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Infographie : le poids du numérique en France - Digital Business News

Infographie : le poids du numérique en France - Digital Business News | web design - AD | Scoop.it
Selon un rapport du cabinet McKinsey, le numérique représenterait aujourd'hui 5,5% du PIB français, ce qui équivaut à environ 25% de la croissance nationale, contre 20% en 2009 ; des chiffres qui témoignent de l'accentuation de la digitalisation de l'économie française.

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Pas de design, pas de produits technologiques

Pas de design, pas de produits technologiques | web design - AD | Scoop.it
On achète rarement un produit pour sa technologie. On choisit surtout une marque ou un bel objet. C’est ce que confirme une récente étude internationale de GFK sur l’importance du design.
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"Sans transformation digitale, les entreprises mourront"

"Sans transformation digitale, les entreprises mourront" | web design - AD | Scoop.it
Près de 200 acteurs économiques et institutionnels ont assisté, le 18 novembre, à une conférence organisée par Orange Business Services à La Grande Motte (34) sur le concept d'entreprise digitale. L'opérateur dresse un constat relativement optimiste sur la vitesse de conversion des PME françaises.
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Une étrange hache géante plantée dans un taxi surprend les passants à Times Square

Une étrange hache géante plantée dans un taxi surprend les passants à Times Square | web design - AD | Scoop.it
Les new-yorkais ont eu la surprise de découvrir un de leurs taxis éventré par la hache de l’un des personnages du jeu World Of Warcraft, Grommash Hurlenfer.
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9 webdesign tips to build an efficient website

9 webdesign tips to build an efficient website | web design - AD | Scoop.it
When building a website and creating the content for it, it is a must to adapt it to user habits. Yet still very little respect t (...)
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Developing a Responsive Website: The Footer | Web development blog, news and tutorials - Developer Drive

At this point we’re just about done with the homepage of our responsive website. We’ve got our navigation in place, our background images resize nicely, and our other elements are able to resize and adjust to various screen resolutions.

 


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Les 5 problèmes du Responsive Web Design

Les 5 problèmes du Responsive Web Design | web design - AD | Scoop.it
Face à l’explosion de la diversité des supports mobiles et de leur utilisation, le Responsive Web Design apparaît aujourd’hui comme l’une des grandes modes du web. Le Responsive Web Design ( (Les 5 problèmes du Responsive Web Design :
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The new rules of the responsive web

The new rules of the responsive web | web design - AD | Scoop.it

Responsive web design has become a near ubiquitous buzzword on the web. Try searching for #rwd on Twitter to find equal parts content and Twitter spam. This is a common phase in the maturing of a new idea. I remember when AJAX was all the rage; the term got driven into the ground. Now, few people talk about AJAX but libraries like jQuery are fully embraced in a developer’s workflow.

This seems to mirror what’s happening to responsive web design. The term is everywhere. A friend of mine is in magazine publishing, she went to a conference recently, and an editor for a well-known new magazine was talking about upcoming trends and mentioned responsive web design. Editors may not be web professionals, but they know the buzzwords.

As responsive web design gained steam, the way we build websites changed. As the term moves from buzzword into a common part of every web design project, the way we work as web professionals needs to change. With this in mind, we need to lay some new ground rules for how we work.

 

Rule 1: Don’t stop at “squishy”

When somebody tells you to “check out this responsive site”, what’s the first thing you do? You probably scale the window to see how the layout changes. I’m probably not going to open it in my phone and tablet and start changing orientations or start running page speed tests. I scale the browser and move on with my day. This is our experience as designers and developers, but not as users. When I visit a site as a user, I have no patience. I don’t care if the site squishes nicely; I just want the thing I want.

“Squishy” is a linear scaling of a website. Does the site go from skinny to fat? Instead of linear scaling, responsive web design should focus on establishing a site core and progressively loading from there, based on capabilities. Imagine a site that had to be built for a tiny cellphone running IE7 on an EDGE network. That should be your core site and then scale up based on screen size and capabilities.

 

Rule 2: Don’t look for an easy way out

Responsive web design is complicated. That’s just how it is. I wish there were something I could tell you to make it easy, but there isn’t. Most people have responded to responsive web design by adding something to their workflows, whether it’s a new deliverable or just going to a developer and asking whether their design will work responsively.

I have a friend who’s working on a responsive site for a client. She’s building the site in Photoshop in desktop size. After a few mockups on some pages, she wanted to show what the site would look like in a tablet and a smartphone, so she did those mockups too. After presenting to the client, she was given some creative tweaks. There are about 50 PSD files for this site at this point. It takes her a few days to revise the layouts.

Trying to add new designs alone will result in a time consuming and inconsistent process. One of the best ways to solve this is by prototyping your wireframes and presenting those to your client. This gives you a deliverable to speak directly to the site’s layout without simultaneously talking about the design. Foundation by ZURB is a great tool for building prototypes quickly.

Simply adding prototypes into your workflow won’t be enough though. In order to succeed in building responsive sites, you need to adjust, which brings us to the next rule.

 

Rule 3: Embrace change

When I first started building websites, I used two tools, Photoshop and GoLive. Now I have at least six programs that I absolutely require in order to build a site. I still use Photoshop for creating graphic elements, but I mostly design in the browser with Sublime Text 2 and I use Safari’s developer tools to inspect elements on my iOS 6. I also use Codekit to compile my pre-processed CSS and Terminal for version control in Git.

