Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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Het moet niet gekker worden; de Selfie-hoed is hier!

Het moet niet gekker worden; de Selfie-hoed is hier! | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
De selfie-gekte wordt naar een nieuwe hoogte gebracht met de selfie-hoed van Acer en designer Christian Cowan-Sanluis
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A little bit of fun on #selfies

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Artist Profile: Genevieve Belleveau

Artist Profile: Genevieve Belleveau | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
You've explicitly addressed the selfie culture as a device for self-healing or self-affirmation; what are your thoughts on the female body and the gaze in the age of total [self] surveillance?
BeerBergman's insight:

Los Angeles based artist Genevieve Belleveau works with technology and the self. Here are her thoughts on #selfies (amongst other subjects that you might like). Excerpt.

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"You've explicitly addressed the selfie culture as a device for self-healing or self-affirmation; what are your thoughts on the female body and the gaze in the age of total [self] surveillance?

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One of my main missions is to de-stigmatize the internet as a narcissistic guilt trip. We all long for affection, and social media can be a wonderful way of meeting people you would not have found in any other way. If someone takes a selfie and you see something in their eyes that you can relate to, it is pure magic; we are examining ourselves refracted through a couple thousand followers, creating an ever more prismatic version of identity. It’s possible that this could dispel a notion of rigid self-identity and begin to vaporize the ego into a collective expression and ethical experience of reality. We are already developing psychic abilities and ways of diminishing the lines that separate you from me. Last night at 5am I was lying in bed and you (Jesse) liked the picture of my cat I had posted to Instagram. There is a lot of information that remains unshared in the process but we were also brought together in the moment and I love that. I live for that ecstatic bliss of beingthat we can achieve if we open our hearts to really loving ourselves and sharing that self-love with one another. I don't think that selfies solve the problem, but I think they can be a step towards self-acceptance that can be further explored as we inevitably thrust onwards in this vision of the future."

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Zombie Selfies and Data That Won't Stay Deleted

Zombie Selfies and Data That Won't Stay Deleted | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
But attention has shifted within popular news discourse to focus on the selfie, using it as a kind of modern folk-devil to symbolise a range of social problems and anxieties.
Secondly, the prospect of ‘naked selfies’ that cannot be deleted recalls other, much older forms of social stigma that cannot be removed. Rather than approach digital technologies as offering something liberatory and fun, we are encouraged instead to view every act of photography as a potential burden that can mark us forever, the shame lingering long after we had hoped to eradicate it. This is simple fear-mongering, evident in The Daily Mail‘s assertion that wiping phones does not delete your selfies. The ‘you’ referred to is both assumed to take naked selfies, and chastised for doing so, the fear of shame being used as a means for curbing behaviour.
BeerBergman's insight:

excellent analysis. Agree 100%. another excerpt.

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"Of course this is an absurd limitation on personal freedom, and conceptualises things in simplistic terms of safe / not safe. One cannot stay indoors every day for fear of what might happen outdoors, and the same applies here. Instead of presenting selfie-taking as something to be feared, and as an uncontrollable monster, we need a reframing of the conversation, that conceptualises data breaches such as this without resorting to shaming. But that would require a shift in the perception of selfies, away from corrosive notions of embarrassment or disgrace, towards an acceptance that – gosh!- some people like to take photos of themselves. I’m not going to hold my breath, though."

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The Documented Life

The Documented Life | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them.
BeerBergman's insight:

"We interrupt conversations for documentation all the time", claims Sherry Turkle. But we might consider that documentation has become part of the conversation, a sort of augmented conversation. 

I do not agree with Sherry Turkle on a whole lot of things, and again, I feel this article expresses more an ideology (like the paragraph about Obama taking a selfie at the Mandela memorial service) than a serious neutral request for what digital lives are about. 

"A selfie, like any other photograph, interrupts experience to mark the moment", she says. But I consider the taking or the photograph, including the selfie, like part of the experience. A must read though. Excerpt.

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"A selfie, like any photograph, interrupts experience to mark the moment. In this, it shares something with all the other ways we break up our day, when we text during class, in meetings, at the theater, at dinners with friends. And yes, at funerals, but also more regularly at church and synagogue services. We text when we are in bed with our partners and spouses. We watch our political representatives text during sessions.

