Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind | MIT Technology Review

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind | MIT Technology Review | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
arxiv.org/abs/1506.03022
BeerBergman's insight:

"Two versions of this setup are shown above. In the left-hand example, the uncolored nodes see more than half of their neighbors as colored. In the right-hand example, this is not true for any of the uncolored nodes.

But here’s the thing: the structure of the network is the same in both cases. The only thing that changes is the nodes that are colored.  

This is the majority illusion—the local impression that a specific attribute is common when the global truth is entirely different."

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BeerBergman's comment, July 5, 2015 4:49 PM
And the original case can be found here : http://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.03022v1.pdf
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Who invented the World Wide Web and the Internet? » Sociology Lens

Who invented the World Wide Web and the Internet? » Sociology Lens | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Examining their claims to fame is not an attempt to debunk these men’s status: it’s an exercise to show that technology never emerges in isolation. The sociology of technology tells us the invention and development of the Web and the Internet, like all technology, has to be understood within a broader social context that involves networks of people and technology as well as cultural values. I can’t do this statement justice here. By applying this logic to these t-shirts in the picture above I can, however, begin to show the value of the sociology of technology.
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Digital Identities: Social Networks & Me

Digital Identities: Social Networks & Me | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Retranscription of a lecture in the Distinguished Lecture Series at Sciences Po Paris (October 2014).
BeerBergman's insight:

DLS published a great resumé of my lecture, that I take the liberty to share with you:


"Is the online me the real me or the fake me? On the 1st of October, Beer Bergman shared her views about the world we live in today, where social networking and digital identity creating are sometimes essential. She raised questions about the importance and the accuracy of selfies and avatars; how do they represent us? Are they authentic or only masks? Why do we need to “practice smiling”? What about the issue of sociability or “éxtimité”? In general, we have three profiles: professional, intimate and public, and they constitute a “multiple quest for identity”. She considers the “me” as a collection: of traces, of persons…And often, the management of one’s profile is dealt with as a real business. Finally, she mentioned the problems of ethics in social media, which are often questioned. Social media may have to be rethought and morality to be developed. But, as she pointed out, there is “no need to say that it is a good thing or a bad thing. It’s the world we live in."

http://distinguishedseries.com/2014/10/04/digital-identities-social-networks-and-me/


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Réduire la consommation grâce à l’économie du partage | Forum Vies Mobiles

Réduire la consommation grâce à l’économie du partage | Forum Vies Mobiles | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Forum Vies Mobiles
BeerBergman's insight:

Paula Bialski on the sharing economy

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How Social Media Silences Debate

How Social Media Silences Debate | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
People have always tended to surround themselves with like-minded people, but the Internet makes doing so easier than ever before, a study finds.
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting, not surprising: will time teach us to be different in the future or are social organization and norms universal and reluctant to change? Excerpt.

***

"The Internet, it seems, is contributing to the polarization of America, as people surround themselves with people who think like them and hesitate to say anything different. Internet companies magnify the effect, by tweaking their algorithms to show us more content from people who are similar to us.

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A Brief Primer on Human Social Networks, or How to Keep $16 Billion In Your Pocket

A Brief Primer on Human Social Networks, or How to Keep $16 Billion In Your Pocket | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
1. Listen to social scientists. 2. Don’t reinvent sociology 101. 3. … 4. Keep $16 billion in your pocket
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting introduction to the basics of Social Sciences. I am not sure though, whether I share the conclusion : I bet that Facebook thought "hé, people are interacting on different levels, let's get that app". Not in the least because of the fact that WhatsApp doesn't guarantee privacy settings outside the US and collects extensive information about all your contacts, even those who are NOT on WhatsApp. Might have been a bright move, but time will tell.

Excerpt.

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"What this person is getting at is that our communication needs change depending on the type of tie. An engagement or a new baby may well be best announced to a large group of weaker ties, whereas most day-to-day conversation is carried out with our smaller, primary social networks. (Yep, Facebook newsfeed versus WhatsApp). This is not an either/or statement. Both types of conversations and interactions are primal, important and central to human social interaction."

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Design and Ethics: Reflections on Practice | MichaelZimmer.org

Design and Ethics: Reflections on Practice | MichaelZimmer.org | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

This 

BeerBergman's insight:

Not recent, but it seems an interesting book, on an ever important subject: the relationship between design, practice and ethics. 

Excerpt.

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"Approaches to design recognise design as a practice that can transform human experience and understanding, expanding its role beyond stylistic enhancement. The traditional roles of design, designer and designed object are therefore redefined through new understanding of the relationship between the material and immaterial aspects of design where the design product and the design process are embodiments of ideas, values and beliefs."

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The Documented Life

We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them.
BeerBergman's insight:

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

***

"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

***

"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 12, 2014 6:07 PM

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

***

"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

***

"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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David Riesman and the Lonely Crowd of Social Media

David Riesman and the Lonely Crowd of Social Media | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
What can a more-than-60-year-old book tell us about Twitter and Facebook?
BeerBergman's insight:

An absolutely must-read. Excerpt. And don't forget to order the original book :-).

