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Strategy, not Technology, Drives Digital Transformation

Strategy, not Technology, Drives Digital Transformation | Web | Scoop.it
“The ability to digitally reimagine the business is determined in large part by a clear digital strategy supported by leaders who foster a culture able to change and invent the new. While these insights are consistent with prior technology evolutions, what is unique to digital transformation is that risk taking is becoming a cultural norm as more digitally advanced companies seek new levels of competitive advantage. Equally important, employees across all age groups want to work for businesses that are deeply committed to digital progress. Company leaders need to bear this in mind in order to attract and retain the best talent.”
Via Don Dea
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Cockroach Theory- A beautiful speech by Sundar Pichai.

Cockroach Theory-  A beautiful speech by Sundar Pichai. | Web | Scoop.it

A beautiful speech by Sundar Pichai - an IIT-MIT Alumnus and Global Head Google Chrome:

The cockroach theory for self development

At a restaurant, a cockroach suddenly flew from somewhere and sat on a lady.

She started screaming out of fear.

With a panic stricken face and trembling voice, she started jumping, with both her hands desperately trying to get rid of the cockroach.

Her reaction was contagious, as everyone in her group also got panicky.

The lady finally managed to push the cockroach away but ...it landed on another lady in the group.

Now, it was the turn of the other lady in the group to continue the drama.

The waiter rushed forward to their rescue.

In the relay of throwing, the cockroach next fell upon the waiter.

The waiter stood firm, composed himself and observed the behavior of the cockroach on his shirt.

When he was confident enough, he grabbed it with his fingers and threw it out of the restaurant.

Sipping my coffee and watching the amusement, the antenna of my mind picked up a few thoughts and started wondering, was the cockroach responsible for their histrionic behavior?

If so, then why was the waiter not disturbed?

He handled it near to perfection, without any chaos.

It is not the cockroach, but the inability of those people to handle the disturbance caused by the cockroach, that disturbed the ladies.

I realized that, it is not the shouting of my father or my boss or my wife that disturbs me, but it's my inability to handle the disturbances caused by their shouting that disturbs me.

It's not the traffic jams on the road that disturbs me, but my inability to handle the disturbance caused by the traffic jam that disturbs me.

More than the problem, it's my reaction to the problem that creates chaos in my life.

Lessons learnt from the story:

I understood, I should not react in life.I should always respond.

The women reacted, whereas the waiter responded.

Reactions are always instinctive whereas responses are always well thought of.

A beautiful way to understand............LIFE.

Person who is HAPPY is not because Everything is RIGHT in his Life..

He is HAPPY because his Attitude towards Everything in his Life is Right..!!


Via Linda Holroyd
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Linda Holroyd's curator insight, August 21, 2015 12:42 PM

Cockroaches will sometimes appear - how will YOU respond when you encounter one?

Mohit Shetty's curator insight, September 2, 2015 4:32 AM

Lovely read

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Innovation Requires Experimentation

“Boosting your potential for innovationIf you want to boost your potential for innovation through experimentation, Clayton Christensen suggests three useful ways;Try out new experiences through exploration such as living in a different country, working in multiple industries or developing a new skill.Take apart products, process and ideas.Test ideas through pilots and prototypes.”
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Et voici le portrait robot du consommateur collaboratif et scénarios de prospective #economie

Et voici le portrait robot du consommateur collaboratif et scénarios de prospective #economie | Web | Scoop.it
“OuiShare et la Fing viennent de publier les résultats de Sharevolution, une enquête d'un an portant sur plus de 2 000 consommateurs collaboratifs français.”

et CINQ SCÉNARIOS DE PROSPECTIVEEt demain, serons-nous tous des « partageux » ? La FING et OuiShare a imaginé cinq scénarios complémentaires de l’évolution de l’économie collaborative :


Via CCI Alsace, Somme éco-activités, La Métropole de Lyon- M3
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sicoval's curator insight, April 8, 2015 10:49 AM

Œuvrons pour que l'offre réponde à cette demande.

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Agile Change is Coming

Agile Change is Coming | Web | Scoop.it
“How fast is your organization capable of changing to continue to remain relevant and successful in the marketplace?The world is changing at an accelerating pace as new technologies are discovered, developed, released and adopted by consumers faster than ever before. At the same time companies are rising to global scale faster and large, successful companies are disappearing faster too.”
Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:25 AM

In this new reality that we all face, organizations of all types are going to need to:

  • Change how they change
  • Increase their organizational agility
  • Increase the flexibility of the organization
  • Become capable of continuous change
  • Inhibit the appearance and/or growth of change gaps that can doom your company

It is because of this tidal wave of change and a recognition that there is a need in the marketplace for more human change processes and tools that make change seem less overwhelming, that my next book for Palgrave Macmillan will focus on the best practices and next practices of organizational change (aka change management), and I’ve developed a new collaborative, visual change planning toolkit to go with it (but more about that later).