Responsive web design also means changing the way you design. Instead of laying out an entire page in Photoshop, I use Samantha Warren’s Style Tiles to articulate visual design. By designing a site’s visual brand and interface elements outside of an actual layout, you can communicate design directly and combine it with the layout from the prototype to create your responsive site in the browser.

CSS preprocessors are also huge help in any responsive workflow. To put it simply, preprocessors can be used to untangle some of the complication of building a site and ease a lot of the repetition inherit to working in CSS. I personally prefer SCSS, but LESS is a better alternative for some as it has a lower barrier of entry and has better documentation.

 

Rule 4: Remember your roots

[The web] should be accessible from any kind of hardware that can connect to the Internet: stationary or mobile, small screen or large. — Tim Berners-Lee

HTML and CSS are inherently responsive. From the inception of HTML, the web was intended to be flexible enough to work on any hardware with an Internet connection. It wasn’t until we as designers and developers moved towards fixed layouts that this changed. In trying to impose fixed dimensions on websites, we constricted the web to desktop computers.

 

Summary

The responsive web is one that abstracts what you have to say from how you say it. Take, for example, NPR’s recent move to an API driven content model. By moving to an API for providing content, NPR has been able to manage its collection of apps and sites in a consistent way. The only thing that changes is the presentation layer.

This is what the responsive web should be all about. Figuring out what it is you have to say, and letting how you say it be driven by that. Design is about meeting a need in a way that is visually pleasing, but also that works to meet the needs of the user.

This is what the responsive web is all about, the user — creating websites that work for the people that use them, however they access the content. Making sites that can refactor themselves for small screens is just the beginning.


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10 Awesome Examples of Ecommerce Sites Using Responsive Web Design

10 Awesome Examples of Ecommerce Sites Using Responsive Web Design | web design - AD | Scoop.it
I spend a good deal of time looking at websites that have been developed using a responsive web design (RWD). Often, many of the websites using RWD are agency


As a snapshot of an industry segment doing as much, here are 10 examples of ecommerce B2C businesses using responsive web design.


1. Skinny Ties

This is one of my favorite responsive retail sites because it provides a wonderful user experience whether I am on my desktop or my iPhone. Looking at this site, it is easy to tell that the designers took a “mobile first” approach to the design. The elements are all very touch friendly, and the site has a consistent look and feel no matter how you interact with it.

2. Folksy

This is a site that focuses on selling crafting supplies and homemade goods. I definitely think it is a good idea for brands who sell this type of product to consider a responsive web design because so many of their customers are accessing social crafting sites like Pinterest from mobile devices. A responsive web design like this makes it easy to shepherd prospects down the sales funnel.

3. United Pixel Workers

United Pixel Workers is a company that sells T-shirts and accessories designed by the web design community. Given its customer base is so tech savvy, it’s not surprising to find the company’s website is as well. The site uses a simple grid that scales very well to fit on smaller screens. I especially like the way the cart and menu buttons adjust at every screen size so they remain easy to find and click on.

4. Tommy Hilfiger

I was actually a bit surprised to find that the Tommy Hilfiger site was responsive because it seems like a lot of bigger brands seem wary of making this change. For many brands with larger websites and huge product selections, the idea of making web content responsive can be a daunting task. However, I think it is a change that must be made, and Tommy Hilfiger has done a pretty good job of making it work. This RWD website isn’t perfect, but it is easier to shop on than most other retail mobile sites I have visited.

5. Currys

I will admit that this website for the UK electronics retailer Curry’s is anything but beautiful. I have chosen to include it in this list because I think it is important to see how an online retailor with a HUGE stock of products can make a responsive web design work effectively. What it lacks in visual appeal it makes up for in usability. Everything on this site is organized and has a purpose. I also like the large navigation buttons that are good for touch and in your face, and the search function which makes searching for particular products a breeze. This site certainly fulfills it’s duty to make purchases simple for customers on any device.

6. A Book Apart

This retail site is the go-to place for educational resources about web design. It is no surprise that the company responsible for publishing one of the first books about responsive web design is utilizing the technology. The A Book Apart storefront layout looks good on every device size and never appears cluttered or crowded.

7. Nuts.com

Just another specialty retailor that seems to be well ahead of the bigger brands. Again, this isn’t the most beautiful responsive website, but it is still successful. The navigation system here is easy to follow, and shopping on smaller devices is a simple, painless process.

8. Burton

I believe snowboard retailer Burton definitely knows its customers are shopping this website from their phones and tablets. The company has made a smart choice in choosing to adopt a responsive web design that gives users the same experience no matter how they choose to shop. I do wish the navigation was a bit easier to click on the mobile screen size, but I like the way they have used images and a simple grid to make the design conform to any screen size.

9. Cocosa

Cocosa is a members-only retail shopping site. You know, one of those websites where you get daily email updates about new and upcoming sales? As someone who is a member of a bunch of them, I can tell you first hand how annoying it is to click on a link in an email and then be sent to a mobile version of the website asking me to download the app. It’s like the catch-22 of mobile shopping. Cocosa solves all that by simply having a responsive website. Click an email link and be sent directly to the RWD website to enjoy the mobile shopping process.

10. Visual Supply Co

Visual Supply Co. has a very simple, straightforward storefront selling photo-editing software. I like that this store has such clean lines, and I appreciate that everything is easy to click on when I access it from my mobile device. Big buttons are essential for touch, especially that big “Buy Now” or “Add to Cart” button!

