Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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The Political Power of Social Media

A slowly developing public sphere, where public opinion relies on both media and conversation, is the core of the environmental view of Internet freedom. As opposed to the self-aggrandizing view that the West holds the source code for democracy -- and if it were only made accessible, the remaining autocratic states would crumble -- the environmental view assumes that little political change happens without the dissemination and adoption of ideas and opinions in the public sphere. Access to information is far less important, politically, than access to conversation. Moreover, a public sphere is more likely to emerge in a society as a result of people's dissatisfaction with matters of economics or day-to-day governance than from their embrace of abstract political ideals.
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How Adelaide revitalized itself through ‘placemaking’, via @Citiscope

How Adelaide revitalized itself through ‘placemaking’, via @Citiscope | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

"And so “Splash Adelaide” was born. It was a “fast and dirty” anything-goes approach to placemaking, intended to trial new ideas and see what might work. Splash Adelaide projects could break any council policy, but not break the law. Streets, laneways and squares were closed off almost without warning to create street parties, outdoor film screenings, spontaneous orchestral performances and urban guerilla-style vegetable gardens.  Mistakes were encouraged, as a way for city administrators to learn how to do things differently.

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The idea was to “consult by doing” and to get businesses and residents to think about shared spaces in new ways. Because the interventions were temporary and experimental, there was no huge risk. According to Yarwood and Smith, the aim was for these ephemeral projects to inspire members of the community to become involved, take charge and create a longer-term legacy of positive and sustainable transformation, step by step, square by square, street by street and district by district."

BeerBergman's insight:

"Mistakes were encouraged, as a way for city administrators to learn how to do things differently." - seems to me the most important approach for any development project.

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Avaaz: can online campaigning reinvent politics?

Avaaz: can online campaigning reinvent politics? | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The petitioning group Avaaz is polling its 17 million members to redefine its priorities as part of a huge exercise in global democracy. But does its brand of online activism actually work?
BeerBergman's insight:

Excellent article on the future of politics and democracy, through an investigation on the benefits and draw backs of online petition platforms, like Avaaz. A must read, here are some excerpts.

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"But with scale comes challenges: what have the groups actually achieved? Who's really in charge – the paid staff or the diffuse member base? And now governments are starting to take digital democracy seriously – with official petition sites, open policymaking and more – what's the point in the long term?

Avaaz began its annual consultation with half a million emails sent last Thursday, imploring its members – those who have signed previous petitions, or participated in other actions – to answer an extensive poll on what should be done in 2013. The resulting ballot is perhaps one of the biggest exercises in direct democracy ever undertaken: across millions of members, 14 languages, over a hundred countries."
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""I think the clicktivism debate is just silly. I don't think anyone doubts that iTunes has changed music, or eBay has changed commerce. No one calls that clicktivism," she says. "No one calls Gandhi a 'walkavist', or Rosa Parks a 'sitavist'. The internet is really just the place where this change is happening. Think local, act local, think national, act national, think global, act global – I think that's what Avaaz provides."
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"... has a somewhat damning verdict on the effectiveness of petitions. "They are definitely the junk food of democracy – they make you feel good for the moment but they don't necessarily move things forward," he says. "Like with everything, the easier it is for people in a power position to discredit what you're doing as just the usual suspects, or just people signing a petition, then it will be discredited."

Zacharzewski supports the idea of more interventionist, participatory democracy, but advocates more subtle interventions, online and offline: gathering "juries" of citizens to discuss in detail specific issues, or opening up policy-making beyond traditional lobbies and civil servants."
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"And in all probability, says Zacharzewski, the losers will be the political parties, as people focus directly on each individual issue they support rather than signing up to the bundle of compromises that makes up a traditional party manifesto."
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""I think parties have a huge structural problem," he says. "One of my trustees says the parties are dead and not coming back. I think that's a bit strong, but I think the concept of the party as a vehicle for mass compromise is foundering on the fact that people aren't willing to put up with mass compromise any more."

 

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Racist trolls are being shamed with billboards showing their messages

Racist trolls are being shamed with billboards showing their messages | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Racist comments are hardly a rarity online – unfortunately, equal access for all means equal access for the abusers too; that’s the price of freedom in this case.

However, anti-racism campaigners in Brazil are dealing with online comments in a way that should really hit home for the people leaving the remarks.

The project is called ‘Virtual racism, real consequences‘ and sees real racist comments left on social media put on billboards near the posters’ houses.
BeerBergman's insight:

Speechless... but probably a good test.

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Meet Change.org, the Google of Modern Politics | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

Meet Change.org, the Google of Modern Politics | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Ben Rattray, the CEO of Change.org. Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED After Trayvon Martin was shot dead inside a Florida gated community and the state decli
BeerBergman's insight:

Trying to get the information gathered about online petition platforms. 

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