Curation & The Future of Publishing
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It's True: We Really Are All Publishers Now, Including Brands

It's True: We Really Are All Publishers Now, Including Brands | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

An interesting recap on what brands have been doing to leverage content publishing capabilities in a successful way.

The recurring message in all these examples? Content Marketing works and is the new advertising as publishing gets democratized.

Author Amy Vernon concludes that this trend just raises the bar for content creators like such as writers like herself, photographers or video producers: "It just means that we all need to make sure we're providing some sort of value to our readers." Interestingly, the democratization of publishing pushes creation quality up. I would add that it's not just because deep-pocket brands play the game too but also because "everyone is a publisher" means everyone is an active content distributor too. And we don't like to curate bad stuff...

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Curate, create and conquer: Journalism 2.0 startups to watch

Curate, create and conquer: Journalism 2.0 startups to watch | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Investors see strong potential in the companies that curate, rather than create, content. A group of technologies broadly defined as “personalized news aggregators” or “content curators” have emerged to distribute information, recommend news articles to users and offer publishers opportunities to monetize content through targeted advertising.

 

Interesting recap of the startup ecosystem in the content space.


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Information Overload? Don't Panic!

Information Overload? Don't Panic! | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

At a time where some are thinking we urgently need an information diet, Brian Solis puts things in perspective: don't panic!


What he describes on PandoDaily as "the fallacy of Information Overload" is the fact that while we all seem lost at one point or another because our world is changed by the social media revolution, it's both inevitable and something mankind will adapt to.


This post is a great summary of the different ways we are affected and why we shouldn't try to move back to the previous state. But work on improving our filters.


Curation, anyone?

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Beth Kanter's comment, January 24, 2012 10:49 AM
I reviewed the book, Information Diet,yesterday - http://www.bethkanter.org/info-diet/ it is excellent. He talks about curation as part of the solution, although it is framed as information literacy
Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 25, 2012 12:51 PM
Thanks for sharing Beth: will go check your review!
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Why Curation Is Important to the Future of Journalism 

Why Curation Is Important to the Future of Journalism  | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Very interesting blog post exploring the intersection between the new curators and the ones who have played this key role as trusted sources of information since a long time: reporters and journalists.


"The concept of curating news is not new. One can look to the supply-chain process of a news organization to see that several roles (editor, managing editor, etc.) have curation as a core competency; that is, the organizing of information filed by reporters into a deliverable packages for readers.

But with the push of social media and advancements in communications technology, the curator has become a journalist by proxy. They are not on the front lines, covering a particular beat or industry, or filing a story themselves, but they are responding to a reader need. With a torrent of content emanating from innumerable sources".

So, do these new gatekeepers have to apply the same ethical standards that news organisations?

or a curator is by definition leads by passion and a less neutral role? 


"..curators should have more freedoms than traditional reporters in a couple senses, in that part of the appeal of good curation is that it carries the person’s footprint. Opinion isn’t really a bad thing, and in fact gives the content shape in this context.” 


Interesting debate, where they key value stays the same: the curator has to find the best practices and guidelines to build trust with his/her audience, in a world where we receive a massive amount of information and content.

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Is Sarah Lacy's PandoDaily the Tech HuffPost of Silicon Valley - mixing creation, contribution and curation?

Is Sarah Lacy's PandoDaily the Tech HuffPost of Silicon Valley - mixing creation, contribution and curation? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, former TechCrunch writer Sarah Lacy launched PandoDaily.com with the goal of being "the site-of-record for that startup root-system and everything that springs up from it, cycle-after-cycle".


Really? But I thought the golden era of Tech Blogging was over (for Jeremiah Owyang and others)? I'm not sure whether Sarah Lacy agrees but what I like is the mode of operation she's chosen: "We want to break every story. But we also want to bring more civility into the blogosophere. We’ll link to people who beat us on a story and be good sports about it, as much as it pisses us off. (...) We’ll still publish the rants you’ve come to love from our mouthy contributors, but unless they’re newsy, they’ll go on something we’re calling “The Back Page.”" She also introduces the PandoTicker, a news timeline of external content that the site will link to throuh a post one "paragraph long, with one sentence of our analysis".


