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Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous

Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous | technologies | Scoop.it

The buzz is that Google Glass will transform medicine.  But unless it’s carefully vetted it could be a disaster for patients, clinicians and hospitals.  Until the FDA or research confirms its safety, Google Glass is banned from my clinic as a privacy and medical practice hazard.

 

Here are four reasons why:

 

1.  Privacy violations. Google Glass make it extremely easy to take pictures or video of someone without permission.  Congress has already raised concerns about Google’s unwillingness to ensure privacy protection for non-users in the general public.   The bar should be higher in medicine than the general public.  

 

2.  Hackable. Even if used responsibly by clinicians, that doesn’t mean patients and medical practices aren’t at risk of privacy violations and abuse.  Computers can be hacked; remote access software can allow someone to film/photograph without the users’ knowledge. 

 

3.  Safety concerns with multitasking. Privacy concerns aside, the promise of be able to do more in medicine doesn’t mean we do it better.  There have been recent concerns about “distracted doctors” with too much technology to focus on the task at hand.  To make it worse, doctors may think multitasking improves performance when it actually worsens it.  Some of the decreased performance may lessen with experience, but that means potential distractions like Google Glass may require some formal training before routine use in clinic.

 

4.  Google’s And medicine’s goals aren’t aligned. “Don’t be evil” sounds like it might fit with medicine.  But increasingly Google seems to apply this stated credo to its customers rather than itself.

 


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First American Surgery Transmitted Live Via Google Glass

First American Surgery Transmitted Live Via Google Glass | technologies | Scoop.it

A surgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is the first in the United States to consult with a distant colleague using live, point-of-view video from the operating room via Google Glass, a head-mounted computer and camera device.

 

“It’s a privilege to be a part of this project as we explore how this exciting new technology might be incorporated into the everyday care of our patients,” said Dr. Christopher Kaeding, the physician who performed the surgery and director of sports medicine at Ohio State.  “To be honest, once we got into the surgery, I often forgot the device was there. It just seemed very intuitive and fit seamlessly.”

 

Google Glass has a frame similar to traditional glasses, but instead of lenses, there is a small glass block that sits above the right eye.  On that glass is a computer screen that, with a simple voice command, allows users to pull up information as they would on any other computer.  Attached to the front of the device is a camera that offers a point-of-view image and the ability to take both photos and videos while the device is worn.

 

During this procedure at the medical center’s University East facility, Kaeding wore the device as he performed ACL surgery on Paula Kobalka, 47, from Westerville, Ohio, who hurt her knee playing softball.  As he performed her operation at a facility on the east side of Columbus, Google Glass showed his vantage point via the internet to audiences miles away.

 

Across town, one of Kaeding’s Ohio State colleagues, Dr. Robert Magnussen, watched the surgery his office, while on the main campus, several students at The Ohio State University College of Medicine watched on their laptops.

 

“To have the opportunity to be a medical student and share in this technology is really exciting,” said Ryan Blackwell, a second-year medical student who watched the surgery remotely.   “This could have huge implications, not only from the medical education perspective, but because a doctor can use this technology remotely, it could spread patient care all over the world in places that we don’t have it already.”

 

“As an academic medical center, we’re very excited about the opportunities this device could provide for education,” said Dr. Clay Marsh, chief innovation officer at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “But beyond, that, it could be a game-changer for the doctor during the surgery itself.”

 

Experts have theorized that during surgery doctors could use voice commands to instantly call up x-ray or MRI images of their patient, pathology reports or reference materials.  They could collaborate live and face-to-face with colleagues via the internet, anywhere in the world.

 

“It puts you right there, real time,” said Marsh, who is also the executive director of the Center for Personalized Health Care at Ohio State. “Not only might you be able to call up any kind of information you need or to get the help you need, but it’s the ability to do it immediately that’s so exciting,” he said.  “Now, we just have to start using it. Like many technologies, it needs to be evaluated in different situations to find out where the greatest value is and how it can impact the lives of our patients in a positive way.”

 

Only 1,000 people in the United States have been chosen to test Google Glass as part of Google’s Explorer Program. Dr. Ismail Nabeel, an assistant professor of general internal medicine at Ohio State applied and was chosen. He then partnered with Kaeding to perform this groundbreaking surgery and to help test technology that could change the way we see medicine in the future.


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Zane's curator insight, September 3, 2013 11:44 PM

This one is absolutely amazing! 

Dane MillerHass's comment, September 5, 2013 9:26 PM
Super cool, we are developing great things!
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Why would Apple add a fingerprint sensor to the iPhone?

