we ART
Follow
Find
2.2K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
onto we ART
Scoop.it!

ArtHERE: Connecting Spaces And Art

Whiteboard animation video for ArtHERE.org, a web platform that connects spaces and art, for crowd-sourced urban revitalization.
more...
No comment yet.
we ART
new Art attitudes developing.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

What do people say about capitalism in Times Square? (daily 1 of 5)

On September 20 I installed a 20ft wide by 9fit scoreboard that says "Capitalism Works for Me!" in Times Square and passers by could vote true or false. We are…
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

Does Capitalist make sense? obviously not for everyone... If it works for you, you are in the lucky group --the few who can enjoy it. Did you gave up anything of yourself to be part of the success story by the way? The American dream is in fact a dream, not a reality. In regard to being an artist, I could say I am free to express myself in a capitalist system, but I don't have opportunities to do so --no affordable studio, no place to expose freely, no support from the art institutions who end up supporting themselves more than anything else... Everywhere I share my artistic work I do it for free and I want to do it for free, but how does it fit within an economic system where exchange is only in $$$$$$ values?
Anyway I am not proud of our time of our behavior, and feel the responsibility to disrupt most of it, to awake our senses to do it differently... I choose to play again with existing images and to do it not alone but with anyone willing to draw, starting with the youngest one, because they know better!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

The Bus Station Theory, or, Why You Should Stick to Your Own Pursuit of Creativity

The Bus Station Theory, or, Why You Should Stick to Your Own Pursuit of Creativity | we ART | Scoop.it

"There are plenty of ways to think about planning an artistic career. Are you aiming to be the enfant terrible, a young provocateur? Or are you playing the long game, sticking with your work until it gets recognized? In The Guardian, Oliver Burkeman outlines a new theory of creative growth that I hadn’t heard of before — the “Helsinki Bus Station Theory.”

 

The Bus Station theory is about working with an eye to the long term rather than instant positive feedback, thinking about what will make a lasting impact and what pleases you personally. It’s a lesson we can all stand to learn. Sadly, the chaotic, convoluted New York City bus system is unlikely to teach you quite as much.

Philippe Lejeune's insight:
That's one of the most difficult thing to do, to just be yourself, more authentic I guess. There are no road for that, it's everyone responsabilty to find their own "bus". 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Liz Magic Laser Talks to the Hand | Art21

Liz Magic Laser Talks to the Hand | Art21 | we ART | Scoop.it
In this film, artist Liz Magic Laser develops \'The Digital Face\' (2012)—a new performance staged at Derek Eller Gallery in Chelsea and at MoMA PS1 in Long Island City—that examines hand gestures in contemporary presidential State of the Union...

Can you tell what politicians mean by what they say or how they move? In this film, artist Liz Magic Laser develops The Digital Face (2012)—a new performance staged at Derek Eller Gallery in Chelsea and at MoMA PS1 in Long Island City—that examines hand gestures in contemporary presidential State of the Union addresses. Struck by the virtuosity of Barack Obama’s movement in his 2012 address, Laser examined past speeches to discover that George H. W. Bush was the first president to use gestures in the televised era. The artist choreographs the presidents’ wordless movements with two Merce Cunningham-trained dancers—Cori Kresge as Obama, and Alan Good as Bush—into a performative dialogue that reveals how gestures have been embraced and codified by politicians and their handlers over the past two decades. Throughout the rehearsal process, Laser employs stop-action photography to isolate and tweak individual gestures; she later amplifies the sound of the camera shutter’s incessant clicking for the performance’s soundtrack. Tracing the origin of many of these oratorical techniques to the 19th century theoretician François Delsarte, Laser is concerned with how contemporary political figures are adopting theatrical tools to persuade the public, masking the content of their speeches with movements designed to induce empathy through well-rehearsed and often subliminal cues. “We are living in strange days,” says Laser, “where performance itself has become the dominant instrument of power.”

