Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights
5.8K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
onto Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights
Scoop.it!

6 Important Product, Design and Strategic Decisions For Wearable Makers

6 Important Product, Design and Strategic Decisions For Wearable Makers | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

It is a super exciting time for wearable entrepreneurs! The early generation of wearables has offered a promising step towards what could be achieved over time with the new generation of wearable products.


The wearable industry is still in its infancy. Although wearable makers have spent significant effort to marry hardware and software technologies and build cool products, there is still a lot to be discovered, learned, and applied in this industry.


As a wearable maker, there are six elements to consider and successfully navigate in order to build a winning product that will be adopted by the majority of the population:...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good overview of the challenges facing world of technology makers.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 28, 2014 2:20 AM

Success strategies for wearable technology makers in the future.

Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights
Internet of things and wearable technology insights, research, innovations & product news
Curated by Jeff Domansky
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

Making wearables more useful and smart homes less of a chore

Making wearables more useful and smart homes less of a chore | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

While many companies, big and small, have been jumping into the wearables space in recent years, the use-cases for these devices often feels superficial — with fitness perhaps the most compelling scenario at this nascent stage. Yet smartwatches have far richer potential than merely performing a spot of sweat tracking.

The other problem with the current crop of smartwatches is the experience of using apps on wrist-mounted devices does not always live up to the promise of getting stuff done faster or more efficiently. Just having to load an app on this type of supplementary device can feel like an imposition.

If the primary selling point of a smartwatch is really convenience/glanceability the watch wearer really does not want to have to be squinting at lots of tiny icons and manually loading data to get the function they need in a given moment. A wearable needs to be a whole lot smarter to make it worth the wearing vs just using a smartphone.

At the same time, other connected devices populating the growing Internet of Things can feel pretty dumb right now — given the interface demands they also place on users. Such as, for example, connected lightbulbs like Philips Hue that require the user to open an app on their phone just in order to turn a lightbulb on or off, or change the colour of the light.

Which is pretty much the opposite of convenient, and why we’ve already seen startups trying to fix the problems IoT devices are creating via sensor-powered automation....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Wearables need to become more useful and connected devices easier to use in the home for the market to grow.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 15, 7:08 PM

Wearables need to become more useful and connected devices easier to use in the home for the market to grow.

Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

Growth of the Internet of Things | Cool Infographics

Growth of the Internet of Things | Cool Infographics | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

The current projection data from Cisco is that the IoT (Internet of Things) will reach 50 Billion devices by the year 2020! Visualized by the NCTA (National Cable & Telecommunications Association) as the Growth in the Internet of Things.

Today’s Internet is driven by wired and wireless networks, keeping us connected throughout our daily lives. With the advent of new digital devices that constantly link us to the Internet, these networks have become much more than just a simple vehicle for information and communications. They now enable us to track our daily habits, monitor our health, manage home energy use and track nearly any other data we can imagine. These devices make up what we call the Internet of Things – a web of connected objects that are linked via networks that can interact with each other and with us.

The Internet isn’t merely developing, it’s exploding, and the numbers prove it. Take a look at our graphic below — it shows the advancing surge of connected devices using the Internet.

Today, there are more connected devices than there are human beings on the planet. This expansion isn’t just from cell phones, tablets and computers – it’s thanks to toothbrushes, stovetops and millions of other devices that now have IP addresses. Estimates show that there will be over 50 billion connected devices by 2020.

Fast, ubiquitous Wi-Fi and increasing home broadband speeds will drive the Internet of Things and the ever-expanding web....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The Internet of things keeps on growing as this infographic shows – 50 billion devices by 2020.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 11, 6:01 PM

The Internet of things keeps on growing as this infographic shows – 50 billion devices by 2020.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Wearable Technology at Work for Enterprise Business, Part 2 - Heavy Machinery | EnterpriseWear Blog

Wearable Technology at Work for Enterprise Business, Part 2 - Heavy Machinery | EnterpriseWear Blog | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Welcome to Part 2 of our latest blog series giving you early access to the upcoming BrainXchange-Hewlett Packard Enterprise white paper, which examines several real-life use cases of wearables at work in different enterprise operations.

