Curation & The Future of Publishing
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How To Curate Content To Make Your Brand Look Good

How To Curate Content To Make Your Brand Look Good | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

The perfect content curation tool should:

- help me analyze my audience and identify their main interests 
- filter and suggest content based on my business goals and relate it with my audience main interests
- identify influencers and field experts (...)
- allow me to personalize my message and the way I communicate with the audience
- provide me insights of how my content curation strategy is going and what could I do to improve it
- make it simple, quick and effective

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

This is an interesting recap of how content curation helps brand development and what is needed in a curation tool.


This was meant as a spec for Groupiest, a tool that unfortunately shut down on June 30 after it's initial lack of traction. But regardless of what happened to this tool, the premises on which it was built still stand And are what you should look for in a content curation tool. 


These requirements can actually be grouped in 3 main areas:


1. Content discovery: at Scoop.it, we've built a semantic search algorithm that helps you discover content from an infinite number of sources (not just the RSS feeds of the sites you know) by simply entering keywords. We also strongly believe that no algorithm is perfect. So we not only improve these results by taking the actions of other Scoop.it users on that content into account but we ultimately let users decide what to publish. Discovery is automated but not publishing as it's the opportunity to add value and exercise judgement and this is what will create a bond with your audience. 


2. Content publishingthis step is not just about hitting publish, it's also about editing your post. Beyond simple formatting, it's about adding your own message to your own voice: your insight as we call it. Bringing context to your audience adds value and helps establish yourself as a thought leader. 


3. Analytics: getting a feedback loop is extremely important to anything you do that you'd like to improve over time. Understanding how your audience responded not just through views but also reactions and conversions is extremely important for us. 


Making this content loop - discover, publish, analyze - easier and faster for themselves is what efficient professionals and marketers should look when trying to streamline heir content curation process. 

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Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 31, 2015 4:48 PM

This is an interesting recap of how content curation helps brand development and what is needed in a curation tool.

 

This was meant as a spec for Groupiest, a tool that unfortunately shut down on June 30 after it's initial lack of traction. But regardless of what happened to this tool, the premises on which it was built still stand And are what you should look for in a content curation tool. 

 

These requirements can actually be grouped in 3 main areas:

 

1. Content discovery: at Scoop.it, we've built a semantic search algorithm that helps you discover content from an infinite number of sources (not just the RSS feeds of the sites you know) by simply entering keywords. We also strongly believe that no algorithm is perfect. So we not only improve these results by taking the actions of other Scoop.it users on that content into account but we ultimately let users decide what to publish. Discovery is automated but not publishing as it's the opportunity to add value and exercise judgement and this is what will create a bond with your audience. 

 

2. Content publishing: this step is not just about hitting publish, it's also about editing your post. Beyond simple formatting, it's about adding your own message to your own voice: your insight as we call it. Bringing context to your audience adds value and helps establish yourself as a thought leader. 

 

3. Analytics: getting a feedback loop is extremely important to anything you do that you'd like to improve over time. Understanding how your audience responded not just through views but also reactions and conversions is extremely important for us. 

 

Making this content loop - discover, publish, analyze - easier and faster for themselves is what efficient professionals and marketers should look when trying to streamline heir content curation process. 

Mediaschool ExEd's curator insight, August 1, 2015 9:52 AM

This is an interesting recap of how content curation helps brand development and what is needed in a curation tool.

 

This was meant as a spec for Groupiest, a tool that unfortunately shut down on June 30 after it's initial lack of traction. But regardless of what happened to this tool, the premises on which it was built still stand And are what you should look for in a content curation tool. 

 

These requirements can actually be grouped in 3 main areas:

 

1. Content discovery: at Scoop.it, we've built a semantic search algorithm that helps you discover content from an infinite number of sources (not just the RSS feeds of the sites you know) by simply entering keywords. We also strongly believe that no algorithm is perfect. So we not only improve these results by taking the actions of other Scoop.it users on that content into account but we ultimately let users decide what to publish. Discovery is automated but not publishing as it's the opportunity to add value and exercise judgement and this is what will create a bond with your audience. 

 

2. Content publishing: this step is not just about hitting publish, it's also about editing your post. Beyond simple formatting, it's about adding your own message to your own voice: your insight as we call it. Bringing context to your audience adds value and helps establish yourself as a thought leader. 

 

3. Analytics: getting a feedback loop is extremely important to anything you do that you'd like to improve over time. Understanding how your audience responded not just through views but also reactions and conversions is extremely important for us. 