One way to do all of the items in the bulleted list above is to take more of an agile approach to change, to adopt some of the values and principles of the Agile Software Development methodology and use those to create a set of what could be described as Agile behaviors within the organization. If you are not familiar with the Agile Software Development methodology, I have included below the Agile Software Development Manifesto from http://agilemanifesto.org that details the values and principles of Agile Software Development. As you read through the manifesto I hope you’ll see that the values and principles can easily be applied to other endeavors outside of software development, whether that might in the project management discipline of your organization, or within your larger change initiatives.

- See more at: http://www.innovationexcellence.com/blog/2015/01/18/agile-change-is-coming/#sthash.Za2K7nXs.dpuf

eric bertrand's curator insight, March 14, 2015 12:22 PM

knowledge about change management can help logistics too.

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8 New Rules Of Public Speaking

“POWERFUL COMMUNICATION IS NO LONGER THE FORMALIZED RITUAL IT USED TO BE”
Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, August 27, 2015 1:03 AM
1. PRACTICE DOESN'T MAKE PERFECT

Yes, you read that right. Forget what you learned in grammar school: Practice doesn’t always make perfect. Practice with feedback does.

Just doing something over and over again won't necessarily lead you to do it well. You need to learn how to be self-critical about what you're spending all that time practicing, then make adjustments accordingly

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Smart People Never Make These Mistakes Twice

Smart People Never Make These Mistakes Twice | Web | Scoop.it
“Everybody makes mistakes—that’s a given—but not everyone learns from them. Some people make the same mistakes over and over again, fail to make any real progress, and can’t figure out why.“Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them.” – Bruce LeeWhen we make mistakes, it can be hard to admit them because doing so feels like an attack on our self-worth. This tendency poses a huge problem because new research proves something that commonsense has told us for a very long time—fully acknowledging and embracing errors is the only way to avoid repeating them.Yet, many of us still struggle with this.Researchers from the Clinical Psychophysiology Lab at Michigan State University found that people fall into one of two camps when it comes to mistakes: those who have a fixed mind-set (“Forget this; I’ll never be good at it”) and those who have a growth mind-set (“What a wake-up call! Let’s see what I did wrong so I won’t do it again”)."By paying attention to mistakes, we invest more time and effort to correct them," says study author Jason Moser. "The result is that you make the mistake work for you."Those with a growth mind-set land on their feet because they acknowledge their mistakes and use them to get better. Those with a fixed mind-set are bound to repeat their mistakes because they try their best to ignore them.Smart, successful people are by no means immune to making mistakes; they simply have the tools in place to learn from their errors. In other words, they recognize the roots of their mix-ups quickly and never make the same mistake twice.“When you repeat a mistake it is not a mistake anymore: it is a decision.” – Paulo CoelhoSome mistakes are so tempting that we all make them at one point or another. Here are 10 mistakes almost all of us make, but smart people only make once.#1 - Believing in someone or something that’s too good to be true. Some people are so charismatic and so confident that it can be tempting to follow anything they say. They speak endlessly of how successful their businesses are, how well liked they are, who they know, and how many opportunities they can offer you. While it’s, of course, true that some people really are successful and really want to help you, smart people only need to be tricked once before they start to think twice about a deal that sounds too good to be true. The results of naivety and a lack of due diligence can be catastrophic. Smart people ask serious questions before getting involved because they realize that no one, themselves included, are as good as they look.#2 - Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Albert Einstein said that insanity is doing the same thing and expecting a different result. Despite his popularity and cutting insight, there are a lot of people who seem determined that two plus two will eventually equal five. Smart people, on the other hand, need only experience this frustration once. The fact is simple: if you keep the same approach, you’ll keep getting the same results, no matter how much you hope for the opposite. Smart people know that if they want a different result, they need to change their approach, even when it’s painful to do so.#3 - Failing to delay gratification. We live in a world where books instantly appear on our e-readers, news travels far and wide, and just about anything can show up at our doorsteps in as little as a day. Smart people know that gratification doesn’t come quickly and hard work comes long before the reward. They also know how to use this as motivation through every step of the arduous process that amounts to success because they’ve felt the pain and disappointment that come with selling themselves short.#4 - Operating without a budget.You can’t experience financial freedom until you operate under the constraint of a budget. Sticking to a budget, personally and professionally, forces us to make thoughtful choices about what we want and need. Smart people only have to face that insurmountable pile of bills once before getting their act together, starting with a thorough reckoning as to where their money is going. They realize that once you understand how much you’re spending and what you’re spending it on, the right choices become clear. A morning latte is a lot less tempting when you’re aware of the cost: $1,000 on average per year. Having a budget isn’t only about making sure that you have enough to pay the bills; smart people know that making and sticking to a strict budget means never having to pass up an opportunity because they’ve blown their precious capital on discretionary expenditures. Budgets establish discipline, and discipline is the foundation of quality work.#5 - Losing sight of the big picture. It’s so easy to become head-down busy, working so hard on what’s right in front of you that you lose sight of the big picture. But smart people learn how to keep this in check by weighing their daily priorities against a carefully calculated goal. It’s not that they don’t care about small-scale work, they just have the discipline and perspective to adjust their course as necessary. Life is all about the big picture, and when you lose sight of it, everything suffers.#6 - Not doing your homework. Everybody’s taken a shortcut at some point, whether it was copying a friend’s biology assignment or strolling into an important meeting unprepared. Smart people realize that while they may occasionally get lucky, that approach will hold them back from achieving their full potential. They don’t take chances, and they understand that there’s no substitute for hard work and due diligence. They know that if they don’t do their homework, they’ll never learn anything—and that’s a surefire way to bring your career to a screeching halt.#7 - Trying to be someone or something you’re not. It’s tempting to try to please people by being whom they want you to be, but no one likes a fake, and trying to be someone you’re not never ends well. Smart people figure that out the first time they get called out for being a phony, forget their lines, or drop out of character. Other people never seem to realize that everyone else can see right through their act. They don’t recognize the relationships they’ve damaged, the jobs they’ve lost, and the opportunities they’ve missed as a result of trying to be someone they’re not. Smart people, on the other hand, make that connection right away and realize that happiness and success demand authenticity.#8 - Trying to please everyone.Almost everyone makes this mistake at some point, but smart people realize quickly that it’s simply impossible to please everybody and trying to please everyone pleases no one. Smart people know that in order to be effective, you have to develop the courage to call the shots and to make the choices that you feel are right (not the choices that everyone will like).#9 - Playing the victim. News reports and our social media feeds are filled with stories of people who seem to get ahead by playing the victim. Smart people may try it once, but they realize quickly that it’s a form of manipulation and that any benefits will come to a screeching halt as soon as people see that it’s a game. But there’s a more subtle aspect of this strategy that only truly smart people grasp: to play the victim, you have to give up your power, and you can’t put a price on that.#10 - Trying to change someone. The only way that people change is through the desire and wherewithal to change themselves. Still, it’s tempting to try to change someone who doesn’t want to change, as if your sheer will and desire for them to improve will change them (as it has you). Some even actively choose people with problems, thinking that they can “fix” them. Smart people may make that mistake once, but then they realize that they’ll never be able to change anyone but themselves. Instead, they build their lives around genuine, positive people and work to avoid problematic people that bring them down.Bringing it all togetherEmotionally intelligent people are successful because they never stop learning. They learn from their mistakes, they learn from their successes, and they’re always changing themselves for the better.Do you operate from a growth mind-set or a fixed mind-set? What other mistakes do smart people never make twice? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.”
Via Linda Holroyd
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Linda Holroyd's curator insight, August 21, 2015 12:44 PM