A responsive web design is the best method to ensure that your website is useable on nearly every device. This is especially important for ecommerce websites, because you never know how and when your customer will try and make a purchase. From fashion to food to educational resources, a responsive web design is a great way for any online retailer to reach customers anywhere, anytime.



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17 Things You Should Stop Doing to Your Websites -

17 Things You Should Stop Doing to Your Websites - | web design - AD | Scoop.it

We see dozens of guides and tutorials on how we should make our websites better to rank, convert, and perform. On the other hand, there’s so much wrong-doing, it can be easier for you to STOP doing some things to get better results with your online presence. Below I’ve outlined the 17 most popular “sins” I’ve identified on my customers’ websites within the last 2 years.


1.    Stop posting pathetic useless promotional content

I do realize, some “boring niche” companies find it pretty hard to create a content strategy and produce fascinating content on a regular basis… But it’s not an excuse for publishing something-of-no-use to anyone. The frequency doesn’t matter that much, focus on the needs of your users, customers and followers. Need inspiration? Take a look at these companies creating great content on “boring” topics.

2.    Stop stealing lame stock images – they are not so super effective anyway

Yes, you got me right – there’s not much sense in stealing stock images. On the one hand, you are abusing someone’s copyright. On the other, many stock photos look rather lame and boring (I just can’t stand anymore the pictures of a team of professionally smiling people).


Image credit

Sorry, I don’t believe these guys :)

Dozens of studies and experiments prove that users are more attracted by amateur pictures that look true-to-life, though they can miss a polished glamorous look. As James Chudley put in his guide on using photos to sell:

  •   Show off your product’s benefits
  •   Make visitors laugh
  •   Tell a story and show how to do something (step-by-step guides with pictures simply rock!)
  •   Be consistent and professional.

3.    Stop ignoring your readers

I’ve seen it everywhere – an interesting post with great points and a dozen of user comments that are left unnoticed. Isn’t the author interested in what readers think? Why not answer their questions, if any? Or, if you didn’t plan to spend time on comment discussions, why did you decide to have a commenting module in the first place?

Talk to your readers, appreciate their opinion, ask them questions, give them links to the related content – this is the way to build up a healthy community!

4.    Stop using big words

If your target audience comprises mostly PhDs, then I may be wrong. If not, consider using simpler wording for your website copy and blog posts. Here are just some examples to give you the idea:

use instead of utilize

near instead of close proximity

help instead of facilitate

for instead of in the amount of

start instead of commence

And since I mentioned the topic of words, don’t forget the mighty five: youfree, because,instantlynew – they won’t do any magic to your pages, but they proved to be more effective regarding conversion rates.

5.    Stop writing “novels”

Users scan texts – it’s a well-known fact still ignored by the majority of bloggers and website owners. Why? Sometimes, because they’ve heard that for the sake of SEO, they should have a lot of text… Or they wanted to write more than their competitors…

Whatever the reason, the result can be pretty sad – your page bounce rates will escalate with the amount of plain unformatted text.

But what to do if you need to cover a large topic? First of all, think of a Wikipedia style and use:

  • Table of contents
  • Internal links
  • Relevant images and photos
  • Make paragraphs concise and short (1 idea per paragraph)
  • Format the page to make it easy to scan


Additionally, you can split really large articles into parts – just don’t forget to link the posts with one another.

6.    Stop using tiny fonts

Well not only tiny, the yellow text on the blue background would make me close the page even faster. The thing is that many websites are designed by designers (and it is logical), however some designers underestimate the importance of text and implement smaller fonts. As a result, we get a beautiful page, but a page we don’t want to read (and even scan).

Did you know that making your content font size a bit larger can even impact the conversion rate?

7.    Stop requiring a registration unless it’s really necessary

Users naturally avoid situations they feel might compromise their privacy. Asking them to register is one of such situations they feel skeptical about. Mike Fisher makes a very good point on registration in his post:

If you need to require registration, make sure that users

  • Understand what they’re getting after registering
  • Believe it’s of significant value to them
  • Know that their personal information will be safeguarded

Offering users to register with their existing Facebook/Twitter accounts can be a good idea, as it simplifies the procedure, however you should still remember the three points mentioned above.

8.    Stop overusing Flash

Just a couple of days ago I discussed a website redesign with the owner of a small dog food shop. When I asked how she wanted the website to look like, she replied:

“I guess there should be some long red curtains and you have to click to open them. After that you’ll find yourself in a cinema hall where dogs and cats are sitting and watching a film about the food for cats and dogs.”

Well, the idea itself may be not so brilliant, but we realize that in most case we’ll need to use the Adobe Flash technology to create something of this kind, which is NOT search-engine-friendly. On the other hand, will this fascinating Flash intro persuade me to purchase more items? I think a smart offer or a coupon discount would work much better!

9.    Stop blending advertising within the content

It’s a little bit frustrating to be lured by an interesting guide or a case study to find out you are just being offered a new copywriting course, an SEO e-book, or paid consulting. Even when you run a pay-per-click campaign, do not lie to users in ad copies – their frustration will fire back so hard.

10.  Stop testing your website in 1 browser only

Pretty self-explanatory. No matter how rare you use IE, it’s still very popular with users.