 

In Part 1, we shared an example of how an advanced collaboration platform like HPE’s MyRoom/VRG coupled with wearable technology could revolutionize the automotive recall process for a major auto manufacturer.  

 

Today we will see how a heavy machinery manufacturer could use wearables to provide remote support and on-the-spot training to its partners and customers. The complete white paper will be available for free download on May 18th. Sign up today to receive the white paper directly in your inbox when it goes live.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Emily Friedman continues her look at wearable technology in heavy machinery applications.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

AB | Smart, Automated Craft Beer Home Brewery

Using only the highest quality of beer brewing ingredients, you'll be able to select your recipe from a library of hundreds of master recipes and, with the push of a few buttons, you'll have perfect beer in as little as one week. Fully customizable and community-integrated, it will change the way you both brew and experience beer for the rest of your life!...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Now that's tasty, smart technology!

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 30, 4:53 PM

Now that's tasty, smart technology!

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Consumers Still Wary Of Wearables

Consumers Still Wary Of Wearables | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Consumers still aren’t completely sold on the idea of wearables. According to a survey of more than 1,000 American consumers by Colloquy, nearly two-thirds (63%) believe wearables are too expensive. At the same time, more than half (52%) said they don’t know enough to fully understand them.

 

“The perception is because of the newness [of the devices], you’re going to pay more,” Jeff Berry, Colloquy’s research director, tellsMarketing Daily. “The ‘too expensive’ comment may be more about the perception of the devices than the reality for consumers.”

 

Also, a third (35%) of consumers said they viewed the devices as a passing fad that may not be worth the investment....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Consumers still wary of wearables according to most recent research.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 9, 2:19 AM

Consumers aren't sold on wearables yet, according to research.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Can you take the Internet out of the Internet of Things?

Can you take the Internet out of the Internet of Things? | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things and the Internet might seem inextricably linked, but, increasingly, there are questions centered around how IoT devices should work with one another — and what happens when the Internet connection goes down?

Users also are concerned with the privacy implications of having their data stored on a corporation’s servers, and they don’t like having an Internet connection as a potential point of failure. These reactions are rational, but reminiscent of online shopping circa 2000, which, ironically, might now be more secure than shopping in physical retail stores.

To understand why device makers are relying on an Internet connection and cloud services, we need to look at how our IoT devices work. We need to understand data sources, processing, device to device communication and, ultimately, how one device can leverage another device....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Thought-provoking post and I liked the comparison to where e-commerce was in 2000 is where we are today with IoT. Soon it will just be integrated into what we do and how we use the Internet and devices at home and on mobile.

more...
Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 10, 8:35 AM

Thought-provoking post and I liked the comparison to where e-commerce was in 2000 is where we are today with IoT. Soon it will just be integrated into what we do and how we use the Internet and devices at home and on mobile.

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 10, 9:20 AM

Thought-provoking post and I liked the comparison to where e-commerce was in 2000 is where we are today with IoT. Soon it will just be integrated into what we do and how we use the Internet and devices at home and on mobile.

Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, March 15, 3:39 AM

Thought-provoking post and I liked the comparison to where e-commerce was in 2000 is where we are today with IoT. Soon it will just be integrated into what we do and how we use the Internet and devices at home and on mobile.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Here's how the Internet of Things will explode by 2020

Here's how the Internet of Things will explode by 2020 | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Here are some key points from the report: In total, we project there will be 34 billion devices connected to the internet by 2020, up from 10 billion in 2015. IoT devices will account for 24 billion, while traditional computing devices (e.g. smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, etc.) will comprise 10 bifllion.

