Web 2.0 et société
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Web 2.0 et société
La société en mouvement « 2.0 » : quels enjeux, quelles opportunités, quel avenir ?
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Petite histoire des couleurs de nos écrans - Rue89

Petite histoire des couleurs de nos écrans - Rue89 | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Oui, c’est aussi lié à cette idée du « monde algorithmique » (« algorithmic lifeworld ») que je développe.

Si une grande partie de notre culture visuelle est générée par les mathématiques et les algorithmes, qu’est-ce que ça dit de notre mode de pensée ? Si nous utilisons les maths, une façon rationnelle de diviser des chiffres, pour comprendre les relations qui nous unissent et le monde qui nous entoure, qu’est-ce que ça change ? Qu’est-ce que ça change par rapport aux modèles antérieurs où la poésie, la nuance, le romantisme... jouaient un rôle plus important ?

Je pense que chez les jeunes artistes qui travaillent avec les couleurs numériques, dans le « glitch », il y a moins de romantisme, de sens d’enchantement. C’est souvent plus décalé, plus ironique, plus cynique... parce qu’ils travaillent avec un médium qui impose des paramètres très rigides sur ce qu’il est possible de faire.
BeerBergman's insight:

Article très intéressant, malgré un brin de "romantisme du passé" !

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Facebook Tests Giving Some News Feed Control to Users

Facebook Tests Giving Some News Feed Control to Users | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it

In recent years, Facebook has been increasingly strict about controlling what users see in their News Feeds and the order in which they see it – much to the annoyance…

BeerBergman's insight:

This might change the deal... 

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"While some users will celebrate this move, it’s a gamble for Facebook. The whole point of its News Feed algorithm is that it theoretically knows better than you what will keep you coming back."


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Why the web isn’t as meritocratic as you think

Social media may be easy to access, but communicating with people via social media isn’t always as easy as it might seem. Posting content online isn’t the same as getting it in front of them. It may be public, but a lot of effort is still needed to publicize what you post. In theory, social […]
BeerBergman's insight:

Old news, but well told story :-). Excerpt.

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"People’s experience of social media varies widely, depending heavily on how the people around them use these services. Most people don’t follow strangers randomly; they follow people they know, respect or are curious about. Because of countless historical reasons, people’s personal networks are shaped by race, class, religion, geography and language. This gets reproduced online and is often referred to as the “filter bubble”. As a result, just because people are all on one social media site together does not mean that they are exposed to each other’s content. How you see Instagram, the photo sharing service, is fundamentally different than how I see Instagram because we inevitably follow different people."

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How Social Media Silences Debate

How Social Media Silences Debate | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
People have always tended to surround themselves with like-minded people, but the Internet makes doing so easier than ever before, a study finds.
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting, not surprising: will time teach us to be different in the future or are social organization and norms universal and reluctant to change? Excerpt.

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"The Internet, it seems, is contributing to the polarization of America, as people surround themselves with people who think like them and hesitate to say anything different. Internet companies magnify the effect, by tweaking their algorithms to show us more content from people who are similar to us.

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The Dangers of Letting Algorithms Decide Who Is Eligible for Welfare

The Dangers of Letting Algorithms Decide Who Is Eligible for Welfare | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
Public services are becoming increasingly algorithmic, a reality that has spawned hyperbolic comparisons to RoboCop and Minority Report, enforcement droids and pre-cogs. But the future of high-tech policymaking looks less like science fiction and more like Google’s PageRank algorithm. For example, according to the Chicago Tribune, Robert McDaniel, a 22-year-old...
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What is “fairness”?

What is “fairness”? | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
What happens when technology decides?
BeerBergman's insight:

Another interesting question posed by danah boyd: the ethics of fairness in a tech-mediated world. Excerpt.

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"The market-driven logic of fairness is fundamentally about individuals at the expense of the social fabric. Not surprisingly, the tech industryvery neoliberal in cultural ideologyembraces market-driven fairness as the most desirable form of fairness because it is the model that is most about individual empowerment. But, of course, this form of empowerment is at the expense of others. And, significantly, at the expense of those who have been historically marginalized and ostracized."

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I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me | Gadget Lab | WIRED

I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me | Gadget Lab | WIRED | Web 2.0 et société | Scoop.it
I like everything. Or at least I did, for 48 hours. Literally everything Facebook sent my way, I liked---even if I hated it.
BeerBergman's insight:

Histoire vraie, hilarante/triste (qui a dit que c'est la fin de l'époque bipolaire ?) et prévisible en même temps: que se passe-t-il quand on "like" tout ce qui se présente sur ton flux Facebook? L'histoire, à part que c'est une expérience intéressante, est bien écrite et vaut votre attention. Extrait.

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"See, Facebook uses algorithms to decide what shows up in your feed. It isn’t just a parade of sequential updates from your friends and the things you’ve expressed an interest in. In 2014 the News Feed is a highly-curated presentation, delivered to you by a complicated formula based on the actions you take on the site, and across the web. I wanted to see how my Facebook experience would change if I constantly rewarded the robots making these decisions for me, if I continually said, “good job, robot, I like this.” I also decided I’d only do this on Facebook itself—trying to hit every Like button I came across on the open web would just be too daunting. But even when I kept the experiment to the site itself, the results were dramatic."

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via @KarenPatel

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