Why would Apple add a fingerprint sensor to the iPhone? | technologies | Scoop.it

Incorporating a fingerprint sensor on the iPhone could change the way we access everything from Twitter to our bank accounts. And it could make our devices a lot less interesting to would-be thieves.


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pankajrane750's comment, August 22, 2013 7:16 AM
I like security, It is safe side for me.
Jill Woods's comment, August 23, 2013 7:31 AM
Love the idea of this
Olivier Aidyn's comment, August 23, 2013 7:59 AM
Yes you are very true, perfect authentication
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Official Apple Store - iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPad, MacBook Pro, and more

Official Apple Store - iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPad, MacBook Pro, and more | technologies | Scoop.it
Get fast, free shipping on orders over $50 or buy online and pick up at a local Apple Retail Store. Add a free personal laser engraved message to iPad, iPad mini, or iPod when you buy from the Apple Online Store.

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10 Ingenious Inventions for People With Disabilities

10 Ingenious Inventions for People With Disabilities | technologies | Scoop.it
These adaptive devices help improve the lives of people living with disabilities, and they illustrate how far assistive tech has come.

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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, September 13, 2013 9:17 AM

Fascinating and useful developments, but this is worth looking at for the Dynavox Eyemax alone.  The ability to successfully communicate must lift a great burden off those unable to articulate or gesture their needs.

robyns tut's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:54 AM

This shows hoe growing technology increases to help people with and without disabilities. Compared to Rhodes that has limited access and help for the dissabled, these inventions offer great support overcoming these obstacles. A story can be done on why these objects are not made readily available to more disabled people.

 

-Tanah Rigney 

bancoideas's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:01 AM

La creatividad no tiene límites y además permite romper con algunos!

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EmoPulse Smile: A Bracelet Smartwatch Jam-Packed With Useful Features

EmoPulse Smile: A Bracelet Smartwatch Jam-Packed With Useful Features | technologies | Scoop.it
There are a lot of technology companies announcing their own innovative smartwatch right now, but are they as innovative as the EmoPulse Smile smartwatch?

Via Tiaan Jonker
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Richard Platt's curator insight, September 17, 2013 10:52 AM

Everyone is getting in on the act of wearable technology

rrenny's curator insight, September 18, 2013 4:09 AM

nice 

Alex Simon's curator insight, September 18, 2013 6:00 PM

I love technology!

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Google’s browser becomes a true platform with today’s launch of Chrome Apps

Google’s browser becomes a true platform with today’s launch of Chrome Apps | technologies | Scoop.it
Google has announced the launch of Chrome Apps today in a bid to establish the Web browser as more of a platform in itself.

The new apps are similar to what the Chrome Web Store ...

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sarabruce's curator insight, September 6, 2013 3:10 AM

Intersting news

Raphael Izuu Utokanandu's curator insight, September 6, 2013 8:38 AM

i had not been friendly with google chrome.i loved the attached applications but it has been unfunctional to me even after i had down loaded it

 

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How Technology Has Changed Our Idea of ‘Knowledge,’ and What This Means for Schools

How Technology Has Changed Our Idea of ‘Knowledge,’ and What This Means for Schools | technologies | Scoop.it

The fact that knowledge is no longer fixed, but constantly evolving, and the speed at which new knowledge appears online have contributed to our sense of “information overload,” Weinberger said. And that leads to another way that our evolving sense of knowledge is transforming how we learn: We must learn to accept that true mastery is impossible.


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Diana Montes's curator insight, September 9, 2013 2:18 PM

Conocimiento = adapatación, interesante artículo.

Hein Holthuizen's curator insight, September 22, 2013 2:49 PM

redefine  true mastery

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Wii: A Game Changer for Maine Hospitals

Wii: A Game Changer for Maine Hospitals | technologies | Scoop.it

A number of hospitals around Maine are using Nintendo Wii in their physical and occupational therapy programs.


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Josué Cardona's curator insight, August 1, 2013 11:04 PM

This articles has a few stories of different hospitals in the area using Wiis and the patients who benefited from them.

Kirsten Milliken's comment, August 6, 2013 5:39 AM
WHo knew? In my own backyard!
Laura Wiesner's curator insight, November 8, 2013 8:12 PM

This article is talking about how the nintendo wii is able to help childred with physical therapy. Certain games can help with certai issues, just like the fishing game that was mentioned in the article. My question is that did nintendo wii do this on purpose knowing that this would be beneficial, or was it discovered. Now that wiki has been informed about this, will they specialize in games that will aid in physical therapy? Now will other gaming devices try to invent games to help with this issue?