So it seems that PandoDaily will be based on a mix of creation, external contributors and curation.


Seems familiar?


Looks to me like the HuffPo model - which I mean in a positive way as probably one of the only models that have been working in publishing lately. Surprising for those who followed the TechCrunch/AOL drama under Arianna Huffington's rule which led Lacy to quit? Maybe not so much.


Smart move anyway: a good thing for startups and another sign of the growing importance of curation for publishing.


(Read more on why she started it on Pandodaily.com).

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The End of The end of Publishing? Impressive Video (To Be Watched in Full)

Watch this amazing video, prepared by the UK branch of Dorling Kindersley Books and produced by Khaki Films (http://www.thekhakigroup.com/).


Publishing is not dead. It is alive as never before. You just need to do one thing : open your eyes to the values of your customers and publish content meaningful to them.


Like curation, Publishing is about caring.

 

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Google Just Made Bing the Best Search Engine

Google Just Made Bing the Best Search Engine | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Yesterday, I curated an interesting analysis by Mathew Ingram on what Google had just done to its Search Engine, getting social in the results. I think it is interesting seeing also the counter-reactions to that move, one of the boldest being Mat Honan's on Gizmodo.


Mat explains why he feels this created less acuracy for Google and threatened the Moutain View giant's domination on the Search market: "I just switched the default search engine in my browser from Google to Bing. And if you care about working efficiently, or getting the right results when you search, then maybe you should too."


One interesting thing that Mat's point shows is the difficulty there is for an established company to act like a startup. Google has something to lose in that game. In a big way. But it's also the sign of great companies and great leaders to be able to make bold moves that are not always easy to understand first: IBM getting out of hardware, Apple extending out of the computer market with the iPod. 


Back to the curated search debate, I think we could also echo the voices of all those who have growningly complained about the fact Google Search was losing its edge and discouraging quality content production efforts. I don't think Mat disagrees with them: he's just showing consumers will not wait forever for Google to come out of that evolutionary process that started with real-time search, continued with Panda and is now becoming social search.


Google (and others) seems to be convinced their long-term future is in social, however costly this might be in the short-term. Time will tell whether that was a mistake or not. But there's one thing you can't blame them for: not being willing to try.

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Is Social the new SEO? Or when "Curation comes up when Search stops working"

Is Social the new SEO? Or when "Curation comes up when Search stops working" | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"With new changes that offer personalized search results -- most of which are being taken from its own Google+ social network -- Google has just made social connections and links the new search-engine optimization strategy"


Interesting analysis by Mathew Ingram on what Google just did by tweaking search results to include Google + results in there. And in particular what this means for the Media industry.


If you're not familiar with the change, the article describes it well and there's another piece you can check that will probably freak out some.


To elaborate on Mathew's point, I would put it more concretely: the time where Media could simply use Twitter or G+ accounts like RSS feeds is over. User engagement is required and it means getting readers to like, comment, +1 and... curate your content.


Clay Shirky once defined curation's role this way: "Curation comes up when search stops working".


Well, now if you want your content to be searched, you better start by making it curated.

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Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 12, 2012 3:44 PM
No worries: I know it can be. We're working on making the rescoops more obvious as even though we changed the system, it's still not clear enough to me. More to come on this. Thanks Jan!
Neil Ferree's curator insight, April 18, 2013 12:25 PM

Social Shares is the Future of SEOYou are the Brand so you need to make sure your http://bit.ly/RichSnippet is set-up Properly

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, October 29, 2013 8:40 PM

The correlation between social signals and SEO rankings have been stronger and stronger through the recent Google algorithm changes. Here's what it means for the media which is actually an interesting read for any content creator.

