Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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The Snowden Effect, Quantified

The Snowden Effect, Quantified | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
39 percent of Germany’s 94 percent awareness figure implies that more than 36 percent of online Germans are taking greater pains to protect their security. Various statistics put German Internet penetration at at least 70 percent (CIA data implies a greater than 80 percent rate, but, again, let’s be conservative). Germany has around 81 million citizens.

So, in a single country, the Snowden effect is that at least 20 million people are trying to be safer and more private online.

I wouldn’t call that small. In fact, that’s pretty damn impressive.
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An Experiment In Common Courtesy In The Age Of Google Glass Everywhere

An Experiment In Common Courtesy In The Age Of Google Glass Everywhere | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The questions matter today. Because even if you are taking a photo and it stays “private,” if hackers can tap the iCloud and leak nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence, we have to be concerned about the photos we take--not just the ones that we share.
BeerBergman's insight:

Et la ressource originale en anglais :-).

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Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’

Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’ | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms did not provide new outlets for the discussion of the Snowden-NSA revelations. People who thought their social media friends disagreed with them were less likely to discuss the issues in person and online.
BeerBergman's insight:

Well, the conclusions are very similar to what some of my students reported last year. Interesting study. Excerpt.

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"The survey did not directly explore why people might remain silent if they felt that their opinions were in the minority. The traditional view of the spiral of silence is that people choose not to speak out for fear of isolation. Other Pew Research studies have found that it is common for social media users to be mistaken about their friends’ beliefs and to be surprised once they discover their friends’ actual views via social media. Thus, it might be the case that people do not want to disclose their minority views for fear of disappointing their friends, getting into fruitless arguments, or losing them entirely. Some people may prefer not to share their views on social media because their posts persist and can be found later—perhaps by prospective employers or others with high status. As to why the absence of agreement on social media platforms spills over into a spiral of silence in physical settings, we speculate that social media users may have witnessed those with minority opinions experiencing ostracism, ridicule or bullying online, and that this might increase the perceived risk of opinion sharing in other settings."

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"There are limits to what this snapshot can tell us about how social media use is related to the ways Americans discuss important political issues. This study focuses on one specific public affairs issue that was of interest to most Americans: the Snowden-NSA revelations. It is not an exhaustive review of all public policy issues and the way they are discussed in social media."

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How Social Media Silences Debate

How Social Media Silences Debate | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
People have always tended to surround themselves with like-minded people, but the Internet makes doing so easier than ever before, a study finds.
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting, not surprising: will time teach us to be different in the future or are social organization and norms universal and reluctant to change? Excerpt.

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"The Internet, it seems, is contributing to the polarization of America, as people surround themselves with people who think like them and hesitate to say anything different. Internet companies magnify the effect, by tweaking their algorithms to show us more content from people who are similar to us.

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[Talk] Tracing the Constellation of Actors in the Peer Economy - 4/16 @ 12pm - Blog of FUSE Labs at Microsoft Research

[Talk] Tracing the Constellation of Actors in the Peer Economy - 4/16 @ 12pm - Blog of FUSE Labs at Microsoft Research | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
[Talk] Tracing the Constellation of Actors in the Peer Economy - 4/16 @ 12pm Tomorrow (4/16) we’ll have a Denise Cheng from MIT presenting her research on the peer economy. This is what she has to say...
BeerBergman's insight:

More on Peer economy. Excerpt.

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"

I lay out the expanse of the peer economy and why it is so exciting. The flexibility of working in the peer economy brings in many people who are defined out of the traditional workplace—homecarers, the elderly, the mentally disabled, alongside the underemployed college graduate. Powering this momentum on a macro level are investors, companies, corporations, scholars, policymakers, and more. On the micro-level, however, there are very real risks, and I will detail known problems in the space, including tax remittance, regulatory skirmishes, liability, and operational costs. 
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Finally, the peer economy’s expanse is also why it is so confusing. Peer economy, sharing economy, collaborative economy, crowdsourcing… liberal use of these terms have led to widespread misunderstandings. I suggest that inaccurate terminology leaves the peer economy vulnerable to criticism and peer economy users in limbo as policy begins to take shape."
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The Real Victims of Journal Paywalls » Cyborgology

The Real Victims of Journal Paywalls » Cyborgology | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

I recently posted an article on an ongoing debate of why scientific writing is so unreadable and will add another piece of information I found online: Jenny Davis' article on free access to scientific material. 

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I actually am in one of the positions mentionedin the article: I consider myself an independent, non-trained (autodidact) professionnel, teaching classins outside University and sometimes a few hours at University.

I spend about 2 000 € per year on the purchase of books, to constitute a library around my subjects, and am not eager to add quite high costs on academic journals and libraries to that amount. Add to this the quite expensive books in some 'niche' sujects, like anthropology/tourism studies, and yes, I feel frustrated. MOOCS and other online training courses, give you access to scientific approaches, studying online (blogs, articles, debates) can do some of the rest - the missing part of journals becomes more and more evident when you advance in your research.

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With the changes in formal training programs and education ideology, brought about by technology and changing ideas about access to information and training opportunities, access to these resources is going to be an important part for disclosure without constraint. The scientific community will probably discover more and more professionals capable of adding insights and analysis to their practices.

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The New Public Intellectuals | Inside Higher Ed

The New Public Intellectuals | Inside Higher Ed | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting series of articles, following the original article by Nick Kristof at the New York Times, on "Why is academic writing so academic?". Beyond the narratives of decline, not new, Matt Reed proposes an answer to Kristof's outcry.

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I decided to include this article on my Scoop.it because of the inevitable influence of social media and its breaking down of isolated communities of thinkers. The question is: are they really breaking down these walls and how could the outerworld (thinking of "otherness" :-) influence not only academic writing, but perhaps even academic thinking.