Pride yourself on making original mistakes for the right reason

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Conférence de André Comte-Sponville, Sens du Travail, Bonheur et Motivation - YouTube

“ Conférence de rentrée Audencia Grande Ecole (2011) - André Comte-Sponville Thème : Sens du Travail, Bonheur et Motivation”
Via Virginie Walfard, Nicolas Dortindeguey
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Virginie Walfard's curator insight, January 14, 2015 9:02 AM

La valeur travail n'existe pas | Le rôle du manager/leader est de motiver

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» Demain, la ville collaborative

» Demain, la ville collaborative | Web | Scoop.it
Cela n’aura échappé à personne : depuis quelques années, le numérique vient chambouler la manière que nous avons de fabriquer nos villes. L’une des évolutions les plus saillantes, et peut-être la plus influente pour les citadins, réside dans l’émergence d’un urbanisme dit “collaboratif”. Un terme porteur de nombreuses applications concrètes, mais qui revêt aussi sa part de chimères. Construire la ville avec – et par – ses habitants, une utopie pragmatique ?
Via La Métropole de Lyon- M3
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How the Cloud is Changing the Role of Technology Leaders

How the Cloud is Changing the Role of Technology Leaders | Web | Scoop.it
“CTOs Must Develop Better Business SenseTraditionally, the CIO and CTO selected applications and deployed them. Users had to accept what the business gave them.Thanks to the cloud, consumerization and mobile technology all working together, users now feel empowered to pick what they want, such as bringing their own devices to work.If a company’s IT department is not capable of moving fast enough, any other department now can go online, find a software-as-a-service application and provision that application themselves relatively easily. Then the C-level technical executive and his staff are left to figure out how to manage all of these new demands and devices, and monitor and maintain the user-provided infrastructure.”
Via Don Dea
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William Henderson's curator insight, March 16, 2015 9:56 AM

Shadow IT...BYOD...How to manage external cloud services and internally developed solutions...These are just some of the daily challenges that face a CIO. Their world is changing very quickly. Will they adapt ?

"Organizations with strategically minded CIOs or CTOs will flourish. Those with CIOs or CTOs content to wait for direction from other executive level colleagues will be doomed to lag behind in their industries."

William Henderson's curator insight, March 16, 2015 9:58 AM

Shadow IT...BYOD...How to manage external cloud services and internally developed solutions...These are just some of the daily challenges that face a CIO. Their world is changing very quickly. Will they adapt ?

"Organizations with strategically minded CIOs or CTOs will flourish. Those with CIOs or CTOs content to wait for direction from other executive level colleagues will be doomed to lag behind in their industries."