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Filter bubbles burst, blind spots shrunk, curation over SEO: Rachel Sklar’s predictions for 2012

Filter bubbles burst, blind spots shrunk, curation over SEO: Rachel Sklar’s predictions for 2012 | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

 Rachel Sklar  highlights key trends, and especially the rise of curation and qualitative filters. Brilliant analysis:


"Audiences are done with SEO-baiting and bait-and-switch headlines; we’re going to get more choosy with our clicks. And with our eyeball-access. So you’d better be trustworthy, because I don’t let just anyone curate for me. Because while news will always be the killer app, who it’s delivered by will matter just as much."


Rachel also mentions that finding easily our communities of interests does not mean the end of exploration. Qualitative filters should provide exactly the opposite :


"While we’re opting to follow curators who deliver to us the news we wish to receive, our most trusted sites are automatically giving us what they think we want to see — or, taken dystopically, what they want us to see. Eli Pariser dubbed this “the Filter Bubble.” Things are only getting more customized, tailored, targeted, and algorithm-ized, but in 2012 we will see clear pushback on that."


Making the web more meaningful by connecting community of interests while encouraging discovery of  great content is truly the values Scoop.it encourages. Algorithms are cool. Humanrithm is definitely cooler



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Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 4, 2012 6:30 PM
This is an interesting answer to the claim that only print can save us from the filter bubble - that I disagreed with on http://www.scoop.it/t/web-content-digital-curation/p/918465429/if-you-choose-your-own-news-you-ll-be-less-well-read
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Or of Blogging period? - End of an Era: The Golden Age of Tech Blogging is Over

Or of Blogging period? - End of an Era: The Golden Age of Tech Blogging is Over | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Jeremiah Owyang makes a number of great observations in this post that he interprets as the end of the golden era of tech blogging. I strongly recommend reading it as it's indeed hard not to see a pattern after the sale of TechCrunch, of ReadWriteWeb or the departure of Ben Parr or Marshall Kirckpatrick.


Is this related to Tech only or is it a larger trend? Is blogging itself - and not just tech blogging - coming to an end?I think it's fair to say that a number of these observations are valid for the whole blogosphere: lack of attention span of readers, news and content remixing, fatigue of some personal brands, emergence of new business models, etc...


Blogging will not disappear but new forms of expression are definitely stealing the show from blogging platforms. Curation among them.

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Laura Brown's comment, January 17, 2012 10:12 PM
I don't see how blogging, or some form of self publishing, can disappear in favour of content curation. Curating content is not creating content. Someone still has to write and publish the content, in whatever format they use.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 17, 2012 11:37 PM
You're right, Laura. And I don't think anyone is saying blogging will disappear: just that its golden era might be over. Jeremiah made that point for Tech Blogging and I was thinking it could also be true for blogging in general.

I always felt curation and creation were complementing each other and you're right: without content, there's no point in curation. But while Blogging (and creation) used to be the only and thus the dominant form of self expression, it's no longer the case: users also express themselves by remixing content, curating stories or creating virtual pinboards.
Laura Brown's comment, January 17, 2012 11:51 PM
I posted that blogging needed a big change two years ago. It has become over commercial/ marketed. It has lost most of the charm it once had. I think the new blogging will be a lot more interactive. I read about gamifying a site/ blog. It makes a lot of sense but it needs work. If every WordPress blog runs the same gamification plugin they will all be equally bland and it won't work.
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If you choose your own news, you'll be less well read

If you choose your own news, you'll be less well read | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Peter Preston could have quoted Eli Pariser in this article as what he describes is in essence the filter bubble.


His point is that print gave us exposure to much more content than what we wanted; and that was good. It helped us discover and not just search. It confronted us to new thoughts and content we appreciated even though we weren't looking for it.


Though I agree with the risks described, Preston seems to think digital is to blame for that and that print is the only alternative. I beg to differ. There are many opportunities for discovery that already exist in the digital space and much more to develop. Social curation, in particular, has a great role to play to break the self-fulfilling prophecies of filtering algorithms.


To be wished for a great digital 2012?