Image credit

11.   Stop using unreadable captchas

There are some horrible captchas out there… Fortunately, you can use some friendlier versions of them, like these ones:


12.   Stop being afraid of linking out

We should blame the search engines for this one – there were times when people where linking out to the related useful content they wanted to share with the users. Now, what we have today is the COMMON belief in BAD external links. How much PR am I going to lose? What kind of anchor should I choose?

Does this website link back to me? Or maybe I’ll just mention it in text without inserting a link?! Now take a look at Wikipedia articles and you’ll get the answers. Linking out is totally fine.

13.   Stop ignoring the social mentions of your website

Here’s the big truth: even if you don’t have any website-related accounts in social media, you can still be discussed there! Sometimes, you just need to search for your website mentions (either directly or setting up specific alerts with the tools, e.g. BuzzBundle) to discover positive, neutral and negative comments and discussions.

14.   Stop cluttering pages with badges and counters

Well, you can showcase your awards and achievements on the “About” page, but it’s not a good idea to clutter all pages with this information. And most users do not care if they are number 159,780.

15.   Stop lying to customers

This one’s crucial: when you lie to your customers (for instance, do not disclose full payment details), it can cause a catastrophe, burst out on dozens of forums and blogs where people would describe you as a scammer and discourage others from using your service/product.


16.   Stop auto-playing video and audio

That’s annoying and feels like my private space is being violated – I want to decide myself whether I want to watch or listen to anything on your website.

17.   Stop planning – start doing

There’s a lot of internet marketing and strategy dropped on you daily – dozens of ideas and plans to implement. The big question is – are you doing it? Some people take planning so seriously, they never get down to actually implementing the useful stuff. If this is about you – stop planning and start doing something right away, this is the only way to see what really works and make things work better for you.

So what do you think, which sins are worst and which ones you’d like to add to this list?


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Why You Need to Prioritize Responsive Design Right Now - Forbes

Why You Need to Prioritize Responsive Design Right Now - Forbes | web design - AD | Scoop.it
(Photo credit: needoptic) Responsive design is the hot topic for 2013. We've moved beyond mobile and finally reached the point where companies are accepting the fact that the best ROI comes from fully integrated marketing programs.


It’s hard to fully integrate when your website is a convoluted mess of versions for different devices or worse, a single version that renders poorly on different devices.

The case for responsive design has been made clear, and responsive web design even made it onto the ecommerce marketing checklist for 2013. However, companies are still slow to invest the time and money into the development required to turn their antiquated websites into responsive websites that render perfectly no matter what device a person is using.


Now is the time to prioritize responsive design in your budget. To learn why, I spoke with Jody Resnick. Resnick  explains, “With a responsive website, businesses can be in front of consumers at every step of their online journey. People who search for a business’ site, begin reading content and viewing videos from their desktop computers at work, and then look for the same business on their smartphones during lunch are able to continue their research into products and services uninterrupted.

“In contrast, if the business has a traditional website and a mobile site, someone investigating products and services online can become frustrated by the lack of complete content on the mobile site or the inability to navigate through the full site on her smartphone. She might give up the search altogether,” Resnick warns.

“Responsive websites provide continuity between different viewing contexts, remaining completely agnostic to the type of device used and the size of the screen it has. What this means is that the same website will present an optimized layout regardless of which device it finds itself being loaded in.”

Mobile Version of Your Website Isn’t Good Enough

It’s important to understand that having a mobile version of your website isn’t enough anymore. Resnick says, “Responsive websites simplify internet marketing and SEO. Instead of having to develop and manage content for multiple websites, businesses with responsive sites can take a unified approach to content management because they have only the one responsive site to manage. The same applies to analytics and strategy development and deployment. A responsive website means there is only one set of analytics to examine and a single strategy to develop and deploy.

“In addition, responsive websites are easier for consumers to find than traditional or mobile sites because they come up higher in search engines’ rankings,” explains Resnick. “In fact, Googlerecommends responsive web design because having a single URL for desktop and mobile sites makes it easier for Google to discover content and for Google’s algorithms to assign indexing properties to content.”

Responsive Design in the Future

Keep in mind, responsive design is still in its infancy, and the future looks extremely bright. “There are a lot of exciting things coming up with responsive design,” Resnick says. “We’re already using elements of responsive design in web applications, and our developers are exploring emerging areas of responsive design by testing a multitude of integrations that are now available.”

Resnick predicts, “As the internet transforms further into a platform of services and user interfaces that tie those services together, leveraging this technology in the future will allow companies to integrate a plethora of back-end services, such as Facebook, Twitter, Salesforce.com, and Amazon Web Services, and then present the integrated data back out the front-end iad layer on a responsive design so the application looks great on all devices without custom coding needed for each device or screen size. No longer are expensive back-end solutions needed to integrate legacy systems with business partners.”

One thing is certain, you don’t want to fall behind and watch your competitors launch responsive websites while yours is still stuck in 2010 (or earlier). The time to get responsive with your web design is now.


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Storytelling in Web Design: 10 Great Examples

Storytelling in Web Design: 10 Great Examples | web design - AD | Scoop.it

In “Storytelling in Web Design,” I explained the three most basic aspects of storytelling — character, setting, and action — and offered ways to begin including storytelling in web design using basic design elements. In this article, I will examine ten sites that use storytelling and list the character, setting, and action found in each story.


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Brad Tollefson's curator insight, March 28, 2013 3:58 AM

Excellent. 

Ruth Bass's curator insight, March 29, 2013 4:39 PM

add your insight...

Ruth Bass's curator insight, March 30, 2013 2:03 PM

add your insight...