Making this content loop - discover, publish, analyze - easier and faster for themselves is what efficient professionals and marketers should look when trying to streamline heir content curation process. 

Thorsten Strauss's curator insight, September 23, 2015 4:30 PM

best practice: content curation

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End of School Roundup: Using Creation & Curation in Education

End of School Roundup: Using Creation & Curation in Education | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

According to the Content Marketing Institute, original content should be the cornerstone of your content marketing. And curating content can raise your brand awareness and bring more visitors to your website. So how do these two fundamental marketing pieces work together? Very nicely. In terms of content marketing in any industry, how you marry creation and curation could mean your success or failure.

Specifically in education, EdTech consultants, teachers and librarians are doing a great job combining creation and curation to showcase student creativity, school information and thought leadership. We've pulled four worthy examples of users in the EdTech space who exemplify using powerful online tools to master creation and curation consistently.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Combining content creation and content curation is a great way to optimize your content strategy. But in addition to showing that, these 4 awesome examples show how leveraging contributions through a collaborative model can take that even further as in the case of the University of San Francisco

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Marta Torán's curator insight, May 22, 2014 8:24 AM

Una combinación perfecta en Educación

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 2014 4:18 AM
End of School Roundup: Using Creation & Curation in Education
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6 ways to rethink corporate knowledge sharing

The quest to effectively share knowledge within a company is one that still appears elusive. How do you keep on top of your competitors’ developments? How do you monitor articles that mention your brand? How do you make sure your teams get the information they need to make decisions and to learn? 

While we never had more ways to disseminate intelligence and knowledge within companies, it's easy to feel overwhelmed so that we're still often perceiving a lack of communication in the corporate world.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Because content curation is a new form of communication, it makes sense to look at both external and internal communication when looking at its application within the corporate world. As the same information overload that plagues our social network and digital media is hurting our productivity too, here's how to leverage content curation for corporate knowledge sharing.

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malek's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:22 AM

How to move from knowledge hoarding to knowledge sharing in  organizations?

José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:54 AM

O uso da curadoria para auxiliar a gestão do conhecimento corporativo.

Terry Yelmene's curator insight, March 20, 2014 8:05 AM

This is a simple breakdown of the problem-prospective solution mechanics involved in organizational information sharing - nice!

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How Content Curation helps reach Millennials

How Content Curation helps reach Millennials | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

We recently spoke with Thomas Listerman, director of e-communications at University of San Francisco, about the private university’s #USFCA – a user-generated project to reach Millennials.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

According to a lot of studies and opinions, Millenials are hard to reach: they're supposed to have short attention spans, be constantly multi-tasking and have low tolerance for messages that don't relate to them. 


Whether or less these are clichés, what the University of San Francisco did is remarkable for several reasons:


1. They're doing with limited resources what some major brands have failed to achieve.


2. They're building on existing behaviors of their community instead of trying to impose new ones. 


3. They measure their success by looking both at overall impact (views, people reached) and contributions - showing clearly that the amplification role of their community is key in their communication strategy.


Impressive use case of content curation for brand development through a community.

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, February 10, 2014 7:18 PM

"In nine months, we have been able to generate 130,000 views and garner over 960 unique contributors" which - Listerman adds - is not bad considering that the University of San Francisco has about 10,000 students. 


A great example of building a community by leveraging existing engagement on social networks and content curation: by curating the best content shared from its community, a brand can gain a lot of credibility, brand awareness and message consistency. 

aanve's curator insight, February 10, 2014 10:28 PM

www.aanve.com

 

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Brand content is not enough. Here's why and how brands can become media.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

This is a talk that I gave at LeWeb 2013 and at the Cristal Festival in December.


While we’ve now seen the power of brand content, it remains very hard for even the largest brands to implement successfully. In addition, it doesn’t solve the question of how to engage an audience on a daily basis. To do so, brands have to become media.

But how?


Very few companies can successfully become integrated media companies like RedBull for instance. Interestingly the media model itself changed over the last few years as we’ve seen with the success of the Huffington Post, BuzzFeed and Upworthy which all have in common that they don’t produce all the content they publish. Content curation is the common keyword to these post Web 2.0 new media rockstars. In preparing this talk, I considered the alternative curation creates for brands and highlighted a few case studies of successful implementations that leverage content curation as a way for brands to become media.


And for those who's rather watch, here's the LeWeb video.