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Critics of HuffPo news "theft" are missing the point

Critics of HuffPo news "theft" are missing the point | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"...aggregation of the kind the Huffington Post does is the way things work now, and complaining about it (or trying to sue over it, as the Hollywood gossip blogger Nikki Finke did earlier this year) is like complaining that since the car was invented, it has become really hard to find a good buggy whip. Your content will be aggregated, so the challenge , is to add more value than sites like the Huffington Post do. Publishers like the Herald might want to start with links...."


Very interesting blog post from Mathew Ingram, gigaOm's writer. Fighting against aggregation is not only a lost battle but also the wrong one. Aggregation is a natural evolution of the web, where a huge amount of content is produced every day. The next question is how to create more value that just collecting content from others. Curation will never be aggregation: it cannot be automatized and implies an angle, a unique point of view and choice you offer to your audience. There is no curation vs. creation debate. Seeing yourself as a trusty resource to point out the best sources just serves both of them.  A curator is by definition someone that respects not only his/her readers but the material/piece he/she works with and give access to. Aggregation comes from the latin word "aggregare", "add". The web is full. We do not need more adding.

Curation comes from "cura", meaning "to care". That will always be necessary. 

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Why Curation is the natural form of Mobile Publishing Scoop.it

Why Curation is the natural form of Mobile Publishing Scoop.it | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

For a long time, Mobile Internet was a “baby internet” as Steve Jobs called it, the day the iPhone was launched. The first smartphones were not very smart as they didn’t support “real” HTML browsing nor many of the Web technologies that made online experiences rich and useful. Obviously, the iPhone changed that and enabled a lot of these great Web experience to become mobile, on top of enabling the creation of many others. But one area that still struggles with mobile is content publishing. For content format that are by essence “mobile”, no problem: photos, short videos, tweets, position/check-ins, status updates… But so far, this has excluded any publishing activity involving long form / richer content, such as creating a story and updating a blog.


Curation is an opportunity to change that.


Here's why.


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The Content Curator is a sommelier + Robin Good's interview by Beth Kanter

The Content Curator is a sommelier + Robin Good's interview by Beth Kanter | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

This post sumarizes Beth Kanter's talk at the Social Media 4 Non Profits Conference.


Though the conference obviously focuses on NPO's, a lot of what's in there is generic enough so it's good reading, especially:

- Beth's slides 

- her interview with Robin 

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Beth Kanter's comment, January 30, 2012 10:49 PM
Thanks for the rescoop - learned a lot from Robin's talk
Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 30, 2012 10:52 PM
He's good, isn't he?
Beth Kanter's comment, January 31, 2012 8:12 AM
Thank you scooping my blog post and interview
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The Information Diet: Not Just A Book, A Movement For Conscious Consumption of Information

The Information Diet:  Not Just A Book, A Movement For Conscious Consumption of Information | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Beth Kanter has been at the forefront of social media usage for non-profits and as such an expert curator. She wrote an interesting review of the book "The Information Diet" which I published the teaser video of a few weeks ago.


As she points out, this is not an isolated piece but one that is related to other works to form a movement towards wider content consumption. A trend where curation has an essential role to play.


But as Brian Solis pointed out a few days ago, information overload has a lot of benefits too. Probably more so than inconvenients. So just like a culinary diet means better rather than less, this is all a question of balance as we should dread Information... Anorexia.

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Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 26, 2012 4:25 PM
Good point Otir, showing the cooking metaphor works pretty well :-)
Beth Kanter's comment, January 27, 2012 2:12 AM
Thanks so much for curating my review! I've incorporate the framing of Information Diet into my talks about curation. I've been emphasizing that it is workplace skill - not only to increase staff expertise, but the daily sharpening of the saw by slowing down and really doing good curation
Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 27, 2012 12:02 PM
Good point Beth: a lot still see curation as doing more (i.e. one more activity on top of the rest). While it's in fact about doing different.
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Is Curation the missing stack of the News-as-Data-Platform model?