Philippe Lejeune's insight:

It shows that we are performing all the time, that life is a stage for every citizen, that art is embeded into our daily life expressions... Our body speaks with images and symbols. It's inspiring!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

ANYTHING CAN SUBSTITUTE ART: Maciunas in SoHo | Cooper Union

ANYTHING CAN SUBSTITUTE ART: Maciunas in SoHo | Cooper Union | we ART | Scoop.it
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

Lithuanian-born artist, architect, designer, and self-appointed "chairman" of Fluxus, George Maciunas (1931‒1978, Cooper Union School of Art graduate 1952) radically challenged the idea of avant-garde art, whether as object, concept, or commodity. Fluxus, an international community of conceptual artists, poets and composers, sought to redefine the role of the artist by substituting art for everyday tasks, experiences, actions, and sensations.


This exhibition, created in collaboration with The Jonas Mekas Visual Arts Center, Vilnius and The School of Art at The Cooper Union, NYC, focuses on rarely exhibited Fluxus works, as well as Maciunas' early works, charts, and his plans for artist housing in SoHo. Anything Can Substitute Art sheds new light on a pivotal historic period for both the city of New York and contemporary art's recent history, connecting the countercultural activism of the 1960s and 1970s to the moment of Fluxus.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Jean Dubuffet's Lasting Legacy

Jean Dubuffet's Lasting Legacy | we ART | Scoop.it
A Jean Dubuffet exhibit in the United Kingdom reveals why the art-brut-inspired artist is still extremely relevant today.

 

“In my opinion,” wrote the painter in notes for a 1960 television interview, “Each generation should dump the art of the preceding generations on the scrap heap and produce their own art, which will likewise be dumped by the following generation.”

 

But Dubuffet was not even a particular fan of his contemporaries. In 1945 he began to seek out work from beyond the art world, and soon built up a collection of work from the margins of western society, largely from asylums. He coined the term “art brut” or “raw art,” and referred to its creators as authors rather than artists. Artists, he felt at the time, were too much tainted by education and the framework of the art world.

 

“He had the right idea, his principles, as to why he was collecting Art Brut, the value of those people and their artwork. He was completely honest,” she was quick to point out. 

 

So what Dubuffet took from marginalized creators was a spirit of freedom rather than any technical tricks or ideas. The French artist worked in a prolific range of styles, all of them more or less his own. He worked with sand, earth, and tarmac on his canvases long before Neo-Expressionism. He includes comic, crude figures long before the street-derived styles of, say, Jean-Michel Basquiat or Keith Haring. And he was even doing collage with butterfly wings from 1953, long before Damien Hirst in the mid-1990s.

As a result, Dubuffet deserves to be more frequently exhibited in the UK. The current show at Pallant is timely and focussed but, despite his attitudes to the art world and the past, you wonder why this painter and thinker hasn’t yet been given a posthumous blockbuster here. After all, write Valérie Da Costa and Fabrice Hergott in their 2006 book on the artist: “Dubuffet belongs to a very small group of those few major artists, such as Duchamp, Picasso, Mondrian, and Beuys, whose works have profoundly modified our vision of art.”

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

24 beloved Street Art Photos

24 beloved Street Art Photos | we ART | Scoop.it

We declare the world as our canvas...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Networked_Performance — Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship

Networked_Performance — Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship | we ART | Scoop.it

Artificial Hells is the first historical and theoretical overview of socially engaged participatory art, known in the US as “social practice.”Claire Bishop follows the trajectory of twentieth-century art and examines key moments in the development of a participatory aesthetic. This itinerary takes in Futurism and Dada; the Situationist International; Happenings in Eastern Europe, Argentina and Paris; the 1970s Community Arts Movement; and the Artists Placement Group. It concludes with a discussion of long-term educational projects by contemporary artists such as Thomas Hirschhorn, Tania Bruguera, Paweł Althamer and Paul Chan.