 

Nearly $6 trillion will be spent on IoT solutions over the next five years.

 

Businesses will be the top adopter of IoT solutions. They see three ways the IoT can improve their bottom line by 1) lowering operating costs; 2) increasing productivity; and 3) expanding to new markets or developing new product offerings....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is poised to go gangbusters.

more...
Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, March 15, 3:38 AM

The Internet of Things (IoT) is poised to go gangbusters.

delphine crommelinck's curator insight, March 23, 5:22 AM

The Internet of Things (IoT) is poised to go gangbusters.

Wes Thomas's curator insight, March 28, 11:08 PM

The Internet of Things (IoT) is poised to go gangbusters.

Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How the Internet of Things is becoming the 'Internet of Commerce’

How the Internet of Things is becoming the 'Internet of Commerce’ | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

From a purely technical perspective, adding mobile payment hardware (NFC) to a device is easy, which is why major tech companies have been doing it since 2007.

The challenge, however, was creating safe services, at scale, that could make payments as digital as the people who will use them.

MasterCard has answered the call through with a variety of mobile payment innovations, from its digital wallet service MasterPass, to contactless technologies that make transactions faster, to commerce platforms like Android PayTM, Apple PayTM and Samsung Pay, even advanced tokenization services.

The future of payments doesn't just live on a smartphone, though....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lots of new developments on the mobile and IoT payments horizon.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 28, 9:41 PM

Lots of new developments on the mobile and IoT payments horizon.

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 10, 8:36 AM

Lots of new developments on the mobile and IoT payments horizon.

delphine crommelinck's curator insight, March 23, 5:24 AM

Lots of new developments on the mobile and IoT payments horizon.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Wearables Market Grows 172% In A Year; 78 Million Devices Shipped (21 Million Fitbits)

Wearables Market Grows 172% In A Year; 78 Million Devices Shipped (21 Million Fitbits) | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Wearable Internet-connected devices are shipping by the millions, with a focus on fitness leading the way.

 

More global year-end numbers just came out showing that the wearables market grew 127% in the last quarter compared to the same quarter a year ago.

 

And the numbers are impressive.

 

During the holiday quarter, 27 million wearables shipped, according to the Worldwide Quarterly Device Tracker by IDC, which I consider to be one of the best and most accurate research and tracking companies.

 

For the full year, suppliers shipped 78 million wearable devices, an increase of 172% from the year before....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Wearables market sales grows 172% in one year; 78 Million devices shipped including 21 million Fitbits.

more...
Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 10, 8:37 AM

Wearables market sales grows 172% in one year; 78 Million devices shipped including 21 million Fitbits.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

What’s Next for Wearable Tech?

What’s Next for Wearable Tech? | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

The wearables market is just starting to explode, but we're already taking it for granted. And it's hard not to wonder where it will go next – especially considering where we've been....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

HaLow Is The Natural Next Step In The Evolution Of IoT

HaLow Is The Natural Next Step In The Evolution Of IoT | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it
The Wi-Fi Alliance recently announced the long-awaited Wi-Fi HaLow standard for products incorporating IEEE 802.11ah wireless networking technology (HaLow is pronounced just like the title of the popular video game from Microsoft).

HaLow extends a flavor of Wi-Fi into the 900 MHz band, which provides greater range than the pre-existing 2.4 GHz standard, provides better connectivity through barriers such as walls and promises extensibility in the development of low-power Internet of Things (IoT) applications, such as Smart Home sensors and wearables.
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Another welcome move to standards in IoT.

more...
Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 10, 8:37 AM

Another welcome move to standards in IoT.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Wearable Usage Will Grow by Nearly 60% This Year - eMarketer

Wearable Usage Will Grow by Nearly 60% This Year - eMarketer | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

The next several years will continue to see double-digit growth in the number of Americans using wearable devices, according to eMarketer's first wearables forecast. In 2015, 39.5 million US adults 18 and over will use wearables, including smartwatches and fitness trackers. That's a jump of 57.7% over 2014. While penetration among US adults is just 16.0% this year, 


eMarketer expects that to double by 2018, to 81.7 million users.eMarketer defines wearable users as those who wear accessories or clothing at least once per month that are embedded with internet-connected electronics and exchange data with a manufacturer or other connected device....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Almost two in five internet users will use wearables by 2019.

more...
Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 10, 8:38 AM

Almost two in five internet users will use wearables by 2019.

Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

Why The Fashion World Hates Wearables | Co Design

Why The Fashion World Hates Wearables | Co Design | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it
Wearables are one of the most exciting developments in technology, and have inspired the fashion industry in some intriguing ways. But there’s still plenty of skepticism about everything from battery life to appearance. Some even wonder if computers strapped to our bodies 24/7 could have adverse health effects (although, to be fair, it’s hard to see how wearables would be any different from an iPhone in that regard).


TO PUT IT BLUNTLY, WEARABLES ARE STILL UGLY.
Wearables are taking time to gather momentum. Google Glass was disbanded, and Apple hasn't disclosed how many watches it is selling. Even if sales are stronger than analysts estimate, the Watch hasn't exactly gotten glowing reviews. Even the most favorable reviews suggest it is not a device for "tech novices." Walt Mossberg at Re/Code went further, dubbing one wearable a "celibacy band."

If the people who test gadgets for a living are having trouble adapting, it’s safe to say we still have a few years before wearables will be relevant to typical consumers, much less those who care about looking stylish....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Impractical, mostly ugly and expensive. After all the hype, are wearables losing their wind? 

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 8, 9:08 PM

Impractical, mostly ugly and expensive. After all the hype, are wearables losing their wind? 

lundí's curator insight, March 4, 8:07 PM

Impractical, mostly ugly and expensive. After all the hype, are wearables losing their wind? 

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 10, 8:38 AM

Impractical, mostly ugly and expensive. After all the hype, are wearables losing their wind? 

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

5 Forward-Looking Wearables That Are Improving Lives

5 Forward-Looking Wearables That Are Improving Lives | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Wearable brands are recognizing that in order to sell products and build loyalty, the device needs to provide real-time, meaningful value that improves people’s lives on a daily and consistent basis.

Delivering meaningful information starts with personalization and monitoring behavior in order to provide relevant notifications, stats and content. The foundation of this personalization is precise location and the context it provides.

Here are 5 forward-looking devices that are getting it right....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Here are profiles of five interesting wearables companies making commitment to a better life

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Things Needs Design, Not Just Technology

The Internet of Things Needs Design, Not Just Technology | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Gartner Research predicts that the typical family home will contain as many as 500 networked devices by 2020. Similarly, Ericsson forecasts 50 billion connected “things” by the same date. Reaching these lofty projections over the next four years, however, will require a fundamental reorientation in the way that technologists and product designers work together to create successful “connected” personal devices and home appliance products. This evolution to “Internet of Things (IoT) 2.0” will be difficult for many companies to achieve — not for lack of technological expertise but because they’ll fail to recognize the value of design in connected product development.

Machine-to-machine (M2M) connectivity — the forerunner of consumer-focused IoT — has been around for decades. Overwhelmingly, those IoT 1.0 applications pushed technology to address B2B market requirements.

Product design considerations in the IoT 1.0 world are not critical to persuading customers to adopt offerings. Enterprise IoT buyers seldom require great design, because most often the buyer is not the product’s end user. Fleet logistics companies, for example, monitor the condition and location of their vehicles. Their developers focus on meeting operational and environmental requirements, caring little about the physical appearance or user experience of a dashboard- or engine-compartment-mounted device that monitors vehicle data....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Better design would lead to better Internet of things products and higher consumer adoption write Scott Nelson and Paul Metaxatos in the Harvard Business Review.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 3, 10:21 PM

Better design would lead to better Internet of things products and higher consumer adoption write Scott Nelson and Paul Metaxatos in the Harvard Business Review.

