Web 2.0 et société
14.4K views | +1 today
Follow
Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
Curated by BeerBergman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

Want to Remember Your Museum Visit? Don't Take Pictures

Want to Remember Your Museum Visit? Don't Take Pictures | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
When it comes to looking at art and artifacts, new research may encourage habitual shutterbugs to put away their cameras. A study suggests museum-goers are less likely to remember objects they photograph than objects they simply observe.

However, taking a zoomed-in photo of a specific part of a painting, mosaic or statue could help preserve memory of the entire piece, the researchers found.
BeerBergman's insight:
Now, the question is: do we want to remember everything? Can the mind be helped by technology to decide what to 'really' see and remember, and what to forget (but still have in our collection of signs)?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

Barthes_Roland_Camera_Lucida_Reflections_on_Photography.pdf

BeerBergman's insight:

Quand tu es loin de la maison et tu n'as pas emporté ton livre de Barthes avec toi, quel plaisir de découvrir le texte intégral en ligne ! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

David Hockney: Why art has become 'less'

David Hockney: Why art has become 'less' | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Royal Academy in London
BeerBergman's insight:

Since art is slowly finding its way back into my teaching and writing (and one day probably painting - again), I thought that Hockney's thoughts (should find another word, ok), on a subject that is important for art, but also for al that is captured "au sens large". What has photography and video done to our appreciation of time and space as larger concepts?

So, art, as part of web 2.0 and société. Because I think it should be part of it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

The Documented Life

The Documented Life | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them.
BeerBergman's insight:

"We interrupt conversations for documentation all the time", claims Sherry Turkle. But we might consider that documentation has become part of the conversation, a sort of augmented conversation. 

I do not agree with Sherry Turkle on a whole lot of things, and again, I feel this article expresses more an ideology (like the paragraph about Obama taking a selfie at the Mandela memorial service) than a serious neutral request for what digital lives are about. 

"A selfie, like any other photograph, interrupts experience to mark the moment", she says. But I consider the taking or the photograph, including the selfie, like part of the experience. A must read though. Excerpt.

***

"A selfie, like any photograph, interrupts experience to mark the moment. In this, it shares something with all the other ways we break up our day, when we text during class, in meetings, at the theater, at dinners with friends. And yes, at funerals, but also more regularly at church and synagogue services. We text when we are in bed with our partners and spouses. We watch our political representatives text during sessions.

***

Technology doesn’t just do things for us. It does things to us, changing not just what we do but who we are. The selfie makes us accustomed to putting ourselves and those around us “on pause” in order to document our lives. It is an extension of how we have learned to put our conversations “on pause” when we send or receive a text, an image, an email, a call. When you get accustomed to a life of stops and starts, you get less accustomed to reflecting on where you are and what you are thinking.

We don’t experience interruptions as disruptions anymore."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

In Praise of Selfies: From Self-Conscious to Self-Constructive

In Praise of Selfies: From Self-Conscious to Self-Constructive | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

And more on selfiesJust as the affordability of mirrors drove the rise of self-portraits in Renaissance Art, cameras have made every smartphone owner into a Nan Goldin.

BeerBergman's insight:

And more on selfies and art. Excerpt.

***

"Just as the affordability of mirrors drove the rise of self-portraits in Renaissance Art, reversible cameras have made every smartphone owner into a Cindy Sherman or Nan Goldin. On how we’re no longer self-conscious, but self-constructive.

***
We cherish the possibility that someone, anyone, might see us. If photographs possess reality in their pixels, then selfies allow us to possess ourselves: to stage identities and personas. There is the sense that getting the self-portrait just right will right our own identity: if I appear happy, then I must be happy; if I appear intellectual, then I must be an intellectual; if I appear beautiful, then I must be beautiful. Staging the right image becomes the mechanism for achieving that desired identity. The right self-portrait directs others to see us the way we desire to be seen.This has always been the power of self-portraiture. Rarely a documentary genre, self-portraits have always allowed us to craft an argument about who we are, convincing not only others, but also ourselves. While so often selfies are denounced as exercises in narcissism, I’ve always experienced them as experiments in solipsism. A selfie suggests that no one else in the world sees you as you truly are, that no one can be trusted with the camera but you.
***
IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT self-portraiture is a genre in which women have long excelled. For so long the male gaze fixed women on the canvas, page, and screen as subjects, but self-portraiture allowed women to challenge this gaze with the ways in which they saw themselves. From Frida Kahlo’s plaintive, surrealistic self-portraits in oil to Cindy Sherman’s conceptual, performative portraits of herself as actresses, gods, and models, female artists have embraced the genre as a way of reclaiming their own image. No longer only objects, women became artists and volunteered as their own subjects.
***
It took a while for memoirs and autobiographies to become honest: shedding their armor of artifice and objectivity. Perhaps self-portraits will do the same. Soon our photographs may be as honest and unadorned as our words—the pictures we take of ourselves as authentic as the pictures we take of others. However “uncharted, / Desolate, [and] reluctant” the present is, it’s worth documenting, not only for others, but for ourselves."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

See The First “Selfie” In History Taken by Robert Cornelius, a Philadelphia Chemist, in 1839

The first recorded instance of the selfie harkens back to what may have been the first photographic portrait. In 1839, a young Philadelphia chemist named Robert Cornelius stepped out of his family’s store and took a photograph of himself. Take a look at the result.
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting article, and don't forget to read the comments :-)