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Technology doesn’t just do things for us. It does things to us, changing not just what we do but who we are. The selfie makes us accustomed to putting ourselves and those around us “on pause” in order to document our lives. It is an extension of how we have learned to put our conversations “on pause” when we send or receive a text, an image, an email, a call. When you get accustomed to a life of stops and starts, you get less accustomed to reflecting on where you are and what you are thinking.

We don’t experience interruptions as disruptions anymore."

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WANTED: Selfie competition in travel - must use elves, donkey or legs

WANTED: Selfie competition in travel - must use elves, donkey or legs | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
At some point the "selfie" trend is going to be so tragically uncool (if it isn't getting that way already) that marketers will not dare utter its name.
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Stand by me: Students launch international selfie campaign - News releases - News - The University of Sheffield

Stand by me: Students launch international selfie campaign - News releases - News - The University of Sheffield | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

The  #selfies genre is more and more used in specific marketing-related contexts. Internationalism and cosmopolitanism is one of them. 

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In Praise of Selfies: From Self-Conscious to Self-Constructive

In Praise of Selfies: From Self-Conscious to Self-Constructive | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

And more on selfiesJust as the affordability of mirrors drove the rise of self-portraits in Renaissance Art, cameras have made every smartphone owner into a Nan Goldin.

BeerBergman's insight:

And more on selfies and art. Excerpt.

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"Just as the affordability of mirrors drove the rise of self-portraits in Renaissance Art, reversible cameras have made every smartphone owner into a Cindy Sherman or Nan Goldin. On how we’re no longer self-conscious, but self-constructive.

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We cherish the possibility that someone, anyone, might see us. If photographs possess reality in their pixels, then selfies allow us to possess ourselves: to stage identities and personas. There is the sense that getting the self-portrait just right will right our own identity: if I appear happy, then I must be happy; if I appear intellectual, then I must be an intellectual; if I appear beautiful, then I must be beautiful. Staging the right image becomes the mechanism for achieving that desired identity. The right self-portrait directs others to see us the way we desire to be seen.This has always been the power of self-portraiture. Rarely a documentary genre, self-portraits have always allowed us to craft an argument about who we are, convincing not only others, but also ourselves. While so often selfies are denounced as exercises in narcissism, I’ve always experienced them as experiments in solipsism. A selfie suggests that no one else in the world sees you as you truly are, that no one can be trusted with the camera but you.
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IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT self-portraiture is a genre in which women have long excelled. For so long the male gaze fixed women on the canvas, page, and screen as subjects, but self-portraiture allowed women to challenge this gaze with the ways in which they saw themselves. From Frida Kahlo’s plaintive, surrealistic self-portraits in oil to Cindy Sherman’s conceptual, performative portraits of herself as actresses, gods, and models, female artists have embraced the genre as a way of reclaiming their own image. No longer only objects, women became artists and volunteered as their own subjects.
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It took a while for memoirs and autobiographies to become honest: shedding their armor of artifice and objectivity. Perhaps self-portraits will do the same. Soon our photographs may be as honest and unadorned as our words—the pictures we take of ourselves as authentic as the pictures we take of others. However “uncharted, / Desolate, [and] reluctant” the present is, it’s worth documenting, not only for others, but for ourselves."

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Stop Taking Selfies in Front of Works of Art!

Stop Taking Selfies in Front of Works of Art! | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Today is Museum Selfie Day, in case you weren’t aware, a day in which many of the major museums of
BeerBergman's insight:

Dans le genre... je sais à quoi doit servir un musée, et tout le monde doit y aller, mais à condition de... :-). Excerpt.

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"The ostensible rationale for #MuseumSelfie day is to “to highlight the fun and ‘unstuffiness’ of museums/culture,” and its hard to find fault with that. I’m all for entertaining blurbs, audio guides, podcasts, interactive exhibit features, and certain museums could definitely use some airing out. But the museum-going experience should also be one that’s at least somewhat about interiority and individual reaction—and whatever the selfie is all about, interiority does not rank high. (Interior artistic reflection can be fun, by the way! Ferris Bueller taught us that.) It’s the foreground, not the background that is, by definition, the focus of the selfie."

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Dove lance #Beautyis, une plateforme qui renouvelle le genre du selfie.