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Visual Hierarchy in the New Era of Responsive Design

Visual Hierarchy in the New Era of Responsive Design | web design - AD | Scoop.it
In this article we will debate the matter of visual hierarchy in the new era; are the same ideas valuable or are there changes that should be implemented?


1. What is Visual Hierarchy?

Even if visual hierarchy sounds a little bit cultured, the idea behind this concept is simple. Visual hierarchy helps in creating a working relationship between the elements of a webpage. Every website has very important items as sign up, call-to-action buttons,contact forms, etc. and other elements that are less important (it doesn’t mean that these are ignorable!). The placement, the color, the size of the most important elements must be suitable to their role. It’s obvious that a “Buy it now” button must be prominent, bold and eventually red (it stimulates to take actions); in this way, the visual hierarchy helps a lot in transmitting a message.

2. The Components of Visual Hierarchy

It’s not exactly delimited which elements help in achieving a visual hierarchy, but there are few that are worldwide accepted:

  • The size. A bigger element has more visual weight than a smaller one.
  • The color. Some colors are considered by the human brain heavier than others (red is the heaviest while yellow is the lightest).
  • The alignment. By creating a structured and aligned webpage, the elements seem to be ranked and the navigation and the effective information gathering of the user is made easier.
  • The contrast. There is a very simple and efficient method of highlighting the most important aspects of a website.
  • The spacing (including proximity and repetition). A wise manipulation of space is vital in creating a useful hierarchy. As an example, by adding many elements closer together these have a bigger chance of being considered similar. It’s enough to check some blogs to see the placement of blog posts to fully understand the idea.

3. Create a Working Visual Hierarchy in the Responsive Era

As I previously stated, web is moving very fast and it’s no wonder that in 2014 this article would be considered old-fashioned. The designers are still in beta phase of testing new and newer ideas and techniques. Anyway, there are enough methods to create a good and most important, working, visual hierarchy.

The size
It’s no rocket science to notice that a bigger element is considered as being more important. The real matter is that the screen will never have enough room for all the items and here the difference is made by the talent & experience of the designer. The interfaces below perfectly exemplify the “size power” in achieving a visual hierarchy. The red cross lets the user know that there is something related to a critical situation (you observed, the app creator used color red- the most heaviest one). The size of it emphasizes the message, and encourages taking action.




The color
It’s redundant to say that the colors don’t differ even if these are displayed on a smartphone or a desktop (yep, there are some sensible differences but the user, in the most cases, won’t notice the differences). By sure, colors won’t ever lose their role and meaning!




The alignment
Alignment and placing are separated by a fine line, and many times it is difficult to see the separation. Personally, I don’t see a huge difference between alignment and placing…somehow, in my mind, alignment is just a distinct type of placing. Anyway, the examples below are eloquent.




In both cases it’s about the “Settings” page. As you may see, the options are added in a list, but in order to make a clearer difference between the various types of items, the lines have different heights. Apparently, not a big deal but it’s a very smart alignment, helping users.

The contrast
The examples below are sufficient to see that contrast is never old-fashioned. Much more, due to high resolution of the screens the contrast and colors will play even a bigger role in the new manner of creating websites.




The placement
The reduced space of the mobile screens puts designers in difficulty, but a creative mind may easily overcome these disadvantages. Another important aspect of the placement is the subjectivity. The placement is wonderful as long as the users appreciate it; else it is in vain…


I really hope that this article is useful and helped other designers to successfully handle the visual hierarchy. Do you have any additional ideas? How do you manage to achieve visual hierarchy in your projects? Please use the comment form to let the readers know your secret best practices.


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69 Web Design Tips {Infographic} - Best Infographics

69 Web Design Tips {Infographic} - Best Infographics | web design - AD | Scoop.it

Designing a killer website takes some work. You certainly don’t want to make the most common design mistakes when designing your new site.


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Les 6 facteurs clés de réussite d’une stratégie éditoriale Facebook | Blog Business / WebMarketing / ManagementBlog Business / WebMarketing / Management

Les 6 facteurs clés de réussite d’une stratégie éditoriale Facebook | Blog Business / WebMarketing / ManagementBlog Business / WebMarketing / Management | web design - AD | Scoop.it
  Les 6 facteurs clés de réussite d’une stratégie éditoriale FacebookCe Dimanche, ce blog accueille Tojo en tant que rédacteur invité. Tojo va alimenter
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60 Brilliant logo design examples for your inspiration - Creative Showcase

60 Brilliant logo design examples for your inspiration - Creative Showcase | web design - AD | Scoop.it
A well designed logo allows your business to create an impact on customers. Logos are necessary for brand identity and it helps to establish your business. In this post we have added 60 Creative and B
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Une étrange hache géante plantée dans un taxi surprend les passants à Times Square

Une étrange hache géante plantée dans un taxi surprend les passants à Times Square | web design - AD | Scoop.it
Les new-yorkais ont eu la surprise de découvrir un de leurs taxis éventré par la hache de l’un des personnages du jeu World Of Warcraft, Grommash Hurlenfer.
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25 Best Responsive Web Design Sites for Your Inspiration | TutorialChip

25 Best Responsive Web Design Sites for Your Inspiration | TutorialChip | web design - AD | Scoop.it

Responsive web designing is remarkably different from traditional designing in terms of technical and creative issues and a careful use of this can do wonder while designing.

 

Here are 25 greate and cool example of responsive web design in action.