Since her controversial essay in Artforum in 2006, Claire Bishop has been one of the few to challenge the political and aesthetic ambitions of participatory art. In Artificial Hells, she not only scrutinizes the emancipatory claims made for these projects, but also provides an alternative to the ethical (rather than artistic) criteria invited by such artworks. Artificial Hells calls for a less prescriptive approach to art and politics, and for more compelling, troubling and bolder forms of participatory art and criticism.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Art’s Corrosive Success: An Interview with Martha Buskirk

Art’s Corrosive Success: An Interview with Martha Buskirk | we ART | Scoop.it
Art critic Martha Buskirk on the shifts in the past few decades in the arts, particularly those relating to the interface between art and the marketplace.

 

Clement Greenberg famously talks about the avant-garde being connected to the ruling elite by an “umbilical cord of gold.” There’s always been a relationship between art and money or art and commerce, and the most interesting galleries have both been successful as businesses and had a certain kind of far-reaching aesthetic sensibility. So there’s a kind of tension or ambiguity that has been part of this picture for a long time. But what I’ve been interested in is certain kinds of extremes. And maybe that ambiguity has seemed increasingly out of balance somehow.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Philippe Lejeune from INFERNO la revue : A LA UNE
Scoop.it!

TRIBUNE : DE L’ARTISTE, DE L’ART ET DU MILIEU

TRIBUNE : DE L’ARTISTE, DE L’ART ET DU MILIEU | we ART | Scoop.it

TRIBUNE

Pour avoir un jour la chance d’accéder à un emploi pérenne et sécurisé, protégé dans le sein maternel d’un MAMCO, d’un-e MAM ou d’un-e MOMA, le Plasticien commence par passer par l’aile désaffectée d’un hôpital psychiatrique, réhabilitée en résidence d’artiste, puis finit par être diffusé(1) dans un lieu de production industrielle(2) désaffecté(3), réhabilité en centre culturel, portant nom aussi bucolique que La Métallerie, La Scierie ou La Foire aux Bestiaux.


Via Eleonor Zastavia
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

MICHEL BLAZY :CELESTIAL FOAMS ~ MOUSSES CELESTES

MICHEL BLAZY :CELESTIAL FOAMS ~ MOUSSES CELESTES | we ART | Scoop.it

 

Its ingredients? Everything that comes into his hands, objects and materials related home (food, natural or chemical). From the kitchen to the cellar, through the bathroom and garden, our home environment is scrutinized by the artist. Michel Blazy is known for its public facilities consist of nested fruit skins, and rotting mutant. We recently saw its expansive use of lasagna at a solo show (Domestic overflow) to the gallery art concept in March 2012. He is particularly interested in the composition and decomposition of the materials he directs. Within the walls of the old sacristy, it activates Final Bouquet, a bubble wall, sparkling foam, a facility for exciting the senses and mind.

I have a son who makes potions and I do the same thing: I mix, I look and I try to bring my own surprise. This is not a regression for me but rather a way to get in touch with what is beyond us by observing the object, the critters that will monopolize it. I become an observer, I do not impose things, but I look els act on the basis of intuition and I use and existing energies.

When entering the space, silence reigns and the smell of soap is present, strong, confusing. After a few minutes, we're more careful there, we quickly caught up, surprised and happily overwhelmed by the facility to which we take the time to contemplate moving the foam. Michel Blazy has indeed mounted a scaffold in front of the back wall of the old sacristy. Raw metal bars, tangled, among which he disposed of the plastic planters. The bins are filled with soap and water, two materials that will make small pipes interact. Indeed, in the pipes (similar to what we see in hospitals for transfusions) circulating air, which in contact with water and soap, as thousands of bubbles. And sparkling clusters emerge, they develop slowly from morning till night, covering up the scaffolding and eventually fall to the ground. As the backstage of a show, a play, the scaffolding will support and organize the sparkling landscape that will, over the hour, taking shape before our eyes. The work plays on the fragility of the material, its transience and its expansiveness.