Dove lance #Beautyis, une plateforme qui renouvelle le genre du selfie. | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

i les e

BeerBergman's insight:

Si les #selfies sont ce que j'appelle #beyondbeauty, Dove a bien compris le message avec sa campagne #beautyis. Exemple d'un marketing qui vise la singularité des personnes, ce qui en soi représente un autre cadre normatif :-).

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 13, 2014 6:54 AM

Si les #selfies sont ce que j'appelle #beyondbeauty, Dove a bien compris le message avec sa campagne #beautyis. Exemple d'un marketing qui vise la singularité des personnes, ce qui en soi représente un autre cadre normatif :-).

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See The First “Selfie” In History Taken by Robert Cornelius, a Philadelphia Chemist, in 1839

The first recorded instance of the selfie harkens back to what may have been the first photographic portrait. In 1839, a young Philadelphia chemist named Robert Cornelius stepped out of his family’s store and took a photograph of himself. Take a look at the result.
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting article, and don't forget to read the comments :-)

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"I believe the main difference between the pre-internet ‘selfies’ (among which I include painted selfportraits) and the selfie phenomenon of today is the massive scale of it. This makes it possible to compare the way we perceive ourselves and want to be perceived. And what do we see when we make those comparisons? We are all te same:nnhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/95.-salutenhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/81.-bubble-gumnhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/59.-duckfacenhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/61.-headsetnhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/86.-fist"

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Community Post: 22 Pictures Of People Taking Pictures Of Art At The Museum Of Modern Art Paired With Quotes From Social Media Theorists Nathan Jurgenson And Robert Horning Somewhat Haphazardly Sele...

Community Post: 22 Pictures Of People Taking Pictures Of Art At The Museum Of Modern Art Paired With Quotes From Social Media Theorists Nathan Jurgenson And Robert Horning Somewhat Haphazardly Sele... | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
SELFIES ARE DEEP // ART IS SHIT
BeerBergman's insight:

“Virality, unlike celebrity, isn’t about exclusivity or personal talent; it’s about moving information continually. Wanting to go viral is not the same as wanting to become famous. Whereas a famous person has become a someone, a viral self is always in process of becoming, always proving itself. But it needs only to be circulating; it doesn’t need to climb.”

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Selfie Control

Selfie Control | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Critics debate whether selfies are narcissism or empowerment, whether they are vaguely embarrassing, belong in art museums, are evidence of some generational failing, or a revolutionary act of self-love. One thing that emerges out of these debates is a question of the looped gaze, in which the photographer and the subject occupy the same position—indeed, are the same person.
BeerBergman's insight:

#selfies, all the more selfies. Excerpt.

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"If we view the selfie as a kind of pinnacle of photographic consent via the looped gaze (the photographer is the subject, the subject is the photographer), we can depart from this civil contract to interrogate different breakdowns of permission, of recognition—who doesn’t get to take a selfie, and what does that reveal about the conditions that keep them from doing so."

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Selfie-Correction

Selfie-Correction | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
of what selfies are presumed to mean, a social construction that has emerged via numerous articles, blog posts, forum comments, and memes. Rather than celebrate selfie-taking’s potential for negotiating and performing identity, the practice is positioned alongside women’s use of sexting as indicative of a dangerously out-of-control feminine sexuality.
BeerBergman's insight:

Excellent. Must read. Excerpt.

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"(...) of what selfies are presumed to mean, a social construction that has emerged via numerous articles, blog posts, forum comments, and memes. Rather than celebrate selfie-taking’s potential for negotiating and performing identity, the practice is positioned alongside women’s use of sexting as indicative of a dangerously out-of-control feminine sexuality. "

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Sur Instagram, une jeune Norvégienne donne une autre dimension au selfie

Sur Instagram, une jeune Norvégienne donne une autre dimension au selfie | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Le Monde.fr - 1er site d'information. Les articles du journal et toute l'actualité en continu : International, France, Société, Economie, Culture, Environnement, Blogs ...
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#selfietime

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Taking Lots Of Selfies Is Not A Mental Disorder | TechCrunch

Taking Lots Of Selfies Is Not A Mental Disorder | TechCrunch | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Have you heard? The American Psychological Association says that taking an excessive amount of selfies is now considered a mental disorder. But of course this..
BeerBergman's insight:

More on selfies... Excerpt.