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Nick Hester's curator insight, December 20, 2013 9:43 AM

You can curate content from all over the world and you do not have to  stick to the modern era to make your points... 

John Thomas's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:37 PM

Brand content is not enough. Here's why and how brands can become media.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 10, 2014 11:52 AM

Brand content is not enough. Here's why and how brands can become media.

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10 ways brands can use social curation for marketing


Via Ally Greer
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Creative list of ideas on how brands can use content curation. While established brands may not have the "how do I raise above the noise" question that b2b companies or SMB's have, they still have much to do to engage their audience. It's one thing to have 100,000 likes on Facebook; it's another to have them react and amplify a brand's content. This list comes useful for CMO's looking for answers to that engagement question.

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:03 AM

Amazing

Witmer Group's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:59 PM

Great slides!  I like the clean design and meaningful content of each slide. 

Bornstein Law & Bay Property Group's curator insight, November 21, 2013 4:45 PM

We can always use more marketing tips, enjoy. 

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Can content curation be copyrighted?

Can content curation be copyrighted? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

After a testing few months for Spotify with criticism from artists, the streaming music service has a new foe: dance brand Ministry of Sound. 


The company is suing Spotify for copyright infringement, claiming that the service has refused to remove user playlists that mirror Ministry of Sound compilation albums, including some that use the brand’s name in their titles.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:


I'm not a lawyer and I don't know how British law will rule that. But the mere existence of a lawsuit shows some believe enough in the value of content curation - what the Ministry of Sound effectively provides when producing their famous compilation albums - to think it should be protected by copyright or trademark law.


Seems a bit meta? Probably. And it also shows the limits of copyright law growingly challenged by the remix culture.

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Jenn Alevy's curator insight, September 4, 2013 11:31 PM

This is timely, discussing copyright with students this week. Thank you!

A. Brian Dengler's comment, September 5, 2013 3:14 PM
This is a fascinating issue. The names of songs listed in alphabetical order would be mere facts, and facts are not protected by copyright law, at least in the US. However, compilations that include editorial judgment in its selection of songs (the songs may fit a certain genre, reached a certain point of sales and appeal to a specific market), just may be protected by copyright. However, then you get into other analysis: did the postings on Spotify "copy" the Ministry of Sound's compilations, and how much originality did Ministry of Sound use to create the compilation? The outcome will be fascinating.
Alejandro Tortolini's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:55 AM

Debate: curaduría de contenidos y leyes de copyright (caso Ministry of Sound versus Spotify)

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Consumer Attention - the 'New' Media Currency

Consumer Attention - the 'New' Media Currency | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

While the task of grabbing a consumer's attention and communicating a brand's proposition has become increasingly difficult, the rewards for the brands that solve the problem are exceedingly high.


Via i-SCOOP
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Edward Montes makes a very important point in this post: we are not using the right currency to measure what's important for media (readership quality but of course advertising). We're still counting page views and clicks but what matters is attention. 


Content is developing into a new economy where the scarce resource is attention - not content. While some see this shift in the value chain as a threat, it is clearly an opportunity to embrace by becoming the trusted resource in a domain as a content curator.

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Angela Ferrari's curator insight, June 14, 2013 12:43 PM

I think this seems to be the trend nowadays...

Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, June 15, 2013 8:02 AM
Great book by a couple of Harvard profs The Attention Economy supports points made here nicely.
Andrea Norwood's comment, June 24, 2013 11:20 AM
I agree that you have to have the right person(s) to interact with your customers, because if you as the first paragraph states above when it asks the question, would you put a rude staff member or as I put it an unattentive staff member at your front door? Well, I won't anymore, because if you do, this could mean your story going nowhere and eventually you lose your audience and so on, and so, yes, I agree that you need a powerful and great marketing team, one who is willing at all costs to help you promote your fiction book, biography, poem or whatever you are marketing in order to have a great product that sells beyond!
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Every Company Can Be a Media Company. And should be.

Every Company Can Be a Media Company. And should be. | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"If there's a universal truth in the digital age it's that there's too much content and not enough time to consume it. Naturally, a challenge this large and far reaching is creating opportunities for innovators." writes Steve Rubel of Edelman on the new LinkedIn Tought Leaders section.


He goes on to explain how Scott Beale of Laughing Squid is a great example of using curation to become a media that serves the purpose of developing a company's brand in the age of online media. 