 


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Les logos des réseaux sociaux se mettent à nu pour le dépistage du cancer du sein

Les logos des réseaux sociaux se mettent à nu pour le dépistage du cancer du sein | web design - AD | Scoop.it
À Singapour, l’agence de publicité DDB a détourné les logos des réseaux sociaux de manière originale et intelligente pour la Breast Cancer Foundation  
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Really easy responsive design

Really easy responsive design | web design - AD | Scoop.it

It’s no secret that many believe responsive web is the future. Creating a responsive site means that it’s able to adapt to the many different browsers and sizes that are available. If I want to make sure my website I’ve created on my desktop can be seen on a tablet with minium scrolling and zooming, I’m going to be interested in creating a responsive site.

One reason responsive sites have become popular is because it just makes sense. It’s cheaper than creating one or more extra sites for mobile phones and tablets. It also makes sure there’s a consistent viewing experience amongst devices and desktop screens. It’s not fun having to increase the size of your window or scroll horizontally to see an entire website.

While creating responsive web designs is becoming easier, there are some ways to get it going even quicker. Thanks to some CSS and HTML, we can code it right into our sites. Other elements require a bit more work. Either way, we’ve come up with a list to help you put your responsive site together with minimum fuss and maximum results.

 

jQuery pluginsIsotope

Isotope is a jQuery plugin that claims to create magical layouts that cannot otherwise be created by CSS and HTML. It has the ability to rearrange elements inside of a container so they fit within it as it resizes. You can also use Isotope to filter and sort items by categories and such.

 Breakpoints.js

Breakpoint was made with developers and designers in mind. It’s a plugin that allows you to create breakpoints for different browser sizes. When your browser is resized to one of those sizes, the elements are able to fit into the screen. 

 

 

FitText.js

This is one of my favorite jQuery plugins because it’s for fonts. Far too often in responsive web design, people don’t take into consideration that the headlines should be responsive instead of squished into a certain space. FitText allows you to do just that, but remember to only use it for headlines!

 

Response.js

If you like the idea of Breakpoint.js but want more customization, Response.js is the answer. It’s really great for those who know jQuery better than CSS and HTML and need to create responsive web sites. You use your breakpoints, but there’s so much more customization, such as device size, pixel rations and the ability to load different sources for different sizes.

 

TinyNav.js

TinyNav is a lightweight jQuery plugin that allows you to change any menu items using lists to turn into drop down menus when the browser is resized. You can specify the sizes as well as which menus change. Its not that broad in function, but it is very effective for what it does.

 

 

Popular frameworks and systemsResponsive Grid System

This system claims to not be a boilerplate or framework, but just a system to make your designs responsive. It seems to be one of the most flexible ones as it doesn’t restrict you to a certain size or to a certain gridsize. They use different CSS classes that are able to float and create their own columns.

 

Golden Grid System

The GGS is also a system, and not a ‘framework’. They like to refer to themselves as a starting place or guideline for those who wamt to use a certain amount of grids in their web design. You’re given 18 colums on the screen, but 16 to use in your design. You make up your own widths and gutters to use and essentially go from there. 

 

1140 Grid System

For a while, many designers were using web designs that were 960px wide. Then that became to small and they went up. Now many designs are being developed using an 1140px width. This 1140 Grid System allows you to create 12 columns to use in a wide width web design. 

 

Twitter Bootstrap

Bootstrap is one of the most popular frameworks available. It’s a 12 grid framework that has made itself usable cross-browser (including Internet Explorer 7) and can be used responsively in handheld devices. It comes with various styling components, typography and JavaScript to use and create sleek, intuitive sites. 

 

SimpleGrid

SimpleGrid takes the idea of grids and simplifies it. With most grid systems and frameworks, you have these unknown classes and unknown columns. Simple grid has classes that specify what columns are first, middle and last. In addition, you can add different ‘slots’ to the columns to make it seem like there are more columns. It’s a very simple and straightforward framework.

 

 

Other responsive toolsResponsive Web Design Sketch Sheets

Much like any designer or developer, you probably sketch out your designs before you actually go about making them. Hopefully you do. If not, perhaps you should start by using these RWD sketch sheets. They come with difference device and desktop sizes on them so that you can plan everything out.

 

Responsive Design Sketchbook

If you like the idea of the sketching on paper, but want to have all your doodles together, you may consider getting the responsive design sketchbook. It comes with 50 pages, spiral bound with various screen sizes on each page. All the grids and math are already done for you, so this is a great tool for beginners and experts in responsive design.

 

Style Tiles

This is a nice little resource for web designers whether they are looking for something for responsive design or not. It’s a PSD that allows you to get the essence of a website by adding headings (typography), logos, colors and other elements. The reason why this works for responsive web design is because it doesn’t imply any dimensions, just a digital idea with no restrictions.

 

Responsive Calculator

There’s a ton of math involved in creating pixel perfect responsive designs. It’s necessary that your math is correct, as well, because you’ll be dealing with different percentages, widths and browser sizes. To help out, here’s a calculator that gives you the correct math and the CSS to go along with it.

 

Conclusion

It’s imperative that we take notice of what responsive web is doing. Many clients will want to have their sites available to a variety of devices, and it’s just more cost effective to create responsive sites. In addition, most of your frameworks and other resources for responsive design really help cultivate organized and high-quality, standard websites.


