disclose their affiliation were more likely to have a price (?21=50.1, P<.001).

 

full article with details at http://www.jmir.org/2013/12/e287/


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Medical Technology Stories To Watch at CES 2014 - Forbes

Medical Technology Stories To Watch at CES 2014 - Forbes | Web Design Topics | Scoop.it
Computerworld
Medical Technology Stories To Watch at CES 2014
Forbes
Three medical technology stories to watch in these areas will be wearable technologies for fitness, aging-in-place technologies, and real-time monitoring.
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Mobile Technology in Healthcare: Real Time Collaboration Saves Lives  at Valley Health

What if an ambulance team could transmit vital patient data to the hospital and initiate consultations with a doctor before transporting a patient? Mobile Te...
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Successful Cases of Mobile Technology in Medical Industry

The medical industry is quickly adopting mobile technology as a means of connecting lay users with medical professionals. Increasingly, smartphone and tablet users are speaking to their doctors, scheduling medical appointments, and even receiving complex diagnoses via mHealth platforms. 

mHealth makes it possible for consumers to receive personalized medical care that may otherwise be unavailable to these individuals. 

In this article you can find cases that include some of the most successful mHealth developments to date. 


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Ricardo Rocha's curator insight, January 11, 2014 10:20 AM

Cases interessantes, alguns ainda longe de serem aplicados em nosso país. #chegaremoslá #interoperabilidade #saudenaveia

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Top health industry issues of 2014

Implications of integrating technology:

 

Under increasing pressure to keep costs down, providers should promote technologies that help manage patients’ health outside of costly care settings.


Shouldering more of their medical costs, health-conscious consumers may be more willing to pay for mobile and other technologies to help manage their health.


Drug and device companies must understand consumer behavior and satisfaction in the social media era.


Reimbursing non-traditional, mobile-enabled therapies may allow insurers to reduce medical costs.


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Here's why the failure of the Obamacare website was entirely predictable - Business Journal

Here's why the failure of the Obamacare website was entirely predictable - Business Journal | Web Design Topics | Scoop.it
Here's why the failure of the Obamacare website was entirely predictable Business Journal In the wake of this mess, President Obama is now pushing for reform of the way the federal government procures technology, including appointing 16 highly...
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2014: The Year Agile Marketing Takes Off - CMS Wire | #TheMarketingAutomationAlert

2014: The Year Agile Marketing Takes Off - CMS Wire | #TheMarketingAutomationAlert | Web Design Topics | Scoop.it

"If you had to summarize all the major IT and marketing trends of 2013 into just six words, you could simply say, "There were a lot of changes." And the five-word prediction for 2014? "There will be even more.""

 

Advanced/ Digest...

 

This is why one of the most interesting trends from 2013 — and one that is poised to grow explosively in 2014 — is the adoption of agile management in the marketing department.

 

Everyone agrees that marketing needs to be agile today, at least in the sense of the adjective: nimble, able to move quickly and easily. But agile marketing isn't an aspiration. It's actually a relatively well-defined management methodology that began in software development circles back in the 1990s and has recently been adapted to serve the needs of marketers.

 

The essence of agile management is straightforward and rests on three main ideas:

First, instead of defining rigid and detailed quarterly or yearly plans, agile handles planning in a more iterative and adaptive manner. Agile breaks down work into bite-sized "sprints" that last for one to four weeks each.

 

Second, agile enables transparency. Everyone can see what is planned for the current sprint, what's complete, what's in progress and who's working on it, as well as the backlog of priorities — what is queued up to be tackled in subsequent sprints.

 

Third, agile emphasizes small, cross-functional teams. Teams are often composed of individuals who cross traditional organizational silos and focus on the collective work of the team as much as their own speciality. Daily stand-up meetings among the team keep them in sync and quickly identify any bottlenecks or impediments.

 

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marketingIO's curator insight, December 15, 2013 4:39 PM

Agile is not a state of mind, but a process that stresses efficiency, quickness and collaboration. It is defined and consistent, not ephemeral. And by the way...it works.