French:

Ses ingrédients ? Tout ce qui lui tombe sous la main, des objets et matériaux liés la maison (alimentaires, naturels ou chimiques). De la cuisine à la cave, en passant par la salle de bain et le jardin, notre environnement familier est passé au crible de l’artiste. Michel Blazy est connu du public pour ses installations formées de peaux de fruits emboîtées, pourrissantes et mutantes. Nous avons récemment vu son utilisation expansive des lasagnes lors d’une exposition personnelle (Débordement Domestique) à la galerie art : concept en mars 2012. Il s’intéresse particulièrement à la composition et la décomposition des matériaux qu’il met en scène. Dans l’enceinte de l’ancienne sacristie, il active Bouquet Final, un mur moussant, mousseux, de mousse, une installation exaltante pour les sens et l’esprit.

J’ai un fils qui fait des potions magiques et je fais la même chose : je mélange, je regarde et je cherche à provoquer mon propre étonnement. Ce n’est pas pour moi une régression mais plutôt une façon de se mettre en relation avec ce qui nous dépasse en observant l’objet, la micro-faune qui va se l’accaparer. Je deviens un observateur, je ne m’impose pas aux choses, mais je els regarde agir sur la base de l’intuition et je me sers ainsi des énergies existantes.

Lorsqu’on pénètre dans l’espace, le silence règne et l’odeur du savon est présente, forte, déroutante. Au bout de quelques minutes, nous n’y faisons plus attention, nous sommes rapidement happés, surpris et joyeusement envahis par l’installation devant laquelle il nous prendre le temps de contempler la mousse en mouvement. Michel Blazy a en effet monté un échafaudage devant le mur du fond de l’ancienne sacristie. Des barres métalliques brutes, enchevêtrées, parmi lesquelles il a disposé des jardinières en plastique. Les bacs sont remplis de savon et d’eau, deux matériaux que des petits tuyaux vont faire interagir. En effet, dans les tuyaux (semblables à ceux que nous pouvons voir dans les hôpitaux pour les transfusions) circule de l’air, qui, au contact de l’eau et du savon, forme des milliers de bulles. Ainsi des amas mousseux voient le jour, ils se développent lentement, du matin jusqu’au soir, jusqu’à recouvrir l’échafaudage et finalement tomber sur le sol. Comme l’envers du décor d’un spectacle, d’une pièce de théâtre, l’échafaudage va soutenir et organiser le paysage mousseux qui va, au fil des heures, se dessiner devant nos yeux. L’œuvre joue sur la fragilité de la matière, son éphémérité et son caractère expansif.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Interview Daniel Buren 12:10:2010

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Why Are (Most) Artists (So Fucking) Poor?

Why Are (Most) Artists (So Fucking) Poor? | we ART | Scoop.it

On Friday evening W.A.G.E. (Working Artists and the Greater Economy) presented the results of its 2010 survey of payments received by artists who exhibited with nonprofit art institutions in New York City between 2005 and 2010. The survey found that 58% of artists who responded received “no form of payment.” The audience, including Artists Space director Stefan Kalmár, asked questions critical of the survey methodology, but did not refute the group’s findings. W.A.G.E. has partnered with Artists Space to explore the development of a self-regulatory model, mandating the implementation of a fee schedule within the institution. Presenter A.K. Burns explained one of the rationales for artists fees, “nonprofits get money from different sources for public education, and the artist is the educator. We are wondering why the artist isn’t being paid?” That artists should be remunerated for their cultural value in capital value is one of W.A.G.E.’s positions from its statement and one that remains controversial.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Europe's Biggest Contemporary Art Center Opens

Europe's Biggest Contemporary Art Center Opens | we ART | Scoop.it
PARIS — After a renovation that nearly tripled its size, the revamped Palais de Tokyo swung open its doors Thursday, inaugurating what is now the largest – and perhaps dustiest – contemporary arts center in Europe.

 

The unfinished look, so said the center's President Jean de Loisy, is deadly intentional.