Ken Bracken's curator insight, May 4, 4:20 AM
What really concerns me about this, is not that connectivity is a bad thing. It's that I'm not sure if I trust my $15 kettle I bought in Tesco to have adequate security software. 

Many of the biggest security hacks have come through weakest links in the chain being attacked. Be they instances such as Target's data breach or HeartBleed. Connecting everything in your home without adequate security is madness. But I look forward to my fully functioning smart house.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Wearable Technology at Work for Enterprise Business, Part 1 - Automotive | EnterpriseWear Blog

Wearable Technology at Work for Enterprise Business, Part 1 - Automotive | EnterpriseWear Blog | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

At this stage in the adoption of wearable technology in enterprise, we’re all hungry for use cases to inspire and teach us. While news articles and press releases provide us with a taste of which companies are openly experimenting with wearables and the basic applications, they are by no means complete case studies.

BrainXchange recently wrote a white paper in collaboration with Hewlett Packard Enterprise examining several real-life use cases of wearables at work in different enterprise operations. These examples were gathered from HPE’s work with its real enterprise customers, and are presented in the paper – beyond the mere facts of each use case – to give you real, valuable insight into the pain points faced by today’s enterprises and how wearable solutions like HPE’s MyRoom/VRG platform are making a big difference.

Our newest blog series – of which this is Part 1 – will give you early access to the white paper content before it is made available for free download in its entirety on Wednesday, May 18th. (Sign up here to receive the paper directly in your inbox once it goes live.) Each week for six weeks, we will publish one use case from the paper. So read on to see how an advanced collaboration platform coupled with wearable technology can revolutionize remote support and eLearning for a major automotive company, and keep reading EnterpriseWear for more pre-releases and exclusive content!...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

First of a six-part series on wearable technology and work for enterprise business.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

We've Been Approaching The Internet Of Things All Wrong

We've Been Approaching The Internet Of Things All Wrong | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

For years now, we've been hearing about how the Internet of Things will connect every object in our homes. And for years, the vast majority of those objects stay dumb.

"What companies are struggling with when it comes to the broad label of the IoT on the consumer side is what the actual problem trying to be solved is," says Rob Chandhouk, president of the sensor startup Helium. "Look at Samsung's new smart fridge, which they're marketing as the hub for your home. Do you think of your refrigerator as a hub?"

Chandhouk doesn't believe that the IoT will be making any big breakthroughs with consumers any time soon. Instead, Helium is betting big IoT's real utility is on the commercial and industrial side of things. It looks like numerous big players agree, based on a recent $20 million Series B funding round including Alphabet's investment arm GV, previously known as Google Ventures. But it's another investor in the latest round that gives us our clearest hint of where IoT is going: Munich Re, an insurance and risk management company....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Helium is betting that IoT will move to commercial and industrial applications before consumer products get a foothold. And there are some good examples that show the direction seems right.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 29, 11:17 PM

Helium is betting that IoT will move to commercial and industrial applications before consumer products get a foothold. And there are some good examples that show the direction seems right.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Yup, even your pet’s favorite toy is connected now (Boy Genius Report)

Yup, even your pet’s favorite toy is connected now (Boy Genius Report) | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it
The "Internet of Things" has officially extended beyond our lives and into the lives of our pets.Everything has to be smart and connected these days, and that now includes pet toys as well. But the Petcube Interactive Wi-Fi Pet Camera isn't just a pet toy, it's also an interactive wireless home camera. The device latches onto your home Wi-Fi network and lets you connect from anywhere using the free iOS or Android app. You can watch your pet, listen in on what's going on at home, talk using the integrated speaker, and control the built-in laser toy that your dog or cat will go nuts over.It's an awesome product and best of all, it's the same price as most single-purpose home cameras....
Jeff Domansky's insight:
Ruff, ruff! Even your pet’s favorite toy is connected now, , a post from the blog Boy Genius Report on Bloglovin’
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from snow
Scoop.it!