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"But not only is “Selfitis” not a true disorder, claiming that it’s a negative behavior may actually be a blow to feminists who hold that the selfie is young female empowerment. Selfie proponents assert that labeling the practice as a disorder is just one more way to call women crazy for being proud of themselves."

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How can travel brands take advantage of the selfie phenomenon?

How can travel brands take advantage of the selfie phenomenon? | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Quite tricky to determine when taking pictures of yourself and posting them on social networks REALLY hit mainstream - but selfies hit a groove this year.
BeerBergman's insight:

Are selfies adapted to a marketing approach by the travel industry?

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Felfies help people understand where their food comes from

Felfies help people understand where their food comes from | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Carrie Mess: Yes, farmers love taking selfies with their animals, but the real benefit is engagement between food producers and consumers
BeerBergman's insight:

I do admit, at first, I found it a strange idea : farmers taking selfies and sending them out. But the article is interesting and puts the movement in a bigger framework. Excerpt.

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"As ag blogger Ryan Goodman said about the felfie on his blog:

It's actually a pretty great way for farmers to mesh with a pop-culture movement and make a few connections that lead to a little advocacy. Adding a bit of personality to our messages helps build those relationships.
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The felfie isn't just a product of having smart phones, it's also a product of having an all consuming job where you are mostly working alone. Snapping a photo of yourself doing something interesting to share with the world creates a fun and helpful circle for farmers to share what they love doing with others who are passionate about food and the environment. Don't get me wrong, I love my cows – they are part of my family – but it's good to have some interaction with folks with opposable thumbs, too.

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@MarDixon » Blog Archive » Going Viral with #MuseumSelfie

@MarDixon » Blog Archive » Going Viral with #MuseumSelfie | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Et la réponse populaire et #fun du #museumselfie day...

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Art at Arm’s Length: A History of the Selfie

Art at Arm’s Length: A History of the Selfie | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
It’s become a new visual genre—a type of self-portraiture formally distinct from all others in history.
BeerBergman's insight:

Excellent analysis of a new genre, the #selfie. A must read. Extract.

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"We live in the age of the selfie. A fast self-portrait, made with a smartphone’s camera and immediately distributed and inscribed into a network, is an instant visual communication of where we are, what we’re doing, who we think we are, and who we think is watching. Selfies have changed aspects of social interaction, body language, self-awareness, privacy, and humor, altering temporality, irony, and public behavior. It’s become a new visual genre—a type of self-portraiture formally distinct from all others in history. Selfies have their own structural autonomy. This is a very big deal for art.

Genres arise relatively rarely. Portraiture is a genre. So is still-life, landscape, animal painting, history painting. (They overlap, too: A portrait might be in a seascape.) A genre possesses its own formal logic, with tropes and structural wisdom, and lasts a long time, until all the problems it was invented to address have been fully addressed. (Genres are distinct from styles, which come and go: There are Expressionist portraits, Cubist portraits, Impressionist portraits, Norman Rockwell portraits. Style is the endless variation within genre.)"

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The Documented Life

We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them.
BeerBergman's insight:

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

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"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

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"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 12, 2014 6:07 PM

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

***

"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

***

"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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Selfie, un genre en soi. Ou pourquoi il ne faut pas prendre les Selfies pour des profile pictures « MOBACTU / by @laurenceallard

Selfie, un genre en soi. Ou pourquoi il ne faut pas prendre les Selfies pour des profile pictures « MOBACTU / by @laurenceallard | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Cela fait un moment que je voulais écrire un article sur les selfies, et je ne l'aurai pas mieux fait que @laurenceallard ! Article à lire. Extrait.

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Le Selfie comme genre consacré ne peut plus tout à faire se confondre avec les pratiques d’autoportraits numériques, les profile pictures. Désormais, on pose « en mode Selfie » quand autrefois on prenait une photo mobile qui ne ressemblait qu’à elle-même voire à rien dans le désordre créatif du premier âge de la photographie mobile.

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Le Selfie demeure donc une pratique démocratique mais est devenu un genre en tant que tel avec ses codes esthétiques (cadrage indiciel…), ses contenus thématiques (« moi »/ »moi et »)  et ses clés d »interprétation (hashtags…)."

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via @Eric Chauvet

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Bitstrips : ma vie format B.D.

Bitstrips : ma vie format B.D. | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Après les selfies, les Bitstrips : ou comment s'imaginer sa vie en mode caricaturale...

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via @carobrugier

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