"The lesson here is that any company can potentially benefit by thinking and acting like a media company (...) However,you don't necessarily need to create original content."


Great case study.

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Nadine Hack's comment, December 12, 2012 3:30 AM
Learning about this as I'm doing it.
Murray McKercher's comment, December 12, 2012 6:21 AM
As a brand development tool..becoming a publisher is a great idea..however...there are good publishers and bad publishers..in the early days of the internet when eveyone thought building a web site was agreat idea..we saw a lot of "bad" website design...from both an aesthetic view and a information view...I fear history may repeat itself with these new curated content sites...that said I am also experimenting with the concept and suggest everyone look for advice when launching their "site"...
Murray McKercher's comment, December 12, 2012 6:21 AM
As a brand development tool..becoming a publisher is a great idea..however...there are good publishers and bad publishers..in the early days of the internet when eveyone thought building a web site was agreat idea..we saw a lot of "bad" website design...from both an aesthetic view and a information view...I fear history may repeat itself with these new curated content sites...that said I am also experimenting with the concept and suggest everyone look for advice when launching their "site"...
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Curation Is The New Black; But Will It Get In The Black?

Curation Is The New Black; But Will It Get In The Black? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"There’s a lot of talk about content curation; but is anyone making money?" asks Deanna Dahlsad on her blog. 


Though I can assure her we have plans to make some at Scoop.it (we've had premium offers from day 1 and they're ramping up very nicely), her focus is actually more on the curators themselves.


How can individual curators make money? She's not talking about brands or businesses who have an opportunity to get brand awareness or thought leadership out of this. She means the individuals who are willing to become professional curators and need to make some revenue  to justify it. Like some bloggers do. 


As I've outlined before, I think the answer will come from a mix of advertising (which can be promoted posts or sponsoring) and subscription revenue. This is not an original answer but we're starting to see some of our users do that:

- Check out http://hdslrnews.planet5d.com/ for an example of a sponsored topic;

- Some others want to be paid by their clients for their curation work and start to implement our privacy feature for that reason.


But maybe this picture needs to be looked at in a bigger way: in itself, blogging isn't either a massive revenue generation opportunity. There aren't that many blogging millionaires who make a fortune purely out of subscribing people to their blogs or selling ads on it. But most of the time, they're able to combine some direct revenue with offline or other services that their blogs help position and thus contribute to sell. 


Isn't combining that Content Marketing aspect of Curation with some direct revenue-generation the real winning bundle for Curators? What do you think?


Via Deanna Dahlsad
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Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's comment, October 3, 2012 8:31 AM
Indirectly I've monetized my use of Scoop.it by driving traffic to my websites. I'm working on a whitepaper that will explain how. Right now I'm still gathering analyitic results for it.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, October 3, 2012 9:37 PM
Looking forward to read that Brian! I'm curious what you guys think of a solution like http://linqia.com - we've been exchanging with their founders on whether it could be a good solution for our users or not. Nothing decided yet but as we're discussing monetization, I'd love to have your thoughts (or anybody else's interested in that).
Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's comment, October 5, 2012 1:16 AM
I've always wondered about the legal part of putting ads with curated content. Say I scoop a New York Times article word for word and there is an ad displayed on Scoop.it with the copied article.
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How to create brand engagement with new audiences using content curation and the right editorial approach: the case of Intel IQ

How to create brand engagement with new audiences using content curation and the right editorial approach: the case of Intel IQ | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Pretty interesting analysis of Intel IQ's initiative and how it can be generalized to other types of smaller busiensses.


Good summary of what Content Curation can bring to a Content Marketing Strategy.

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Every media company is a media company ... and there's the rub

Every media company is a media company ... and there's the rub | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"Media companies are in trouble because they have to compete against a multitude of companies producing media as a loss leader."


This is an interesting analysis by Tom Foremski on ZDNet that shows how much companies have now invested in the Publishing space. Be it through Content Creation or Content Curation, Social Media makes every brand a publisher. And it's bad news for traditional media which have to reinvent themselves.


Great read.

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TED Becomes a Publishing Platform

TED Becomes a Publishing Platform | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"TED has become a publisher (curating content and disseminating it) and a publishing platform (a format designed to attract and disseminate more content). The platform is akin to other new forms of publishing such as blogs or tweets. A TED talk is something that can be described and that gives it informational power.

