Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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Photos: The colorful world of Hong Kong’s protest art

Photos: The colorful world of Hong Kong’s protest art | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
"This is the most well-designed protest in recent memory."
BeerBergman's insight:

More on art, design and protest. A big thank you to @Abonchat Bonrat/ @breizh2008 :-)

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Artist Profile: Genevieve Belleveau

Artist Profile: Genevieve Belleveau | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
You've explicitly addressed the selfie culture as a device for self-healing or self-affirmation; what are your thoughts on the female body and the gaze in the age of total [self] surveillance?
BeerBergman's insight:

Los Angeles based artist Genevieve Belleveau works with technology and the self. Here are her thoughts on #selfies (amongst other subjects that you might like). Excerpt.

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"You've explicitly addressed the selfie culture as a device for self-healing or self-affirmation; what are your thoughts on the female body and the gaze in the age of total [self] surveillance?

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One of my main missions is to de-stigmatize the internet as a narcissistic guilt trip. We all long for affection, and social media can be a wonderful way of meeting people you would not have found in any other way. If someone takes a selfie and you see something in their eyes that you can relate to, it is pure magic; we are examining ourselves refracted through a couple thousand followers, creating an ever more prismatic version of identity. It’s possible that this could dispel a notion of rigid self-identity and begin to vaporize the ego into a collective expression and ethical experience of reality. We are already developing psychic abilities and ways of diminishing the lines that separate you from me. Last night at 5am I was lying in bed and you (Jesse) liked the picture of my cat I had posted to Instagram. There is a lot of information that remains unshared in the process but we were also brought together in the moment and I love that. I live for that ecstatic bliss of beingthat we can achieve if we open our hearts to really loving ourselves and sharing that self-love with one another. I don't think that selfies solve the problem, but I think they can be a step towards self-acceptance that can be further explored as we inevitably thrust onwards in this vision of the future."

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In Praise of Selfies: From Self-Conscious to Self-Constructive

In Praise of Selfies: From Self-Conscious to Self-Constructive | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

And more on selfiesJust as the affordability of mirrors drove the rise of self-portraits in Renaissance Art, cameras have made every smartphone owner into a Nan Goldin.

BeerBergman's insight:

And more on selfies and art. Excerpt.

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"Just as the affordability of mirrors drove the rise of self-portraits in Renaissance Art, reversible cameras have made every smartphone owner into a Cindy Sherman or Nan Goldin. On how we’re no longer self-conscious, but self-constructive.

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We cherish the possibility that someone, anyone, might see us. If photographs possess reality in their pixels, then selfies allow us to possess ourselves: to stage identities and personas. There is the sense that getting the self-portrait just right will right our own identity: if I appear happy, then I must be happy; if I appear intellectual, then I must be an intellectual; if I appear beautiful, then I must be beautiful. Staging the right image becomes the mechanism for achieving that desired identity. The right self-portrait directs others to see us the way we desire to be seen.This has always been the power of self-portraiture. Rarely a documentary genre, self-portraits have always allowed us to craft an argument about who we are, convincing not only others, but also ourselves. While so often selfies are denounced as exercises in narcissism, I’ve always experienced them as experiments in solipsism. A selfie suggests that no one else in the world sees you as you truly are, that no one can be trusted with the camera but you.
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IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT self-portraiture is a genre in which women have long excelled. For so long the male gaze fixed women on the canvas, page, and screen as subjects, but self-portraiture allowed women to challenge this gaze with the ways in which they saw themselves. From Frida Kahlo’s plaintive, surrealistic self-portraits in oil to Cindy Sherman’s conceptual, performative portraits of herself as actresses, gods, and models, female artists have embraced the genre as a way of reclaiming their own image. No longer only objects, women became artists and volunteered as their own subjects.
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It took a while for memoirs and autobiographies to become honest: shedding their armor of artifice and objectivity. Perhaps self-portraits will do the same. Soon our photographs may be as honest and unadorned as our words—the pictures we take of ourselves as authentic as the pictures we take of others. However “uncharted, / Desolate, [and] reluctant” the present is, it’s worth documenting, not only for others, but for ourselves."

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Google Hands - Benjamin Shaykin / graphic design

Google Hands - Benjamin Shaykin / graphic design | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Benjamin Shaykin designs books and other things in Providence, RI.
BeerBergman's insight:

And then, this one, absolutely marvelous. Click on the image and enter the enigmatic beauty of... a book.

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David Hockney: Why art has become 'less'

David Hockney: Why art has become 'less' | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Royal Academy in London
BeerBergman's insight:

Since art is slowly finding its way back into my teaching and writing (and one day probably painting - again), I thought that Hockney's thoughts (should find another word, ok), on a subject that is important for art, but also for al that is captured "au sens large". What has photography and video done to our appreciation of time and space as larger concepts?

So, art, as part of web 2.0 and société. Because I think it should be part of it.

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Classic Paintings, Explained With Tweets, Status Updates, and Emojis | Underwire | WIRED

Classic Paintings, Explained With Tweets, Status Updates, and Emojis | Underwire | WIRED | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Most people look at a Renaissance or Edward Hopper painting and see classic art. Digital artist Nastya Ptichek sees emojis. And Instagram likes. And Facebook requests.
BeerBergman's insight:

Awesome. 

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"Internet accolades aside, the images could also have another benefit: introducing the emoji nation to the classics. Hey, if even one college freshman gasps, “Ohhh, I get it now!” after seeing Ptichek’s work, it would be a huge boon to the increasing importance of emoji—and carry a lot more weight than another Tumblr heart."

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Community Post: 22 Pictures Of People Taking Pictures Of Art At The Museum Of Modern Art Paired With Quotes From Social Media Theorists Nathan Jurgenson And Robert Horning Somewhat Haphazardly Sele...

Community Post: 22 Pictures Of People Taking Pictures Of Art At The Museum Of Modern Art Paired With Quotes From Social Media Theorists Nathan Jurgenson And Robert Horning Somewhat Haphazardly Sele... | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
SELFIES ARE DEEP // ART IS SHIT
BeerBergman's insight:

“Virality, unlike celebrity, isn’t about exclusivity or personal talent; it’s about moving information continually. Wanting to go viral is not the same as wanting to become famous. Whereas a famous person has become a someone, a viral self is always in process of becoming, always proving itself. But it needs only to be circulating; it doesn’t need to climb.”

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