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Rescooped by David Kuykendall from The science toolbox
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Direct and indirect effects of climate change on soil microbial and soil microbial-plant interactions: What lies ahead?

Direct and indirect effects of climate change on soil microbial and soil microbial-plant interactions: What lies ahead? | Weather affects spread of deadly disease of pigs | Scoop.it
Global change is altering species distributions and thus interactions among organisms. Organisms live in concert with thousands of other species, some beneficial, some pathogenic, some which have little to no effect in complex communities. Since natural communities are composed of organisms with very different life history traits and dispersal ability it is unlikely they will all respond to climatic change in a similar way. Disjuncts in plant-pollinator and plant-herbivore interactions under global change have been relatively well described, but plant-soil microorganism and soil microbe-microbe relationships have received less attention. Since soil microorganisms regulate nutrient transformations, provide plants with nutrients, allow co-existence among neighbors, and control plant populations, changes in soil microorganism-plant interactions could have significant ramifications for plant community composition and ecosystem function. In this paper we explore how climatic change affects soil microbes and soil microbe-plant interactions directly and indirectly, discuss what we see as emerging and exciting questions and areas for future research, and discuss what ramifications changes in these interactions may have on the composition and function of ecosystems.

Via Francis Martin, Niklaus Grunwald
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Rescooped by David Kuykendall from Plants and Microbes
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PLOS Pathogens: Recognition and Activation Domains Contribute to Allele-Specific Responses of an Arabidopsis NLR Receptor to an Oomycete Effector Protein (2015)

PLOS Pathogens: Recognition and Activation Domains Contribute to Allele-Specific Responses of an Arabidopsis NLR Receptor to an Oomycete Effector Protein (2015) | Weather affects spread of deadly disease of pigs | Scoop.it

In plants, specific recognition of pathogen effector proteins by nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) receptors leads to activation of immune responses. RPP1, an NLR from Arabidopsis thaliana, recognizes the effector ATR1, from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, by direct association via C-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Two RPP1 alleles, RPP1-NdA and RPP1-WsB, have narrow and broad recognition spectra, respectively, with RPP1-NdA recognizing a subset of the ATR1 variants recognized by RPP1-WsB. In this work, we further characterized direct effector recognition through random mutagenesis of an unrecognized ATR1 allele, ATR1-Cala2, screening for gain-of-recognition phenotypes in a tobacco hypersensitive response assay. We identified ATR1 mutants that a) confirm surface-exposed residues contribute to recognition by RPP1, and b) are recognized by and activate the narrow-spectrum allele RPP1-NdA, but not RPP1-WsB, in co-immunoprecipitation and bacterial growth inhibition assays. Thus, RPP1 alleles have distinct recognition specificities, rather than simply different sensitivity to activation. Using chimeric RPP1 constructs, we showed that RPP1-NdA LRRs were sufficient for allele-specific recognition (association with ATR1), but insufficient for receptor activation in the form of HR. Additional inclusion of the RPP1-NdA ARC2 subdomain, from the central NB-ARC domain, was required for a full range of activation specificity. Thus, cooperation between recognition and activation domains seems to be essential for NLR function.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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This is an example of cutting-edge model plant Arabidopsis pathogenesis/resistance research.

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Rescooped by David Kuykendall from Plants and Microbes
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36th New Phytologist Symposium: Cell biology at the plant–microbe interface, Munich, Germany 29 Nov – 1 Dec 2015

36th New Phytologist Symposium: Cell biology at the plant–microbe interface, Munich, Germany 29 Nov – 1 Dec 2015 | Weather affects spread of deadly disease of pigs | Scoop.it

Symposium aim - We aim to organize a cutting edge meeting focused on the application of cell biology approaches to understand the mechanisms that diverse microbes use to manipulate plant cells to benefit their life styles. The meeting will bring together researchers working on a broad spectrum of microbes across different taxa (bacteria, fungi, oomycetes) that form a variety of different interactions (pathogenic, symbiotic) with plant organs/tissues (leaves, roots). With the explosion in microbial/host genome sequences and the identification of genes/proteins involved in these interactions, the focus of the field is moving rapidly towards using cell and molecular biology techniques and new imaging technologies to understand the molecular dialogue between plants and their microbial pathogens/symbionts. The need for a conference on this topic, the first of its type, is evidenced by the growing prominence of cell biology in the literature. Students and scientists in this field face many challenges in the application and interpretation of cell biology data and would greatly benefit from a specialized conference on this topic. The symposium will bring together a broad representation of researchers focussing on different cell biology aspects and will allow researchers across the different disciplines to present and exchange their recent advances in this important topic of plant biology.

Symposium rationale and scope - Plant organs are subject to colonisation and manipulation by microbes, and this requires reprogramming of host cell biology to accommodate microbial structures within tissues/cells and to mediate responses for proper immunity or for symbiosis. Host cell biology changes during microbial invasion were first reported more than 100 years ago based on microscopy studies revealing that many microbes project structures (haustoria, arbuscules) into plant cells that are enveloped with a specialized plant-­derived membrane and evidence now suggests an intimate molecular exchange takes place across these membrane interfaces. However, recent identification of some of the molecular players in these interactions is only now providing appropriate tools to analyse these events. The symposium will focus on advances in understanding the molecular interactions that occur between a microbe and its host at a cellular and subcellular level, such as:

how root and leaf cells accommodate microbial structures through biogenesis of specialized plant derived membranes, microbial invasion and spreading strategies (via stomata, roots, vasculature, plasmodesmata), the dynamic localization of cell surface and cytosolic receptors recognizing microbial signals the reprogramming of host membrane trafficking (focal accumulation, secretion), the delivery of microbial molecules from fungal and oomycete species into plant cells.

With recent advances in high resolution/throughput bioimaging we are gaining new insights into the cell biology mechanisms and pathways of plant cell interactions with diverse microbes. Therefore the symposium provides a timely and important opportunity to overview the application of these technologies to plant–microbe interactions, and to discuss recent discoveries emerging from diverse host–microbe interactions illustrating common underlying principles and differences of strategies used by the microbes to gain access to plant tissues/cells. The symposium will certainly trigger a wealth of discussions, exchange of findings and methodologies, and will promote new lines of research and ideas in this rapidly expanding field.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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