Is Curation the missing stack of the News-as-Data-Platform model? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

A very good blog post by Felix Salmon on what technologists understand faster than journalists : the idea of "stack", the key to embrace the shift in media now :


"Technologists, on the other hand, intuitively understand the idea of “the stack”, which is the nerd version of “the platform” that all entrepreneurs and media gurus love to talk about incessantly. Essentially, they have spent their entire careers building things on other things. That happens in legacy media, too, sometimes: cable channels, for instance, live on a distribution platform owned by someone else. But print media in the US has historically been highly vertically integrated: the same company would create the content, edit it, print it, and distribute it directly to its customers’ front doors."


Mathew Ingram already warned media publishers with a similar thought: it's a data platform.


Now, when we think about these stacks, we feel they are not just creation + sharing. Yes, content creation is one stack and - as Dave Karp points out - it is synergetic with the sharing stack which amplifies it. But another stack is essential here: curation.


Curation is not just sharing but brings context and meaning. Isn't it the missing piece of the puzzle (or the missing stack) in social media thus far?

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Will iBooks Author be a professional or a mainstream publishing tool?

Will iBooks Author be a professional or a mainstream publishing tool? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

This is one of the first hands on reviews of Apple's new iBook publishing tool: iBooks Author. By Harrison Weber for TheNextWeb.


As he puts, Apple users - which are many in education, Apple's historical core segment - won't be surprised: "The app actually feels like I’ve used it before". But he also balances that by saying that "it’s easier than ever to create for iBooks, but everything is so customizable that it seems like a professional layout design may still be necessary." He also wonders about the target audience as the App was introduced as the authoring tool for TextBooks for iPads but clearly as a broader purpose: "Shorter books, in fact any sort of book other than a giant textbook, may be a better candidate for this app, which is why it’s interesting that Apple has focused so much on textbooks instead of every type of book."


Might be a good time to wake up the writer in all of us?



(If you haven't seen it yet, don't miss the beautiful TextBook introduction video by Apple)

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Why curators should care about SOPA/PIPA

Why curators should care about SOPA/PIPA | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Churchill used to say: “In England, everything is permitted, except that which is forbidden. In Germany, everything is forbidden, except that which is permitted. In France, everything is permitted even that which is forbidden. In the USSR, everything is forbidden, even that which is permitted.”


DMCA is England; the Movie Industry thinks it’s France and wants us to be in Germany but this could end up in the USSR.


More on why this matters for curators on the Scoop.it blog. Join the debate and make your voice heard!

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Social Ghosts

Social Ghosts | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

"Social ghosts are the shimmering images of potential customers. What to do - right - with social apparitions?"


This post captures two interesting ideas:


1. Social Media is this great opportunity with lots of potential customers. But it also both feels reachable while hard to grasp. Like catching a ghost, right?


2. The solution can not be in automating the process, which is a challenge for some taylorism-built large corporations.


Interesting to read. By Ross Quintana and curated by Saul Fleischman.

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OsakaSaul's comment, January 18, 2012 12:50 AM
thanks so much for taking this!
Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 18, 2012 2:00 PM
Thanks for suggesting it Saul! Welcome to the contributors of this topic!
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Why didn't Harry Potter just use Google?

Why didn't Harry Potter just use Google? | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it


Lisa Jardine explains that the fear of "information overload" was even present before the printing press : 


"..Even before the invention of the printing press - when the distribution of information depended upon teams of scribes working with pen and ink in monastery libraries -the fear of too much to know, too much material too widely and swiftly disseminated, was already threatening to overwhelm our orderly sense of understanding."


Curation is defined as the "topic of 2012". But it's actually very interesting to remember that this activity is as instinctive ( and old) as the transmission of knowledge in itself. And crucial to keep access to it years after years :


"there has never been a time when mastering the sum of human knowledge has not been felt to be an impossible task.And historically there was the additional fear that the precious store of knowledge accumulating as the world grew in wisdom might be lost by natural or man-made disaster."


The internet seems to be less vulnerable than paper and printed sources to face natural damage and keep information accessible, always available, as you cannot "loose" it. Just google it.