Excerpt.

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"The great value of the alternative public sphere that the web has opened, I think, is in bringing deep, detailed discussion of specifics to audiences that normally would have missed them.  The kind of broad, sweeping pronouncements that Public Intellectuals offer tend to do violence to facts on the ground, even if unintentionally.  When no alternative voices could be heard, that damage was hard to stop. Now, anyone who makes grand sweeping pronouncements on the internet learns abruptly what got left out, assumed, or glossed over.  Commenters make it known, often quickly.  The best online communities offer that kind of feedback in the spirit of moving to a more inclusive vision.

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On my better days, I like to believe that a new model of the engaged academic is emerging. It’s less about proclaiming from on high, and more about gathering facts on the ground to move forward inclusively.  Those folks have always existed, but now they can connect with each other, and with non-specialists, too."



Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/confessions-community-college-dean/new-public-intellectuals#ixzz2uFUpRfdZ 
Inside Higher Ed 

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via @Stéphane Vial

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http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/nov/14/study-reveals-how-twitter-grabs-your-attention

"The context also affects the feeling of personal relevance, something which is 51% above the baseline for typical online use. In this case, that is defined as activity in one part of the brain known as a Brodmann area, specifically the Brodmann area associated with personal relevance – things we relate strongly too.

Armstrong says that Twitter scores quite so highly because “People are seeing stuff in a context which is immensely personally relevant. It’s their own timeline, that they’ve constructed and which represents what they’re interested in. It’s a hugely different impact, because context affects massively the way we respond.”

Both of those peaks combine to push Twitter above the norm in one of the areas of the brain responsible for memory encoding."
BeerBergman's insight:

"But Niall Moore, a neuroscientist at UCL, casts doubt on how strongly conclusions can be drawn from the report, pointing out that “this isn’t a scientific study. This has not been peer-reviewed and their methods are not clearly explained … I’m pretty skeptical of the whole thing, and I think they are making really quite unrealistic claims.”"

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On Researcher Betrayal: Exposing Youth Technology Practices to Parents

On Researcher Betrayal: Exposing Youth Technology Practices to Parents | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The other day I met a friend’s extended family over dinner, including their two sons of about middle school age, and we …
BeerBergman's insight:

Views on the role and boundaries of researchers.

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One week of carsharing in Milan

One week of carsharing in Milan | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

Via 15marches
BeerBergman's insight:

Now this is amazing! Data visualization of car sharing in Milan - what can it learn us about mobility patterns in the city? Excerpt.

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"This project is intended as a small experiment with an Academic purpose. Our goal is to find out new way to explore, analyze and visualize mobility patterns in the city without any commercial or advertising purpose.
As we explain in the previous description we don't have the data about the routes of each car but we used a routing open service to estimate them. If you are interested about this topic please take a look at this project by Mappable that have been particularly inspiring for us."

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Denise Cheng | hiDenise

Denise Cheng | hiDenise | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
MIT THESIS
Reading between the lines: Blueprints for a worker support infrastructure in the emerging peer economy
“Technologies that change society are technologies that change interactions between...
BeerBergman's insight:

Peer economy, sharing economy and the future of work: thesis by Denise Cheng (download). Excerpt.

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"“The excitement that I have observed around the peer economy—even when it is naïve—is a recognition that now is a chance to do things better.”"

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Everybody Knows This Isn’t Nowhere: Designing for Non-Places - Blog of FUSE Labs at Microsoft Research

Everybody Knows This Isn’t Nowhere: Designing for Non-Places - Blog of FUSE Labs at Microsoft Research | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Everybody Knows This Isn't Nowhere: Designing for Non-Places This summer at FUSE, we’ve been thinking about the “non-places” that people spend much of their lives at every day. While this term might...
BeerBergman's insight:

Wow, interesting! A must read. Excerpts.

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"One concern with non-places and the increasing role they play in our lives, is that they are without character, and promote feelings of detachment. Despite the large number of people constantly passing through non-places, they lack a sense of community. We’re starting to investigate what role social computing systems might play in addressing some of the shortcomings of non-places.

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This app will help us investigate how to design systems to cultivate communities for non-places. Over the summer we’re looking to explore questions of anonymity, identity, and engagement. How do we design social computing systems that allow people to connect, but are respectful of the delicate social balance of non-places?"

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Pourquoi mon peignoir connecté peut-il me rendre meilleur chaque matin ? | Le Cercle Les Echos

BeerBergman's insight:

The article describes the - supposed - influence of a connected object, the peignoir, to enhance everyday life: it describes how the connected peignoir, not only a connected object but also a learning object, changes the habits and helps the user through its actual use of the object, to adjust his habits to its imperatives. An exemple of how human - technologie interactivity will probably shape our actual lives a few years on. 

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Interesting article: from the use of the central notion "better [person]" to the integration of technology in everyday life. As for the first notion, the use of the word "better" (meilleur) in relation to the person : how can an object, connected as it is, make somebody "a better person"? What is a "better person"? What is the opposite of "the better person"?

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The concept of connected items is in the center of attention of researchers, philosophers and sociologists, as well as journalists. The exemple of the connected peignoir is a nice exemple of how technology is supposed to augment our physical lifes. The main question is: how normative is the "embetterment", how effective we want to become and at what cost?

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This type of technology being mostly in the hands of and used by early adopters, its testing takes place on a real life scale, and research is probably using clinical investigation as well as real life observations.

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The outcome may well not be the "better person", and the technology here invoked may probably serve completely other purposes a couple of years from now, but the real life testing of the early adopters and the observations noted in the online press as well as in scientific journals is highly exciting!

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