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Rescooped by Joshua Hall from Peer2Politics
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The Internet is changing: What does it mean for you? - Press Herald

The Internet is changing: What does it mean for you? - Press Herald | Web design | Scoop.it

Since its creation, the Internet has operated, at least in the minds of many consumers, like a phone line but with an incredible amount of information and functions available.


Via jean lievens
Joshua Hall's insight:

Fun piece about the changing internet and how it's going to affect us as consumers

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Rescooped by Joshua Hall from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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Move aside, .com: .wed, other domains will make Internet more crowded | Wash Post

Move aside, .com: .wed, other domains will make Internet more crowded | Wash Post | Web design | Scoop.it

Adrienne McAdory, a Washington military contractor, remembers exactly when she learned the Internet was about to get a lot bigger. She was at work, at the Pentagon in 2011, and she saw an article about a nonprofit group called ICANN, which oversees the Internet. She saw that ICANN was going to expand the number of generic top-level domain names from fewer than 20 to what ultimately became nearly 2,000 and that visiting the Web was never going to be the same again.

 

And she knew she wanted a piece of it.

 

First, some terminology. A second-level domain name is everything that comes before the dot in the Web address: Facebook. EBay. Google. These are easy to buy — if the address you want is available, you can purchase it for less than $20 with a click online. The top-level domain of a Web address is everything that comes after the dot: the .gov, the .org, the .mil. They are a foundational muscle of the Internet.

 

What ICANN, the California-headquartered Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, was offering was the chance to create and buy what comes after the dot. All McAdory needed was the $185,000 application fee. Which she had, because, she explains, “I’m old, and I’m frugal” (she’s 42). So she worked through the lengthy application process, named her company “Atgron,” and, two months ago, learned she’d had won the rights to own a domain: .wed.

 

McAdory was part of a land grab — something that could fundamentally change the way average users experience the Internet.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Interesting article about how new domain categories (.wed, etc.) will crowd the web even more

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