***

"AS RIESMAN STATES IN The Lonely Crowd, modes of conformity have always existed, and there's nothing inherently wrong with their existence. Kings have employed soldiers and parents have revoked desserts to ensure that their underlings stay in line. But young people today have tools of expression unimaginable to people a century ago. The power and responsibility held by practically anyone with an Internet connection can often be great.

What Riesman did argue for was autonomy. He urged individuals to find "the nerve to be oneself when that self is not approved of by the dominant ethic of a society." In the final pages of The Lonely Crowd, Riesman describes "the autonomous" as "those who on the whole are capable of conforming to the behavioral norms of their society … but are free to choose whether to conform or not.""

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Who invented the World Wide Web and the Internet? » Sociology Lens

Who invented the World Wide Web and the Internet? » Sociology Lens | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

"Examining their claims to fame is not an attempt to debunk these men’s status: it’s an exercise to show that technology never emerges in isolation. The sociology of technology tells us the invention and development of the Web and the Internet, like all technology, has to be understood within a broader social context that involves networks of people and technology as well as cultural values. I can’t do this statement justice here. By applying this logic to these t-shirts in the picture above I can, however, begin to show the value of the sociology of technology.

BeerBergman's insight:

Saturday night reading :-).

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The place of sociology in the Second Machine Age

The place of sociology in the Second Machine Age | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

≠We’ve recently seen an emerging discourse of the ‘second machine age’ considering the potential implications of advances in robots and computational technologies for employment. In a recent London ...


Via CECI Jean-François
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An Experiment In Common Courtesy In The Age Of Google Glass Everywhere

An Experiment In Common Courtesy In The Age Of Google Glass Everywhere | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The questions matter today. Because even if you are taking a photo and it stays “private,” if hackers can tap the iCloud and leak nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence, we have to be concerned about the photos we take--not just the ones that we share.
BeerBergman's insight:

Et la ressource originale en anglais :-).

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Why the web isn’t as meritocratic as you think

Social media may be easy to access, but communicating with people via social media isn’t always as easy as it might seem. Posting content online isn’t the same as getting it in front of them. It may be public, but a lot of effort is still needed to publicize what you post. In theory, social […]
BeerBergman's insight:

Old news, but well told story :-). Excerpt.

***

"People’s experience of social media varies widely, depending heavily on how the people around them use these services. Most people don’t follow strangers randomly; they follow people they know, respect or are curious about. Because of countless historical reasons, people’s personal networks are shaped by race, class, religion, geography and language. This gets reproduced online and is often referred to as the “filter bubble”. As a result, just because people are all on one social media site together does not mean that they are exposed to each other’s content. How you see Instagram, the photo sharing service, is fundamentally different than how I see Instagram because we inevitably follow different people."

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The Real Victims of Journal Paywalls » Cyborgology

The Real Victims of Journal Paywalls » Cyborgology | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

I recently posted an article on an ongoing debate of why scientific writing is so unreadable and will add another piece of information I found online: Jenny Davis' article on free access to scientific material. 

***

I actually am in one of the positions mentionedin the article: I consider myself an independent, non-trained (autodidact) professionnel, teaching classins outside University and sometimes a few hours at University.

I spend about 2 000 € per year on the purchase of books, to constitute a library around my subjects, and am not eager to add quite high costs on academic journals and libraries to that amount. Add to this the quite expensive books in some 'niche' sujects, like anthropology/tourism studies, and yes, I feel frustrated. MOOCS and other online training courses, give you access to scientific approaches, studying online (blogs, articles, debates) can do some of the rest - the missing part of journals becomes more and more evident when you advance in your research.

***

With the changes in formal training programs and education ideology, brought about by technology and changing ideas about access to information and training opportunities, access to these resources is going to be an important part for disclosure without constraint. The scientific community will probably discover more and more professionals capable of adding insights and analysis to their practices.

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Another Facebook Exec Talks About Privacy; Another Set of Gross Misunderstandings | MichaelZimmer.org

Another Facebook Exec Talks About Privacy; Another Set of Gross Misunderstandings | MichaelZimmer.org | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Since I am in the middle of an amount of articles about Facebook and privacy, let's include this one to the collection :-).

***

The ever again strking aspect of this type of debate seems to me that Facebook is claimed by users (and critics) to make it the service they would like it to be. Don't get me wrong: I do fully subscribe to the fact that there are critics to the model, and am glad the debates don't slow down because I think it is important for deep thinking about technology and human interaction. But somehow it seems important to recall from time to time that we are talking here about a company, not a public service, with a vision, that we may or may not share. 

***

Another aspect that strikes me is that the critics are mainly "auto-centered": concerned with what other will or may not see of them. Very few stress the fact that human (inter-)action serves (different) purposes and that we do need the other(s) to react to us. Disclosure on whatever scale is important with regards to the purposes of the action. The stress on"disclosure control" may obscure the expected purposes that everyone has. 

Excerpt.