"The landscape here is different from any other center in the world," de Loisy told The Associated Press. "Nothing is perfectly clean, nothing is perfectly painted on purpose. It is so important in art not to control everything. It's all in favor of creativity."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Philippe Lejeune from Participatif
Scoop.it!

Henry Jenkins on Participatory Culture (Big Thinkers Series)

University of Southern California media scholar Henry Jenkins describes how educators might fuel civic engagement by tapping the skills their students build ...

Via Omer Pesquer
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

Life is about EXPRESSION. We are all in need of expression for our well being. ART is all about the desire for someone to express something that needs to be shared. The viewer (or listener) is the receptor, that will need/want to respond, creating a dialogue. Visual Art is not well prepared for this essential form of relationship. The viewer in my sense needs to become more the doer--the doer to become the viewer... participation from the public was denied for centuries, but is now possible with new tools for communication, like the internet. Can Visual art become more participatory is the question that we should ask today, and consider answering/working on. I do.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

ArtHERE: Connecting Spaces And Art

Whiteboard animation video for ArtHERE.org, a web platform that connects spaces and art, for crowd-sourced urban revitalization.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Tea Party Condemns Children's Book 'A Rule Is to Break: A Child’s Guide to Anarchy'

Tea Party Condemns Children's Book 'A Rule Is to Break: A Child’s Guide to Anarchy' | we ART | Scoop.it
A humorous children’s book entitled 'A Rule Is to Break: A Child’s Guide to Anarchy' has come under fire from the Tea Party, which has often advocated rebellion against President Obama and Obamacare.

'A Rule is to Break,' which was released last month by publisher Manic D Press, is written and illustrated by husband-and-wife team John Seven and Jana Christy.

The book follows the character 'Wild Child' as she learns about being herself and the value of being unique, reports The Guardian.

The book's advice includes “don’t look like everybody else," "paint pictures on your T," "forget about grocery stores and get dirty in your garden," "educate yourself, use your brain" and “listen to the tiniest voice."

In its review, Publishers Weekly called the book: "The softer side of anarchy, with an emphasis on fun and independence, but also community and kindness."
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

Being an artist is endorsing the idea that there are no rules but the ones we create for ourselves. Being free to be creative & self expressive is the desire to not follow any outside rules...to follow our own intuition. We can't live without rules or by following other's rules. The balance is to do it within the respect of other peoples values, which doesn't means we can't provoke, challenge every point of view. Art helps to question everything... including ourselves!

 

Trying to break "rules" in Art is actually a very challenging proposition, you realize we are constantly following ... why making an image on a flat surface? why within a rectangle? why to make it permanent? why to frame it? etc... it's endless. More you question what you are doing more you are willing to experiment and try to work differently. It's actually refreshing and it helps you to be more intuitive or personal (original) in your actions, you end up growing up. Children knows to do all this naturally, it's only when we tell them to follow "rules" that we start hurting them... The Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle once said: "All people desire to have more understanding. The first condition is to know how to achieve a view of life through the eyes of children, to see what is new and what makes you wonder." The great writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, author of The Little Prince, has also written: "In every child a Mozart is asleep."
"Rules" are necessary, it's also necessary to know how/when to brake them. Do we teach those rules to our Children, enough?

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY - Official Trailer

Named by ArtReview as the most powerful artist in the world, Ai Weiwei is China's most celebrated contemporary artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic...

 

"He is expressing: I love the Culture, but I want something new!" The question is what's wrong with the values our Culture express today. It's everyone responsability to re-define the way we approach, use & share our Culture...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Summer camps: artistic utopia of Black Mountain College

Summer camps: artistic utopia of Black Mountain College | we ART | Scoop.it

John Cage, Rauschenberg, Merce Cunningham: they all participated in the artistic utopia of Black Mountain College, established in 1933. Histoire (s).

John Cage, Rauschenberg, Merce Cunningham : ils ont tous participé à l’utopie artistique du Black Mountain College, créé en 1933. Histoire(s).