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The Top 5 Web Design Trends in 2013

The Top 5 Web Design Trends in 2013 | web design - AD | Scoop.it
Even though the year 2012 came up with different web design techniques the top 5 web design trends in 2013 will surely put into effect more innovative technologies.


2013 is going to be a year that will witness worldwide acceptance of HTML 5 for websites along with CSS 3 brand new features. There were a lot of instances where websites followed complete redesigning during 2012’s last quarter. Provided below are the five web design latest trends for 2013 that will make websites much more flexible and user friendly.

The Responsive Factor

HTML 5 has not gained worldwide popularity simply because it helps in creation of games with canvas as well as showing off cool animation with the assistance of CSS 3. The main reason for its popularity among developers is the fact that web design applications created with it can adjust automatically on small screen gadgets. This feature is also known as fluid or responsive design which helps in adjustment of entire web content on an iPhone or iPad. This year will definitely see more acceptance of this responsive feature as the number of people searching the web on their Smartphone and tablets are increasing at a rapid rate.


Typography

Typography, a segment of web designing has led to the development of a different industry. Stylized and bold size texts are being increasingly used for defining essential points in a website. The emergence of such typography is mainly because of the inception of FontFace system along with CSS 3 where templates of every type can be extracted from everywhere within the web through URL referencing. Therefore, there is no doubt about the fact that typography will certainly be among the top 5 web design trends in 2013.

Single Tone Colour

On top of responsive designing trend, single tone colour has been widely accepted by website designers. Shades of dark red or blue are popular choices nowadays that are being used within the website themes.

Highlight Box

The JavaScript slider which was once the favourite choice of web designers seems to be losing out on its popularity. Instead, highlight boxes are gaining acceptance which generally constitutes of an image in the background along with some article heading or punch line. The highlight boxes are available in various colour tones which offer the designers with different options.

Increasing Number of Web Design Firms

Even though there are lots of web design firms available presently, the number is expected to rise. This is mainly because of the fact that small web designing firms are catering to local businesses with sincerity and punctuality and charge much less than big companies. The number is expected to double in the year 2013. So when it comes to top 5 web design trends in 2013, the emergence of these small but efficient companies is likely to put a great impact on the way websites are designed and even performance.


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Good Web Design Is All About The User

Good Web Design Is All About The User | web design - AD | Scoop.it

It’s easy to get caught up in the private world of web design, spending too much time playing with the latest CSS tricks, or flipping through the coolest design showcases. You start forgetting that your work isn’t all about being on the cutting edge and snagging a web design award or two. The reality is that the latest and greatest design trends are irrelevant, and sometimes even alienating, to the majority of audiences. Unfortunately, that kind of work is often only appropriate for an audience of other designers, and those projects are rare.

So take a step back from trying to one-up your peers, and consider the basics. At the heart of design lies the famous maxim that form follows function. Make sure your work is holding true to that principle by making sure of these three things:

Suitability

You can still be innovative while working with a more sedate style.


The interests of your target audience should always be the overriding consideration in determining the style of your site. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that say, a flight tracker site has to look dry or function traditionally to accommodate its audience. While Adioso has an elegant, modern design, it remains relatively simple by highlighting usability above all other aspects. The layout and styling focus more on elevating the search tool rather than adding “flash” to the design.

Use split testing to understand what your audience responds to.

It’s not hard to find out what kind of people you’re designing for; you can use tools like Google Analytics or pop-up polls to get a sense of your demographics. But after that initial research, it’s still really helpful to continue refining the design, honing in even more on the interests and reactions of your audience.

With split testing (also called A/B testing), you can compare even the most trivial changes to find a difference in success rate. By creating multiple versions of a web page, you can submit side-by-side comparisons for testing with live traffic. Monitoring actions like clicks or sign-ups for a period of time often show a conclusive preference for one page over the other. Then you can take these results and refine them further.

Speed

It seems like just one factor in web design shouldn’t have such a monumental impact on your users. But just a couple extra seconds in load time can have astonishing ramifications on user responses and conversion rates. In fact, about 30% of consumers will start to abandon a website after 5 seconds of loading time. And most of that lag is the result of front-end design decisions.

There are many effective methods you can use to increase site speed.

In order to improve on your site speed, first determine exactly how slow your pages are with a site speed test. Then employ a combination of tactics, like:


  • Simplifying design elements, like reducing drop shadows, images, and other fancy effects and flourishes. Not only can this help your site’s speed, but it can also help give that that’s becoming very popular as an aesthetic choice.
  • Using CSS Sprites to display images, or creating icon fonts for common UI elements.
  • Denoting the height and width of your HTML image tags, so that they can load in their own time, without holding up the rest of the page.

Clarity

Designers are used to questioning the conventions with everything they work on. But for the web, which is still a confusing world for many users, some of these conventions need to be stuck with for now, such as:


  • A search bar that’s easily identified, usually located at top right
  • Breadcrumbs for complex navigational paths
  • A consistent and easily-identified UI system, like the use of pink elements on this site, which signals important information

Aesthetic frills are meant to fill in the spaces left over by solid functionality, not the other way around.

A designer’s work has almost endless flexibility when it comes to producing a beautiful result, but far less flexibility in terms of usability. Starting out with a structure that appeals to and works with your audience ensures that your site is just as attractive to a user as it is to another designer.


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10 ways the role of web designer is changing

10 ways the role of web designer is changing | web design - AD | Scoop.it
If you haven't used your web design skills in a few years, you might be shocked by how much things have changed. We take a look at the most important ways the industry is evolving.