This Is the Year Wearables Will Stop Being So Ugly | WIRED

This Is the Year Wearables Will Stop Being So Ugly | WIRED | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

FITNESS TRACKERS ARE getting a whole lot more stylish.

 

The latest batch of wearables lets you have your fitness tracking and your fashion, too. They’re ditching neutral monochrome and sporty, almost utilitarian, styling for a rainbow of colors, faux gems, and other flair that make them suitable for any time of day, and any occasion. The change reflects the maturation of the market and the growing sophistication of consumer tastes.

 

“When the first activity trackers started coming out, that sporty look was what people wanted. Now we’re moving away from that,” Garmin media relations associate Amy Noury said. The company just launched its first smartwatch, the $250 Vivoactive. It’s a handsome, sleek gadget that resembles the Pebble smartwatch and builds on its general purpose activity trackers, the Vivofit and Vivosmart. It’s GPS enabled and can track activities like cycling, running, swimming, or golf. Garmin also updated its Vivofit fitness tracker with additional features and a host of bright silicon strap colors and styles, including ones patterned with designs by Jonathan Adler.

 

We started seeing more attractive fitness trackers from the likes of Withings last year, but the trend has firmly established itself here at CES....

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc., lundí
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Let's hope that more design and creativity come into wearables this year!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

How Sony's Stealthy Wearables Start-Up Built a Watch Out of E-Paper

How Sony's Stealthy Wearables Start-Up Built a Watch Out of E-Paper | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

What sounds like a simple idea was actually the foundational design challenge, since e-paper is rarely used this way. "E-paper is usually used for flat, unbending displays, but it is very important to wear a watch comfortably," Sugiue says. "The whole surface of the FES Watch’s strap is also made of e-paper, but the wearer can still open the buckle, put their hand through with ease and close the buckle, fitting the watch around their wrist comfortably. It is quite a natural thing for a watch, but this is not so easy to achieve for digital devices." 

 

While Sony would not disclose specifically how it achieved the bendability, Sugiue says it was through careful study of the e-paper's characteristics and learning how to manipulate it.

 

The watch conforms to the classic shape of a conventional watch—a round face and band—but it's covered with an e-paper display, which has 24 different face patterns that wearers can engage at will by pressing a button on the watch's side. "It’s something like a brand-new canvas, and is able to change its own skin to show a number of different chraracteristics," Satoshi Yoshiizumi, Takt Project's principal, says. 

 

"Therefore, it is like the 'material of watch' which has a silhouette of a watch, but stimulates your imagination and curiosity through trying various textures." Shaking the watch activates the display, which goes "dark" if there's no movement, conserving battery life....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The FES started out as an experimenthere's the story of how Sony's under-the-radar wearables team brought it to market. Some ideas and creativity are just too good to share! Recommended reading! 9/10

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

The Next Big Thing In Retail: Programmatic Commerce - Forbes

The Next Big Thing In Retail: Programmatic Commerce - Forbes | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Imagine this: you wake up in the morning and your coffee machine, as it pours you your first cup, tells you it’s almost out of your favourite blend. Rather than making a mental note to yourself to remember to buy some more on your next store visit, your machine instantly does the ordering for you – adding it to your shopping basket, along with the detergent that needs replacing, the toothpaste you’re running low on, and the mascara that is just about to dry out.

When you leave for work, you get an update that the order will be delivered to the trunk of your car that afternoon. You then get a notification that it’s your friend’s birthday, and based on social media data that your digital assistant has pulled, you are recommended an ideal present to buy. You automatically add that to the checkout also.