***

"I believe the main difference between the pre-internet ‘selfies’ (among which I include painted selfportraits) and the selfie phenomenon of today is the massive scale of it. This makes it possible to compare the way we perceive ourselves and want to be perceived. And what do we see when we make those comparisons? We are all te same:nnhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/95.-salutenhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/81.-bubble-gumnhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/59.-duckfacenhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/61.-headsetnhttp://www.avadenticals.org/categories/86.-fist"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

La réponse d’un musée à la prise de photos dans les musées | Nouvelles | Réseau canadien d'information sur le patrimoine

La réponse d’un musée à la prise de photos dans les musées | Nouvelles | Réseau canadien d'information sur le patrimoine | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
La page d'accueil du Réseau canadien d'information sur le patrimoine (RCIP) présente ses programmes d'investissement, des technologies innovatrices et des ressources pour les musées canadiens.
BeerBergman's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

Digital Identities: Social Networks & Me

Digital Identities: Social Networks & Me | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Retranscription of a lecture in the Distinguished Lecture Series at Sciences Po Paris (October 2014).
BeerBergman's insight:

DLS published a great resumé of my lecture, that I take the liberty to share with you:


"Is the online me the real me or the fake me? On the 1st of October, Beer Bergman shared her views about the world we live in today, where social networking and digital identity creating are sometimes essential. She raised questions about the importance and the accuracy of selfies and avatars; how do they represent us? Are they authentic or only masks? Why do we need to “practice smiling”? What about the issue of sociability or “éxtimité”? In general, we have three profiles: professional, intimate and public, and they constitute a “multiple quest for identity”. She considers the “me” as a collection: of traces, of persons…And often, the management of one’s profile is dealt with as a real business. Finally, she mentioned the problems of ethics in social media, which are often questioned. Social media may have to be rethought and morality to be developed. But, as she pointed out, there is “no need to say that it is a good thing or a bad thing. It’s the world we live in."

http://distinguishedseries.com/2014/10/04/digital-identities-social-networks-and-me/


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

An Experiment In Common Courtesy In The Age Of Google Glass Everywhere

An Experiment In Common Courtesy In The Age Of Google Glass Everywhere | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The questions matter today. Because even if you are taking a photo and it stays “private,” if hackers can tap the iCloud and leak nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence, we have to be concerned about the photos we take--not just the ones that we share.
BeerBergman's insight:

Et la ressource originale en anglais :-).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

Selfie Control

Selfie Control | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Critics debate whether selfies are narcissism or empowerment, whether they are vaguely embarrassing, belong in art museums, are evidence of some generational failing, or a revolutionary act of self-love. One thing that emerges out of these debates is a question of the looped gaze, in which the photographer and the subject occupy the same position—indeed, are the same person.
BeerBergman's insight:

#selfies, all the more selfies. Excerpt.

***

"If we view the selfie as a kind of pinnacle of photographic consent via the looped gaze (the photographer is the subject, the subject is the photographer), we can depart from this civil contract to interrogate different breakdowns of permission, of recognition—who doesn’t get to take a selfie, and what does that reveal about the conditions that keep them from doing so."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

Felfies help people understand where their food comes from

Felfies help people understand where their food comes from | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Carrie Mess: Yes, farmers love taking selfies with their animals, but the real benefit is engagement between food producers and consumers
BeerBergman's insight:

I do admit, at first, I found it a strange idea : farmers taking selfies and sending them out. But the article is interesting and puts the movement in a bigger framework. Excerpt.

***

"As ag blogger Ryan Goodman said about the felfie on his blog:

It's actually a pretty great way for farmers to mesh with a pop-culture movement and make a few connections that lead to a little advocacy. Adding a bit of personality to our messages helps build those relationships.
***
The felfie isn't just a product of having smart phones, it's also a product of having an all consuming job where you are mostly working alone. Snapping a photo of yourself doing something interesting to share with the world creates a fun and helpful circle for farmers to share what they love doing with others who are passionate about food and the environment. Don't get me wrong, I love my cows – they are part of my family – but it's good to have some interaction with folks with opposable thumbs, too.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by BeerBergman
Scoop.it!

Art at Arm’s Length: A History of the Selfie

Art at Arm’s Length: A History of the Selfie | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
It’s become a new visual genre—a type of self-portraiture formally distinct from all others in history.
BeerBergman's insight:

Excellent analysis of a new genre, the #selfie. A must read. Extract.

***

"We live in the age of the selfie. A fast self-portrait, made with a smartphone’s camera and immediately distributed and inscribed into a network, is an instant visual communication of where we are, what we’re doing, who we think we are, and who we think is watching. Selfies have changed aspects of social interaction, body language, self-awareness, privacy, and humor, altering temporality, irony, and public behavior. It’s become a new visual genre—a type of self-portraiture formally distinct from all others in history. Selfies have their own structural autonomy. This is a very big deal for art.

Genres arise relatively rarely. Portraiture is a genre. So is still-life, landscape, animal painting, history painting. (They overlap, too: A portrait might be in a seascape.) A genre possesses its own formal logic, with tropes and structural wisdom, and lasts a long time, until all the problems it was invented to address have been fully addressed. (Genres are distinct from styles, which come and go: There are Expressionist portraits, Cubist portraits, Impressionist portraits, Norman Rockwell portraits. Style is the endless variation within genre.)"

more...
No comment yet.