Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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The Internet of Things and the Fourth Amendment of Effects by Andrew Guthrie Ferguson :: SSRN

The Internet of Things and the Fourth Amendment of Effects by Andrew Guthrie Ferguson :: SSRN | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
By 2020 there will be billions of “things” connected through the “Internet of Things.” These smart devices built within our homes, cars, smartphones, clothing,
BeerBergman's insight:

"This network of smart devices also poses a new challenge for a Fourth Amendment built around “effects.” The constitutional language protecting “persons, houses, papers, and effects” from unreasonable searches and seizures must confront this change. This article addresses how a Fourth Amendment built on old-fashioned “effects” can address a new world when things are no longer just inactive, static objects, but objects that create and communicate data with other things.

The article seeks to answer two questions. First, what is the definition of an “effect” for Fourth Amendment purposes in a world defined by an interconnected, network-like Internet of Things? Second, assuming that a Fourth Amendment “effect” has a broader definition that potentially includes the digital information embedded in the object and the wireless communication signals emanating from the device, then what expectation of security should attach to these effects?"

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Building gated communities

Building gated communities | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Freedom and social media
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"Thus we risk shaping the online world exactly in the opposite direction as we would like it to be (and become): actions and absence of actions are co-constructing factors in social digital space. We hear the whispering of fear for lack of control on our personal lives that result in gated online communities, but is acting accordingly not exactly initiating what we are fearing most of all? Remember Berlin’s Wall, amongst many others. #Freedom"

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Tim Berners-Lee calls for internet bill of rights to ensure greater privacy

Tim Berners-Lee calls for internet bill of rights to ensure greater privacy | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

(TIm Berners-Lee) "He called for an internet version of the Magna Carta, the 13th century English charter credited with guaranteeing basic rights and freedoms.

Concerns over privacy and freedom on the internet have increased in the wake of the revelation of mass government monitoring of online activity following leaks by former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden.

A ruling by the European Union to allow individuals to ask search engines such as Google to remove links to information about them, called the “right to be forgotten”, has also raised concerns over the potential for censorship.

“There have been lots of times that it has been abused, so now the Magna Carta is about saying...I want a web where I’m not spied on, where there’s no censorship,” Berners-Lee said.

The scientist added that in order to be a “neutral medium”, the internet had to reflect all of humanity, including “some ghastly stuff”.

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Tim Berners-Lee: we need to re-decentralise the web (Wired UK)

Tim Berners-Lee: we need to re-decentralise the web (Wired UK) | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Twenty-five years on from the web's inception, its creator has urged the public to re-engage with its original design: a decentralised internet that at its very core, remains open to all
BeerBergman's insight:

Important stuff. From an important man for the web and thus society. A must read. Citation.

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He reiterated the need to  protect whistleblowers like Edward Snowden that leak information only in extreme circumstances "because they have this role in society". But more than this, he noted the need for hackers. 

"It's a really important culture, it's important to have the geek community as a whole think about its responsibility and what it can do. We need various alternative voices pushing back on conventional government sometimes." 

In the midst of so much political and social disruption, the man who changed the course of communication, education, activism and so much more, and in so many ways, remains dedicated to fighting for a web founded in freedom and openness. But when asked what he would have done differently, the answer was easy. "I would have got rid of the slash slash after the colon. You don't really need it. It just seemed like a good idea at the time.""

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Campaign to Stop Killer Robots

Campaign to Stop Killer Robots | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
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All kinds of other things but sex robots that we might want to ban. Killer robots, for example...

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Building gated communities

Building gated communities | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Freedom and social media
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Questioning myself about the "free" reconstruction of online gated communities and its negative impact on the community in a larger sense.

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Is Translating Jihadist Texts on the Internet a Crime?

Is Translating Jihadist Texts on the Internet a Crime? | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
In the spring of 2005, Tarek Mehanna began translating radical Arabic books and videos into English for the website At Tibyan. The materials had an undeniable flavor of terrorism, encouraging readers to join al-Qaida and kill American soldiers in Iraq. But even the government acknowledges that Mehanna never translated anything...
BeerBergman's insight:

Essential question, and a difficult one. Excerpts.

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"If the justices do agree to review Mehanna’s conviction, it’ll be wading into a constitutional controversy at once timeless and novel. The court has long recognized that cheerleading for terrorism may eventually cross the line from free speech to a criminal act. But the Internet’s ability to spread ideas and connect like-minded people may now force the justices to reconsider that boundary. And if the court lets Mehanna’s conviction stand, it may wind up drawing the line dangerously close to the kind of Internet activity some of us engage in without a second thought."

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Why is this distinction between “advocacy” and “communication” important? Because without it, we may accidentally become a nation of criminal terrorist sympathizers. The Internet fosters association and amplifies advocacy. Under the government’s revised interpretation of the law, an American who uses the Web to defend terrorist groups might find herself facing federal prosecution."

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