Welcome to the age of programmatic commerce: a world where mundane repeat purchases and those easily solved by data insights, are automatically done for you....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting concept coming soon to your IoT home.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 24, 9:34 PM

Programmatic commerce: interesting concept coming soon to your fridge, TV, lamp, dishwasher, and other devices in your IoT home.

delphine crommelinck's curator insight, March 23, 5:23 AM

Interesting concept coming soon to your IoT home.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

This Fashion Line Is The Wearable Equivalent Of A Robert Irwin Installation

This Fashion Line Is The Wearable Equivalent Of A Robert Irwin Installation | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Fashion designers like to look ahead, predicting the colors, prints, and silhouettes that will be in demand a year or two later. Becca McCharen aims much farther into the future, conceiving of designs that question how apparel can do more than simply "clothe" a person. She calls her fashion brand Chromat "structural experiments for the body."

"Coming from an architectural background, I see clothing as doing work for the body—an additional tool to enhance performance," she says.

For her AW16 collection—dubbed Lumina—the self-described "mad scientist" used Intel's Curie module (a button-sized wearable) and StretchSense's flexible sensors—which she likens to "rubber bands as Bluetooth"—to create a tech-infused collection that glows in response to movement....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Innovative wearables design Becca McCharen predicts future trends.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Fossil to launch over 100 wearables in 2016

Fossil to launch over 100 wearables in 2016 | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Fossil Group, whose portfolio of brands includes Adidas Originals, Burberry and Diesel, on Tuesday announced at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas that it would launch more than 100 connected devices in 2016.


Fossil’s new wearables will include activity trackers and smartwatches for many brands including Misfit, the wearable technology brand that Fossil acquired in November 2015. Fossil Group will launch new products throughout 2016 and all 100 styles will be available by the year-end holidays.
 
"We successfully launched wearables with one brand and 10 styles in 2015 and quickly ramped up to launch wearables for several brands in more than 100 styles in 2016," said Greg McKelvey, chief strategy and digital officer, Fossil Group. "Bringing Fossil Q to market helped us identify additional opportunity, and based on the positive consumer response, we are going big this year. Our retail partners will see the power of Fossil Group's scale and consumers will see the variety of functionality, style, colors and brands they desire."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Will wearables be a win for Fossil Group?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Now cows can choose when they want to be milked - by a robot

Now cows can choose when they want to be milked - by a robot | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Wearable technology, like the under-performing Google Glass, might still be a tough sell for humans. But it seems to be catching on with farm animals.


More accurately, farmers are embracing wearable devices that help them monitor their livestock, such as GPS collars that track animals out in the pasture or e-pills that sit in animals' stomachs to measure their digestion.


Other wearables allow farmers to take advantage of high-tech innovations like increased automation. For example, robotic milking pens that automatically milk cows that walk into them are quickly taking hold at family farms. Such robots operate with the help of an e-tag clipped to the animal's ear or an e-collar snapped around an animal's neck. The wearables help the robot identify the animals and give each one personalized care, without the help of humans....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Moo. Ain't technology wonderful?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Why Consumers Aren't Purchasing a Smart Watch - eMarketer

Why Consumers Aren't Purchasing a Smart Watch - eMarketer | Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights | Scoop.it

Usage of wearables, like smart watches, will grow by nearly two-thirds this year, per an eMarketer forecast. Still, cost is holding many consumers back from purchasing a device, according to December 2015 research.  


Kentico surveyed 1,000 internet users, ages 18 and older. More than two-thirds of internet users worldwide said that cost was one of the top reasons for not purchasing a smart watch.


Additionally, 38% of respondents said that another reason for not purchasing a smart watch was because there was not enough reasons to use it. This is likely because many smart watch capabilities, like sending and receiving emails or texts, as well as placing and receiving phone and video calls, can be done via a smartphone. In fact, 14% of internet users said they were dependent on their smartphone, and that was a reason for not purchasing a smart watch....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Still marketing challenges ahead for smart watches and wearables.

more...
No comment yet.