***

"This is perhaps the most striking example of Facebook’s utter failure to understand how privacy works. I’ll grant that it is easier to find people if this information is public. And I’ll grant that many people will have a “less satisfying experience” if they don’t post photos or make connections. But, again, people used to have that choice. They could choose what to post to their profile and who can access it — they had control.

Now, it is all public. And if you have a problem with that, Facebook’s only response is essentially “don’t share it”.

To Facebook, privacy and control of information is a binary: either you share it with everyone, or you don’t share it at all. There’s no longer any space between these two poles, no way to control how these pieces of personal information are visible."

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Facebook's Zuckerberg: "Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity" | MichaelZimmer.org

Facebook's Zuckerberg: "Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity" | MichaelZimmer.org | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

Interesting article about the integrity of people claiming more than one personality, as put by the writer as a comment on a statement by Zuckerberg.

***

I fully understand the authors point of view, all but one : Zuckerberg never said you had to publish everything visible to everybody. Facebook's structure allows you to swift from one context to another, displaying different personal and corporate information to different sets of people. Basically it comes down to one person, different contexts, differents information flows. Correct me if I am wrong!

Excerpt.

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"There are many different definitions of identity, not all of which make sense. I prefer the view that an identity is a set of assertions about yourself that you may lay claim to. So in a sense everyone only has one identity and has only ever had one ‘identity’. But in practice we expose different sets of claims depending on the circumstances. Nobody puts their membership in Alcoholics Anonymous on their CV."

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:00 AM

Interesting article about the integrity of people claiming more than one personality, as put by the writer as a comment on a statement by Zuckerberg.

***

I fully understand the authors point of view, all but one : Zuckerberg never said you had to publish everything visible to everybody. Facebook's structure allows you to swift from one context to another, displaying different personal and corporate information to different sets of people. Basically it comes down to one person, different contexts, differents information flows. Correct me if I am wrong!

Excerpt.

***

"There are many different definitions of identity, not all of which make sense. I prefer the view that an identity is a set of assertions about yourself that you may lay claim to. So in a sense everyone only has one identity and has only ever had one ‘identity’. But in practice we expose different sets of claims depending on the circumstances. Nobody puts their membership in Alcoholics Anonymous on their CV."

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L'amitié à l'épreuve de Facebook

L'amitié à l'épreuve de Facebook | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Alors que le réseau social a dépassé le milliard d’utilisateurs, philosophes et sociologues s’interrogent sur la nature réelle des liens qui s’y tissent.
BeerBergman's insight:

Bel article reprenant; reprenant quelques références en sciences sociales sur le sujet de l'amitié 'à l'ère de Facebook. On peut zapper les premiers deux paragraphes, car inviter un philosophe à exprimer "ses tripes" sur un sujet qui'il ne connaît visiblement pas, c'est un peu comme inviter un footballer à s'exprimer sur la politique mondiale.

***

J'ai une petite interrogation par rapport aux déclarations de Stéphane Vial, quand il dit "[il] estime que les concepteurs de Facebook ont gagné un pari audacieux en désignant par les mots « ami » et « amitié » le lien qu'ils proposent de tisser en ligne. « Au départ, il s'agissait de développer des contacts entre étudiants, mais ils ont voulu provoquer un attachement plus fort, plus affectif, et l'histoire leur a donné raison ! ".


Je ne suis pas certaine que Mark Zuckerberg et cie ont voulu "provoquer un attachement plus fort, plus affectif" en choisissant le terme "amis": 'friends' en américain n'a pas du tout la même connotation que 'amis' en Français, (ou que 'vrienden' en néerlandais par exemple).

Les mêmes mots provoquent un autre ensemble de pensées, sentiments, réflexions, dans de différentes cultures. Certes, 'friends' est plus fort que 'contact' (on ne partage pas les mêmes choses), mais s'inscrit dans une démarche de réseau (universités américaines, avec leurs fortes cultures internes - ref. "scool culture"). 


En revanche, tout à fait d'accord avec sa dernière phrase "Les usagers se sont précipités pour inventer toutes sortes de liaisons, allant de la camaraderie à la relation forte"  [ouf:-)].

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Pour le reste : article à lire. Extrait.

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"Pour la philosophe, une nouvelle « chronologie affective » fondée « sur l'immédiateté et le dialogue » s'est mise en place à travers les réseaux sociaux. « La sociabilité ne réside plus seulement dans le face-à-face physique : chacun se retrouve plongé au coeur d'une communauté virtuelle de proches, vivant avec eux dans une véritable “coprésence” numérique. »C'est une nouvelle manière d'être au monde, affirme Anne Dalsuet. « Prenez la page d'accueil de Facebook. Chaque usager la personnalise avec des photos, des vidéos, des musiques, comme on décore sa chambre. C'est un lieu convivial où nous invitons nos amis de coeur et nos complices, avec qui nous échangeons toute la journée sur un registre ludique et “cool”. C'est une façon de se comporter, une expérience spatio-temporelle tout à fait réelle et inédite. »"

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