Once upon a time, web design was mainly concerned with visual design, with creatives simply having to think about the aesthetics of a website.

However, over the last 20 or so years, the web designer’s role as changed considerably, as an established language and structure for websites has taken shape.

With so many developments over the years, a web designer now needs many more strings to their bow. Here, we look at 10 ways in which the role of a web designer has changed over the past two decades...

01. Tables are dead

If your sole training in web design back in college was based on using tables, then you're seriously out of date.

At one point, tables were the only way a designer could make a website look how they wanted, and slicing images and shims were the order of the day. Thankfully those days have passed and web designers learning their trade now need to embrace semantic markup and CSS styling.

02. Flash is fading


www.occupyflash.org is attempting to bury use of Adobe's Flash plug-in on the web


Once upon a time, Adobe's Flash plugin seemed to offer designers the perfect answer to their web problems - you could use the fonts you wanted and were not confined to the restrictions of the early internet. But as much as it offered freedom to design, it lacked accessibility and led to great eye candy but a lack of substance.

Though Flash still has its place today, its role as a medium for building whole sites has diminished, particularly since it won't function on Apple's mobile devices. Designers now turn to jQuery and CSS to achieve things that once would have been the domain of Flash.

03. The web no longer apes print


The answer to the question: Do websites need to look exactly the same in every browser?


The old preoccupation with recreating the pixel-perfect medium of print online meant the idea of semantic mark up was left by the wayside. This kind of thinking has now been largely jettisoned, especially since the rise of responsive web design.

The battle is still still not over, though. Designers still love control and it can be hard for people coming from print to accept that the web is a medium that should not be constrained in the same ways.

04. People have increased expectations

People want to get more out of websites nowadays. It’s no longer just an online brochure or calling card, we want more. Users want to interact with a site, to watch video and share their experiences with their friends. Designers have had to learn and adapt... Quickly.

05. Skills need constant updating


Even the most experienced web designer needs to keep updating their skills


Things move so quickly now that the modern web designer needs to be able to spread their skills across several areas in order to achieve their client's goals. It's no longer enough to have an eye for design and a copy of Dreamweaver. Web designers, possibly more than any other design occupation, have to constantly update their skills. The web doesn't stand still for one second.

06. The web is social now


Like it or loathe it, social media is now an integral part of web design


You'd have to have been living under a rock for the last decade not to be aware of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and the like. Social media sharing and integration is really important to any website nowadays, so every designer needs to have at least a rudimentary understanding of how to incorporate it into their client's web strategies.

07. Web fonts offer typographic choice


Services like Font Deck have brought web fonts to the masses


Web fonts are a massive breakthrough for designers. We used to have to export headings as GIFs, making them inaccessible and hard for the client to update. It all seems so archaic now web fonts are so easily incorporated into our websites. We are finally able to have typographic control (pretty much) of our type on the web.

08. The window to the web is varied

The ability to view websites on multiple devices now means more testing. While the thought of this may make you want to weep (you thought dealing with just Netscape and IE was bad?), it has also been the catalyst to establish designing using web standards as the norm.

09. HTML5 is the new normal


Take the HTML5 Test at http://html5test.com


The last few years have seen HTML5 establishing itself as the future of building websites. We're all agreed that we wanted semantic, content-rich websites, but HTML5, combined with CSS3, offers more than that. The relative freedom that a modern web designer has, allows them to convey both the client's information AND impart their style and direction. We've never had it so good!

10. Designs must be responsive


Media queries enable us to make our design respond responsively


A solution that allows a website to respond to the screen size and device it is viewed on has completely shaken up the way we approach building websites and we now have the tools to provide specific styling depending on the size of a viewer's screen. At least in the dark days, despite the browser wars, you only had a couple of screen resolutions to take into account. Luckily media queries have given us the freedom to style specific to different viewport sizes which allows a trulyresponsive website.

Conclusion

Web design continues to forge its own path and move further away from being an extension of print design. It's no longer something any designer can turn their hand to as more and more technical skills are needed and less print skills are transferable.

Although this constant evolution means you never feel like you know it all, it's an amazing area of design to work in and we should relish the challenges we face each day...


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10 Infographics for Learning About Responsive Web Design

10 Infographics for Learning About Responsive Web Design | web design - AD | Scoop.it

Responsive web design, a technique that allows web designers to create flexible web page layouts that change depending on the screen size of the site visitor, allows us to optimize user experiences for the increasingly variable ways people are accessing the Web. If you’d like to learn a bit about this new web design technique, or if you need some basic educational resources to present to your clients, check out these responsive web design infographics .


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Optimizing Typography in Responsive Web Design

Optimizing Typography in Responsive Web Design | web design - AD | Scoop.it

We will be discussing typography vis a vis responsive web design. Our focus will be on typography strictly in relation to responsive web design only.


Introduction

To be fair, responsive web design, by its very definition, already includes some level of responsive typography. Even though many people are unaware or simply overlook this fact, but responsive design comes loaded with macro typographic issues such as line height, column width, etc. Yet, all of this cannot naturally be called complete, and we need to do our own home-work. 


Now, when it comes to implementing typography in responsive design, the approach is simple, and two-fold: first, you need to take care of the type-face itself, that is, the type should resize on the basis of screen size, etc. Second, you also need to bear in mind the stuff related to optimized line lengths (because failing in this second point will mean killing any chances of legibility or readability that your design had).


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