TED could have done the traditional publishing thing — put up walls and sold exclusivity. Instead, it has chosen to embrace the notion that information has the most value when it is shared widely. Perhaps traditional publishers of other forms of media should take note"


 TED is now one of the most powerful and visible brand in the world. Not only because they produce qualitative content, but curate, select and spread ideas they believe in widely.


Pretty inspiring. And convincing.

So, who wants to be a publisher ?

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Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Content Curation (but were afraid to ask)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Content Curation (but were afraid to ask) | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"What can content curation do for you? Who is it for? What are interesting case studies? How does content curation help SEO? What's the ROI of content marketing in general and how does content curation help improve it? What features does Scoop.it have? How do they work?"

These are just some of the questions you'll find answers for in our newly revamped resource center as well as in our brand new product tour page.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Our curation of the best answers we could find to all these questions.


Enjoy! 

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How to Unleash the Power of Employee Advocacy

How to Unleash the Power of Employee Advocacy | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Every one of your people can become an advocate for your organization and your brand – an employee advocate.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Excellent point made by Mike Bailey that reminds me of an argument also made by Marketo here. And exactly the trend we see happening with more and more of our enterprise clients at Scoop.it: while a lot of companies are still in a command-and-control mode with small marketing teams in charge of every aspect of outbound communication, we see a growing number of organizations realize they need to leverage their employees - and their employees social network - so that their communication becomes much more effective.


As the graph above explains, an employee sharing content to their networks has up to 20x more impact than when the brand does it (when you normalize their number of followers/friends).


Content curation plays a key role here: you not only need to create relevant and engaging content hubs for employees but they need to be easy for them to curate, share and publish from. As often, adoption is key and you need systems where employees can easily take ownership through a rewarding experience which seems to be what's driving more and more demand to use Scoop.it internally within the enterprise

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3 Time-Saving Strategies for Curating Outstanding Content to Your Audience

3 Time-Saving Strategies for Curating Outstanding Content to Your Audience | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Content curation” is a content marketing strategy that involves gathering content that you think your audience will find interesting from outside sources and then sharing it with them. 

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Find sources, organize them and focus on a precise topic: interesting to read as these are the 3 pillars at the core of any successful content curation workflows.


One piece is missing though: making sure your curated content is part of your content hub where visitors can not only interact with your personal or business brand but also discover the context related to it.

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Comunicologos.com's curator insight, March 7, 2014 6:53 AM

Estrategias para ahorrar tiempo en la Curación de Contenidos

Gary Harwell's curator insight, March 20, 2014 12:29 AM

Getting stuff is one thing but getting the right stuff is another.

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4 ways to leverage the Interest Graph through impacting Content Curation

4 ways to leverage the Interest Graph through impacting Content Curation | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

As the volume of content published on the Internet continues to grow, consumers can help shield themselves from the noise that doesn't matter to them by curating only the content that matters on interest graph platforms

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Content curation and the Interest Graph are two different things but are deeply connected. While some content curators like Maria Popova are great at being eclectic, a lot of value to readers come from being able to discover and read from publishers who address the specific niches they're interested in. 


Chad Politt from Digital Relevance clearly establishes that connexion in this contribution to the Huff Post and I would draw the following conclusions for content strategists and content curators:


1. Leverage the interest-graph on platforms where you can easily be discovered by people who can then share your curated or created content: Scoop.it is of course one of them but Quora is another and Reddit also adds value there (I would actually challenge the notion that Twitter is really interest-based: when you're on a niche and you're not Justin Bieber, it's actually hard to be discovered just by being on Twitter).


2. Don't expect readers or machines to do all the work: add context and value to connect the dots as content curators should to make the highest impact to readers. Tell them what's in it for them so that they memorize you - not the machine or the Twitter algorithm - as the essential resource that brought them that knowledge. 


3. Be clear on your topic(s): you can have several target segments in your audience but defining topics where you'll be consistently able to publish your own content or relevant third-party content will help you raise above the noise. All the more than as Chad points out, social networks and search engine will be better and better at surfacing content specifically on readers' interests. As an example of that, we've now seen the share of traffic from Google Search to Scoop.it topic pages raise to 40%+ through the various algorithm changes they went through. 


4. Be your own content platform: if you're just sharing content on social networks, you're missing out. Bringing readers to your own content hub will help readers idenitfy your expertise on a specific topic and remember your brand. It will also create higher engagement: visitors to Scoop.it pages read on average ~3 pieces of content which is much higher than what you'd get from a simple click on a Facebook post. 


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Is Content Curation Biased?