Google translation:

Summer 1952. In the refectory of the Black Mountain College, John Cage orchestra before time - the word does appear officially in 1958 in the journal Anthologist - the first happening in the history of art. Arrived four years earlier with his sidekick choreographer Merce Cunningham, Cage had begun replaying "Le Piège de Méduse" Erik Satie, a comedy in one act opera acted by Buckminster Fuller and De Kooning. No Title of the Event 1952, later renamed "Theater Piece No.1", the same active lever action. Again, each participant is asked to play its part in the middle of assistance arranged as a star.

 

Eté 1952. Dans le réfectoire du Black Mountain College, John Cage orchestre avant l’heure – le mot n’apparaîtra officiellement qu’en 1958 dans la revue Anthologist – le premier happening de l’histoire de l’art. Débarqué quatre ans plus tôt avec son acolyte le chorégraphe Merce Cunningham, Cage avait entrepris de rejouer Le Piège de Méduse d’Erik Satie, une comédie lyrique en un acte qu’il fait jouer par Buckminster Fuller et De Kooning. Le Non Title Event de 1952, rebaptisé plus tard Theater Piece No.1, active le même levier collectif. Là encore, chaque participant est invité à jouer sa partition au milieu d’une assistance disposée en étoile.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Making Boston A Hub For Contemporary Art

Making Boston A Hub For Contemporary Art | we ART | Scoop.it

Helen Molesworth, the curator of Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art, is passionate about art. And she’s willing and able to articulate her passion in a way that is understandable and accessible on the one hand, and deep and thoughtful on the other. The Boston Globe has described her as “one of the greatest curators of our time.”

 

“Interactivity is kind of a buzzword right now in contemporary art and I think the interactivity happens both at the level of technology, people touching screens so realizing that their body is activating some kind of sounds or light; but there is also a demand for interactivity in term of performance, having the performer being in the gallery to answer questions or to stage little place or dancing in the gallery, all of which those type of thing happen at the ICA. But there is a sense that people want a kind of physical emotional social connection with other people and that is what the Museum... the Museum is not a virtual place, it’s a very real place and I think people crave that kind of interactivity.”

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Forgetting the Art World - The MIT Press

Forgetting the Art World - The MIT Press | we ART | Scoop.it

It may be time to forget the art world--or at least to recognize that a certain historical notion of the art world is in eclipse. Today, the art world spins on its axis so quickly that its maps can no longer be read; its borders blur. In Forgetting the Art World, Pamela Lee connects the current state of this world to globalization and its attendant controversies. Contemporary art has responded to globalization with images of movement and migration, borders and multitudes, but Lee looks beyond iconography to view globalization as a world process. Rather than think about the “global art world” as a socioeconomic phenomenon, or in terms of the imagery it stages and sponsors, Lee considers “the work of art’s world” as a medium through which globalization takes place. She argues that the work of art is itself both object and agent of globalization.

Lee explores the ways that art actualizes, iterates, or enables the processes of globalization, offering close readings of works by artists who have come to prominence in the last two decades. She examines the “just in time” managerial ethos of Takahashi Murakami; the production of ethereal spaces in Andreas Gursky’s images of contemporary markets and manufacture; the logic of immanent cause dramatized in Thomas Hirschhorn’s mixed-media displays; and the “pseudo-collectivism” in the contemporary practice of the Atlas Group, the Raqs Media Collective, and others.

To speak of “the work of art’s world,” Lee says, is to point to both the work of art’s mattering and its materialization, to understand the activity performed by the object as utterly continuous with the world it at once inhabits and creates.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

What Is and Isn't Art in Saudi Arabia?

What Is and Isn't Art in Saudi Arabia? | we ART | Scoop.it
The host of a series of monthly Casual Art Talks surveys the contemporary art scene in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Philippe Lejeune from INFERNO la revue : A LA UNE
Scoop.it!