But the question isn't anymore to be scared to loose the information. But how to find the right one and help people to understand it as much as possible :


"The danger today is rather that we are reluctant to let go of any information garnered from however recondite a source. Every historian knows that no narrative will be intelligible to a reader if it includes all the detail the author amassed in the course of their research. A clear thread has to be teased from the mass of available evidence, to focus, direct and ultimately give meaning to what has been assembled for analysis"


Curation will not be a hot topic of 2012. It's a necessity to build a bright future : The curators who will help to contextualize and facilitate access to this huge amount of information will be the ones transmitting knowledge.


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ToKTutor's curator insight, February 22, 2015 11:21 AM

Title 6: Making sense of the world of accumulating knowledge & how to manage this effectively will need the ability to forget...

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You Can Now Embed a Tweet !

#protip Now you can embed a Tweet right on your WordPress blog, Posterous Space, or any website. Read more: https://t.co/WvDDXCMB
Jan 05 via webFavoriteRetweetReply

Pretty interesting to see how useful this will prove for curating tweets directly from permalinks. The end of screen capturing is over and this is good news for curators, isn't it? 


And cool to see it's working on Scoop.it very nicely :-)

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Serge Meunier's comment, January 6, 2012 3:23 PM
Speak french also, friend of the hexagon…
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The Interaction Between Publishing and Curation by @BradMays

The Interaction Between Publishing and Curation by @BradMays | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

Great picture tweeted by @BradMays, that describes instantly how curation and publishing are keys to drive engagement.

Brad Mays just wrote a great blog post about Scoop.it, focusing on the opportunity for brands to become trusted curators.

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The Rise Of The Digital Is Changing Just About Everything About Curation | David Weinberger

The Rise Of The Digital Is Changing Just About Everything About Curation | David Weinberger | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it

I re-scooped this from Giuseppe Mauriello as I felt the somehow inconclusive conclusion was very close to what I personally felt: yes, curation is changing and digital curation will not be the same as it used to be pre-digital.

 

Bottom line is we need to be prepared to live with softer boundaries than before of what is good and what isn't.

 

I've had interesting discussions on this before and I've heard several say they felt the need for new gatekeepers to be established or recognized. It's the curating the curators debate. While there are certainly opportunities to shine and be recognized as thought leaders and master curators, I don't think the digital revolution means we're going to replace old gatekeepers by new ones. It is much more that there won't be any more gates, ergo no gatekeepers at all. We'll all have to learn and educate at the same time on what makes good from bad curation. And when it comes to deciging who's to trust and who isn't, the jury will be always on. Just like we now are.

 

(David Weinberger is a fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society)


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 2, 2012 10:50 AM
Yes, curation is changing and digital curation will not be the same as it used to be in pre-digital. We need to be prepared with softer boundaries than before of what is good and what isn't.

Thanks for sharing.
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, January 2, 2012 10:54 AM
Hi Guillaume,
I totally agree with your comment. Thanks for appreciation my curated article.
Wishing to all you and your loved ones, Happy New Year!
Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 2, 2012 10:56 AM
Thanks! I wish you a happy new year as well! 2012 is going to be exciting.
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6 Game-Changing Digital Journalism Events of 2011

6 Game-Changing Digital Journalism Events of 2011 | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it
Journalism and publishing kept being reshaped in 2011. Here's an interesting recap by Meghan Peters on Mashable of the major changes that occurred this ending year. Will Curation be the major one for 2012?
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Vadim Lavrusik: Curation and amplification will become much more sophisticated in 2012

Vadim Lavrusik: Curation and amplification will become much more sophisticated in 2012 | Curation & The Future of Publishing | Scoop.it
Vadim is the Journalist Program Manager at Facebook and he makes interesting points among

which I'd emphasize a couple:

1. Role of journalists will evolve towards fact checking and curation: rather than originate stories, they can now tap in social media powered citizen journalists and become effective curators. Something Andy Carvin at NPR pioneered brilliantly.

2. Curation mindset itself has to evolve and a stronger emphasis needs to be put on distribution and post-production. How stories will look, live and be evolves after they are publish is important.
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