Is Content Curation Biased? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Our knowledge sharing institutions of today are beginning to “humanize,” to focus more of their resources on creating readable, shareable media than on reporting cold, hard facts, simply to stay relevant and on top of peoples’ online radars. To make facts more palatable, many medias will interpret ideas with respect to their own unique brand Point-of-View, one only has to consider CNN versus FOX news here in the USA. But, do institutions who stand and a major knowledge source for world readers have a responsibility to keep bias out of their findings?

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

As social media is quickly becoming the most important distribution channel for information, @theclairbyrd observes that editors and writers are adapting by making their content more viral and engaging but also less objective.


I wanted to elaborate on her post to reflect on whether content curators were also adding to that trend.


Is Content Curation biased?


At first look it seems that yes. As content curators, we're humans and we all have an agenda - consciously or not. And the very nature of curation implies editing, enriching and spinning content in a different light for our own audience. When we edit a title, when we add an insight, we bring value and meaning but this is not neutral.


But on the other hand, while we can't escape our human conditions and the biases that come with it, we content curators can also play an important role to turn information into objective knowledge. By linking to sources, by publishing several pieces of content on the same topic, by giving voice to various opinions, we can give a more complete picture than a single point of view. And because we don't create the content we curate, we don't have the bias of ownership but can show other conflicting sources to let our readers make up their minds from a plurality of opinions.


Have you tried that with your own curated content? Do you use content curation as a way to show multiple points of views on the topic you curate?

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5 Ways to Rethink Corporate Knowledge Sharing

5 Ways to Rethink Corporate Knowledge Sharing | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it
The quest to effectively share knowledge within a company is one that still appears elusive.  How do you keep on top of your competitors' developments?  How to do you monitor articles that mention your brand?
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

While up until recently enterprise social networks have been all the rage in the corporate world when it came to inventing new solutions for knowledge sharing and intelligence, more and more people seem to believe they're not enough.


Information overload for some, lack of engagement for others: this looks a lot like the problems the consumer social media space seems to have so it's no wonder content curation is getting traction in that space as well as @Andrew Federici observes in this post. 

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Marty Koenig's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:06 AM


There is so much more corporations can do to share knowledge. Sharing conversations using IM and private social media like Yammer is just the tip of the iceberg. I believe curation will be one catalyst that solves the firehose issue and lets people engage in the topics they are interested in for their career aspirations and adding more value to their employer. Scoop.it will be the leader in this next quest.

Jordi Carrió Jamilà's curator insight, November 12, 2013 4:08 AM

Interesante artículo de cómo enfocar la curación en las empresas

Stepanov Sergey Mikhailovich's curator insight, March 20, 2014 5:19 PM

Music " Reflection " for Independence of Ukraine.
http://soundcloud.com/stepanov-sergei/reflection-1
       FIND...
Find your dream , find your way , find your star ,
find your love, find your friend,
find your beat in your heart .
       FIND
Find your dream, find your way , find your star ,
find your love, find your friend,
find your love to Ukraine .
                                                         by  Stepanov      Ukraine

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5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online

5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

The communication of knowledge and ideas is intrinsic to the human condition. Our earliest ancestors had a rich oral tradition, through which they passed on what they knew about the world, often across great distances.


Today, the avenues available to our quest to gain and share knowledge are boundless, but I’d like to share with you five of my own personal favorites.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

As those of you who read the Scoop.it blog have seen, we've started to invite guest bloggers to share with us ideas on how knowledge sharing was evolving. Knowledge is at the core of everything we do, be it marketing a company, selling a product, raising awareness for a non-profit,  developing our personal brand and of course in education per se. 


Lindsay Brunner is an accomplished creative writer and Creativity Curator for Delivering Happiness, the new company by Zappos' founder Tony Hsieh. Here's her take on what are the tools and ways to make the most of the online opportunity to share knowledge.

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John Burik's curator insight, June 20, 2013 10:27 AM

Sharing knowledge is a way to increase happiness for many of us. At the same time it's a good idea to consider how much information we are sharing in which particular context. As we've recently learned even searching for information can have its cost in the amount of personal information we are sharing. While google has been my first choice for many years I'll likely be using http://duckduckgo.com much more frequently.

Andrea Norwood's comment, June 24, 2013 11:00 AM
I love it when others share information with me, whether it be business, political, in which I am not all that much into, but it still helps to know what's happening in the world of politics, or whether it be history of old or new, knowledge is the key to life and especially education.
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Should Brands Have Newsrooms?