UN ENTRETIEN AVEC ALAIN BADIOU : THEATRE ET PHILOSOPHIE, UN VIEUX COUPLE ANTAGONISTE ET COMPLICE

UN ENTRETIEN AVEC ALAIN BADIOU :  THEATRE ET PHILOSOPHIE, UN VIEUX COUPLE ANTAGONISTE ET COMPLICE | we ART | Scoop.it

IDEES : Un entretien avec Alain Badiou autour du rapport qu’entretiennent la philosophie et le théâtre Nous publions cet entretien avec Alain Badiou, réalisé cette semaine à Avignon.

 

Il y a trois tendances différentes, une tendance qui dirait que l’illusion est notre véritable être au monde, que le monde lui-même est illusion, et qu’il est donc absurde de dire : ne soyons pas dans l’illusion, de toute façon l’illusion est notre loi. Un autre courant dira que c’est la représentation qui est constitutive de notre représentation, c’est ce que fait Kant. Chez Kant la configuration du monde par la représentation est constitutive de notre expérience, il y a pas de sens à dire qu’il faille en sortir. Il y a des courants qui assument l’illusion comme une donnée majeure de l’expérience, mais il peux y avoir un courant dialectique qui dit que l’illusion ou la représentation est d’autant plus nécessaire qu’elle est une médiation, un moment, un temps dialectique de la connaissance elle-même, je pense ici à la thèse Hégélienne.


Via Eleonor Zastavia
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

How the Art Market Thrives on Inequality

How the Art Market Thrives on Inequality | we ART | Scoop.it

Buying fine art is a bet that the rich are going to get richer.

 

The art market, in other words, is a proxy for the fate of the superrich themselves. Investors who believe that incomes and wealth will return to a more equitable state should ignore art and put their money into investments that grow alongside the overall economy, like telecoms and steel. For those who believe that the very, very rich will continue to grow at a pace that outstrips the rest of us, it seems like there’s no better investment than art.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe Lejeune
Scoop.it!

Marina Abramovic's New Art Center

Marina Abramovic's New Art Center | we ART | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — Performance artist Marina Abramovic plans to build a $15 million center in upstate New York devoted to the research and production of duration-based works of art lasting from six hours to several days.

 

Abramovic also wants to use the center to teach her Abramovic Method, in which the viewer becomes the artist and vice versa.

"For the young artists we will have courses which will be in the countryside, without food, in complete isolation, not talking for a certain amount because it's really important preparation of the mind to do performance work," she said.

Serge Le Borgne, a Paris gallerist and curator, will serve as director of the institute.

"I'm not going to run the center," said Abramovic. "I'm going to create a concept and also make some courses myself. But I really want to create a legacy that can run without me."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Philippe Lejeune from Social Art Practices
Scoop.it!

Practically Social, Practically Practice | The Milk Wax

Practically Social, Practically Practice | The Milk Wax | we ART | Scoop.it

Social practice can probably be defined as the meeting between ethics, aesthetics and exchange. Think: murals with QR codes or turning the Chicago skyline into a musical score. The role (and responsibility) of the artist to the environment and the society within which he exists is probably at the center of the field. My ego is probably too big to take it up, but social practice should be comprised of public works, engagement with the community, performance, and documentation. It should involve art that speaks to the ways in which we interact, undermining (or re-enforcing) our process of exchange–of information, emotion, money, time, culture. I’m instantly worried, though, that it could become mired in its own capacity for documentation–like a behavioral psychologist doing endless field research. What form does it take?It will be interesting to see what Kristaps Gulbis and the students in The University of New Mexico’s burgeoning International Social Practices program develop during his residency in Albuquerque. The program–a partnership between UNM and UC Santa Cruz–is bound to deepen the relevance of the art department at UNM, if only by bringing it in step with what might be the fastest-growing field in arts education. The most popular (if I can use that word) social practice program surely is the one developed by Harrell Fletcher at Portland State University–you only need look at the upcoming Open Engagement: Art and Social Practice conference to see how large it has become.

My main thing, though, is I want to see how social practice performs; what it looks like beyond a pedagogical structure.


Via Jules Rochielle
more...
No comment yet.