Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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Who's afraid of the 'global poor'?

Who's afraid of the 'global poor'? | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Arguing against David Goodhart (whose controversial new book The British Dream: The Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration has recently been reviewed on openDemocracy), Lugo-Ocando remarked that the reason for the low standard of living for many people in the UK is not that migrants occupy a disproportionately high number of jobs, but is a result of the neo-liberal economic model which requires modes of working that are low-wage, insecure and often exploitative.

These concerns were considered in more conceptual terms in a keynote address by Bridget Anderson, Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society at Oxford University (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford, in which she posed the question: ‘who is the migrant?’ Neither a French banker working in the city, nor an Australian entrepreneur with a multi-million pound business, the migrant is predominantly perceived as poor, racially ‘other’ and non-English speaking. According to Anderson, this perception reflects a wide-reaching fear of the global poor, which demands examination if the political traction of the migrant figure is to be affirmatively appropriated.
BeerBergman's insight:

"This article was first published on 15 July 2013."

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This article makes much sense, a must read, since I suspect that the analysis of the British situation reflects a western-european problem.

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"Approaching immigration in a vacuum results only in the historically ineffectual battle between negative and positive images of migrants and the extent to which they enhance or undermine Britain’s economic and cultural value."

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"Demonstrating the damaging impact of punitive approaches to migration on valued concepts of citizenship, democracy and welfare might help reorient the debate over immigration away from the ‘Us and Them’ paradigm articulated by Anderson towards a shared vision of the kind of society we want to live in. "

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"The ‘naturalness’ of national belonging is one of the key ways in which migrants become the global scapegoats for the failures of global capitalism."

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"The idea of neighbourliness was raised by conference participants as an alternative to the binary opposition between citizen and non-citizen that polarises the debate over migration. This does not entail a wholesale rejection of the concept of national citizenship, which is an enduringly important mode of belonging; not least for refugees unable to return to their country of origin who wish to make a permanent life elsewhere. Instead, neighbourliness suggests an ethical orientation towards others – regardless of political or social status – which recalls philosopher Emmanuel Levinas’s repeated assertion that ‘the other is the neighbour’. In this sense we might also consider ourselves ‘neighbours’ with others the world over, and in doing so overcome those divisions which reduce migrants to symbols of anxiety and fear.  "

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Book Review: Community Engagement 2.0? Dialogues on the Future of the Civic in the Disrupted University

Book Review: Community Engagement 2.0? Dialogues on the Future of the Civic in the Disrupted University | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The subject area of the volume is particularly pertinent, since it involves questions of what is the civic in modern societies, what is a community in an online learning environment, and what teaching is and should be given the current trends and student expectations. Overall, despite some sceptical voices, the contributors seem to be rather positive about the online shift, seeing it as easing access to education, forming new communities, and expanding outreach and engagement, since students, belonging to online education communities, can simultaneously transfer their new knowledge and skills to their physical communities, improving student retention and graduation rates etc.
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A Global Look At The Future of Work | The Aristocracy of HR

A Global Look At The Future of Work | The Aristocracy of HR | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

One thing is for sure: we will have to rethink the role of work and rewarding work sooner than later. And it will be tough, but it may also create new opportunities.

BeerBergman's insight:

"HR will have to transform more rapidly in the next 10 years than it has the past thirty to keep up with societal and technological advances should Ms. Popcorn’s predictions hold true. Will there be whole HR departments run by robots in 2025? I don’t think so, but do I believe that we will see more and more outsourcing of functions that are better delivered by technology or people specifically dedicated to that one function? Yes.  As far as the talent goes, we are all reported to be free agents by 2025 and solely responsible for marketing ourselves to companies for work. The idea that there are no more defined roles within an organization filled with professionals with a finite set of skills creates complexities for recruitment teams and every other facet of HR as we know it today."

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Collaborative Economy: A Transformative Lens, Not a Start-Up Trend - Collaborative Consumption

Collaborative Economy: A Transformative Lens, Not a Start-Up Trend - Collaborative Consumption | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
The term ‘sharing’ does not accurately describe other marketplaces such as Etsy, Coursera or Kickstarter. People connect them with this family of ideas because they connect supply and demand or directly match needs and wants in ways that bypass traditional corporate/institutional structures.
The reason why I like the term ‘collaborative economy’ is it more accurately describes what I believe will become the defining characteristic for the decade – the shift from centralized institutions towards decentralized connected communities. ‘Sharing’ ventures are just the first wave of what will come.
BeerBergman's insight:

Excellent article!

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The Documented Life

We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them.
BeerBergman's insight:

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

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"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

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"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 12, 2014 6:07 PM

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

***

"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

***

"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind | MIT Technology Review

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind | MIT Technology Review | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
arxiv.org/abs/1506.03022
BeerBergman's insight:

"Two versions of this setup are shown above. In the left-hand example, the uncolored nodes see more than half of their neighbors as colored. In the right-hand example, this is not true for any of the uncolored nodes.

But here’s the thing: the structure of the network is the same in both cases. The only thing that changes is the nodes that are colored.  

This is the majority illusion—the local impression that a specific attribute is common when the global truth is entirely different."

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BeerBergman's comment, July 5, 2015 4:49 PM
And the original case can be found here : http://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.03022v1.pdf
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This is what happens when you create an online community without any rules

This is what happens when you create an online community without any rules | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
8chan, the more-lawless, more-libertarian, more “free” follow-up to 4chan, disappeared from the Internet under predictable circumstances Monday: Multiple people complained to 8chan’s registrar that the message board hosted child porn.

8chan has since resurfaced at a new URL, 8ch.net, and purportedly recovered its original domain. But that doesn’t erase the inevitable lesson of the matter: When you create an Internet community with virtually no rules, things are bound to go down the drain.
BeerBergman's insight:

Freedom of speech is a hot topic, these days after #jesuischarlie ... And more will probably follow.

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Art at Arm’s Length: A History of the Selfie

Art at Arm’s Length: A History of the Selfie | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
It’s become a new visual genre—a type of self-portraiture formally distinct from all others in history.
BeerBergman's insight:

Excellent analysis of a new genre, the #selfie. A must read. Extract.

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"We live in the age of the selfie. A fast self-portrait, made with a smartphone’s camera and immediately distributed and inscribed into a network, is an instant visual communication of where we are, what we’re doing, who we think we are, and who we think is watching. Selfies have changed aspects of social interaction, body language, self-awareness, privacy, and humor, altering temporality, irony, and public behavior. It’s become a new visual genre—a type of self-portraiture formally distinct from all others in history. Selfies have their own structural autonomy. This is a very big deal for art.

Genres arise relatively rarely. Portraiture is a genre. So is still-life, landscape, animal painting, history painting. (They overlap, too: A portrait might be in a seascape.) A genre possesses its own formal logic, with tropes and structural wisdom, and lasts a long time, until all the problems it was invented to address have been fully addressed. (Genres are distinct from styles, which come and go: There are Expressionist portraits, Cubist portraits, Impressionist portraits, Norman Rockwell portraits. Style is the endless variation within genre.)"

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