Should Brands Have Newsrooms? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Brand newsrooms are a hot new trend in marketing. To believe the hype, every brand should be staffing up with journalists and going 24/7. In reality, the model’s not right for the majority of brands.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Brian Solis wrote "every brand should become a media to earn relevance".  And the trend for companies to partially become media companies is strong. This interesting article looks at whether this means they should have their own newsroom because they can (as Virgin's Mobile head of global marketing Ron Faris puts it "We created our newsroom for a fraction of what it costs to create a 30-second spot"), whether they should rely on an agency or whether they should simply pass.


While I would tend to agree with Saya Weissman's conclusions that going all the way to a newsroom isn't appropriate for all brands, I see a larger in-between opportunity around content curation for brands. Producing unbiased, relevant and engaging content on a regular basis is not only tough: it might be impractical. Building on external sources and 3rd-party content has always been an interesting way to enlarge any discussion.

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Tagmotion's comment, March 3, 2013 10:46 PM
Perhaps the biggest brand in Australia to create the biggest newsroom is the AFL (Australian Football League). It's a no-brainer for bodies governing sport because they have huge audiences with insatiable appetites for content AND they own the content. And while the peak bodies are themselves known and 'trusted' brands, they sometimes come in for a lot of criticism, which means they are perhaps not trusted as much as independent media brands. And that's also why there will probably always be a role for independent media outlets & bloggers. If they don't all get hired by the newsrooms of the powerful sporting bodies!
Alexander Hamilton's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:39 AM

Should the "newsroom" be a part of the proffessional services marketing strategy? 

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How much B2B traffic can Content Curation bring to a website? Study finds 464% growth in just 4 months.

How much B2B traffic can Content Curation bring to a website? Study finds 464% growth in just 4 months. | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

This is a very interesting case study by the team at B2B Content Engine on the impact Content Curation has on a B2B web site's traffic. B2B sites typically have niche audiences which are hard to find from untargetted methods and costly to generate with targeted advertising.


What this study shows is that consistent content curation provided not only impressive results on traffic growth but also lead generation conversion at a 12% rate. In addition to many other great benefits such as brand visibility, awareness, etc...


It also gives an idea of the volume of content that was required to achieve that, which - compared to what we see users typically achieve on Scoop.it - is very similar and reasonable. 


It also supports some other best practices we've mentioned already such as:


- being multi-channel: traffic doesn't come from one source but combining several channels (linkedin, twitter, ...) is key; it's what we call the hub model.


- frequent publishing: it's not about reaching our massive volumes so much than it is about publishing every week.


- use of topic site customization or web site integration to facilitate lead conversions (typically what Scoop.it Business allows to do very simply)


- giving context is important: for readers but also for SEO reasons.

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ben bernard's comment, January 9, 2013 11:41 PM
thanks ! http://www.scoop.it/t/direct-marketing-services my newly made scoop.it :)
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Using Curation to Create the Perfect Content Marketing Mix

Using Curation to Create the Perfect Content Marketing Mix | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Digital Publishing Software Uberflip released today an infographic on Curation and Content Marketing that has some interesting data on what Content Marketers see as their key challenges and what their main objectives are when considering Content Curation.


This data is supported by other similar observations that show Content Marketers are now clearly identifying Content Curation as a way to establish thought leadership and increase brand visiblity while saving time compared to a Content Marketing strategy that would solely rely on Content Creation.

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Content Curation Can Inform, Engage Customers

Content Curation Can Inform, Engage Customers | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Interesting data on how marketers see curation as a way to drive thought leadership, develop brand visibility and boost SEO.


The Study also touches upon what marketers see as challenges blocking them from doing more Content Marketing. Time is clearly an issue high on the list together with the ability to create original content.


Interesting results (also measuring progress between 2011 and 2012).

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Ginny Dillon's comment, June 5, 2012 8:05 PM
Need more hours in the day :) Thnx!
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Intel's multi-million dollar "Creators Project' - can great curation build brands?

Intel's multi-million dollar "Creators Project' - can great curation build brands? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"Intel is funding a global events and artist showcase: The Creators Project. Can avant-garde artists help it it sell more microprocessors?"


Tom Foremski - who's been watching curation as a trend for quite some time and who also started the SF Curators salon, a group where we contribute - reports on an interesting initiative by Intel to use curation to support its brand. Interesting read.

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