Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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Tribes, Flocks, and Single Servings — The Evolution of Digital Behavior — Medium

Tribes, Flocks, and Single Servings — The Evolution of Digital Behavior — Medium | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Mapping Intimacy and Engagement in Online Communities
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Interesting analysis!
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Welcome to the Campaign Against Sex Robots

Welcome to the Campaign Against Sex Robots | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Welcome to the official launch of the Campaign Against Sex Robots. As researchers we encourage a wider debate and discussion about the development of sex robots and the implications for society.

Please read about us here.

Read about the issues on BBC News.

Article in the Washington Post on Sex Robots.

We look forward to your comments, ideas and contributions.

Kathleen Richardson & Erik Brilling
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What Driverless Cars Mean for Today’s Automakers

What Driverless Cars Mean for Today’s Automakers | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The Super Bowl is a great indicator of the importance of brand today. It costs millions of dollars to produce and place a 30-second spot to grab the attention of potential US customers. Last year, almost a full 15% of Super Bowl ads were paid for by car companies trying to grab the hearts and minds of consumers. What happens when that all changes? When individuals are requesting cars on demand that suit their needs at a particular moment, the brand of that car may no longer matter. The Chief Marketing Officer of Mercedes likely won’t be spending millions on 30-second spots.
BeerBergman's insight:

Yeah, all jobs will be "Uberized" :-).

Another question rises also : what will happen to the roads, and to urban landscape, when parking will virtually disappear, since you can measure how many cars are needed to drive in a city to transport all interested people ? And what happens to busses, trams, metros ? And what happens to.... ? :-)

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The New Public Intellectuals | Inside Higher Ed

The New Public Intellectuals | Inside Higher Ed | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting series of articles, following the original article by Nick Kristof at the New York Times, on "Why is academic writing so academic?". Beyond the narratives of decline, not new, Matt Reed proposes an answer to Kristof's outcry.

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I decided to include this article on my Scoop.it because of the inevitable influence of social media and its breaking down of isolated communities of thinkers. The question is: are they really breaking down these walls and how could the outerworld (thinking of "otherness" :-) influence not only academic writing, but perhaps even academic thinking.

Excerpt.

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"The great value of the alternative public sphere that the web has opened, I think, is in bringing deep, detailed discussion of specifics to audiences that normally would have missed them.  The kind of broad, sweeping pronouncements that Public Intellectuals offer tend to do violence to facts on the ground, even if unintentionally.  When no alternative voices could be heard, that damage was hard to stop. Now, anyone who makes grand sweeping pronouncements on the internet learns abruptly what got left out, assumed, or glossed over.  Commenters make it known, often quickly.  The best online communities offer that kind of feedback in the spirit of moving to a more inclusive vision.

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On my better days, I like to believe that a new model of the engaged academic is emerging. It’s less about proclaiming from on high, and more about gathering facts on the ground to move forward inclusively.  Those folks have always existed, but now they can connect with each other, and with non-specialists, too."



Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/confessions-community-college-dean/new-public-intellectuals#ixzz2uFUpRfdZ 
Inside Higher Ed 

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via @Stéphane Vial

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Who's afraid of the 'global poor'?

Who's afraid of the 'global poor'? | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Arguing against David Goodhart (whose controversial new book The British Dream: The Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration has recently been reviewed on openDemocracy), Lugo-Ocando remarked that the reason for the low standard of living for many people in the UK is not that migrants occupy a disproportionately high number of jobs, but is a result of the neo-liberal economic model which requires modes of working that are low-wage, insecure and often exploitative.

These concerns were considered in more conceptual terms in a keynote address by Bridget Anderson, Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society at Oxford University (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford, in which she posed the question: ‘who is the migrant?’ Neither a French banker working in the city, nor an Australian entrepreneur with a multi-million pound business, the migrant is predominantly perceived as poor, racially ‘other’ and non-English speaking. According to Anderson, this perception reflects a wide-reaching fear of the global poor, which demands examination if the political traction of the migrant figure is to be affirmatively appropriated.
BeerBergman's insight:

"This article was first published on 15 July 2013."

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This article makes much sense, a must read, since I suspect that the analysis of the British situation reflects a western-european problem.

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"Approaching immigration in a vacuum results only in the historically ineffectual battle between negative and positive images of migrants and the extent to which they enhance or undermine Britain’s economic and cultural value."

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"Demonstrating the damaging impact of punitive approaches to migration on valued concepts of citizenship, democracy and welfare might help reorient the debate over immigration away from the ‘Us and Them’ paradigm articulated by Anderson towards a shared vision of the kind of society we want to live in. "

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"The ‘naturalness’ of national belonging is one of the key ways in which migrants become the global scapegoats for the failures of global capitalism."

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"The idea of neighbourliness was raised by conference participants as an alternative to the binary opposition between citizen and non-citizen that polarises the debate over migration. This does not entail a wholesale rejection of the concept of national citizenship, which is an enduringly important mode of belonging; not least for refugees unable to return to their country of origin who wish to make a permanent life elsewhere. Instead, neighbourliness suggests an ethical orientation towards others – regardless of political or social status – which recalls philosopher Emmanuel Levinas’s repeated assertion that ‘the other is the neighbour’. In this sense we might also consider ourselves ‘neighbours’ with others the world over, and in doing so overcome those divisions which reduce migrants to symbols of anxiety and fear.  "

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Don't Have Sex With Robots, Say Ethicists

Don't Have Sex With Robots, Say Ethicists | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
We’re moving towards a future of sex with robots whether we like it or not. An outright ban would simply empower a new kind of robot pimp and create an unregulated robot sex black market where anything goes. Why not push for reasonable regulations instead, like ensuring the robots are secure against malware, must look/act of legal age, and establishing legal minimum ages (18+) to use their services?

There’s a puritanical element to the Campaign’s written goals, and despite their stated primary concern for women and children, a sort of sexist edge that assumes few women would be interested in sexual relations with bots.
BeerBergman's insight:

Good article, completely agree to it, since judging about what is 'good' and 'wrong' for 'the people', we might instead provoke what we want to prevent. Also, robots are perhaps good alternatives to real people, in the case of paid sexual activities.

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18. Webstock 2014 Talk Notes and References - postarchitectural

BeerBergman's insight:

I discovered this extremely talented guy, called Sha through his blog. A must read. And don't forget to visit his gallery and his Pinterest boards :-). Excerpt of just one article.

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"I prepared for this talk by collecting links, notes, and references in a flat text file, like I did for Eyeo and Visualized. These references are vaguely sorted into the structure of the talk. Roughly, I tried to talk about the future happening all around us, the startup ecosystem and the pressures for growth that got us there, and the dangerous sides of it both at an individual and a corporate level. I ended by talking about ways for us as a community to intervene in these systems of growth. 

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