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Border Walls

Border Walls | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


Via Seth Dixon
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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 4:49 PM
I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.

WBHS Human Geography
This page provides links to articles, videos, etc. I've found on the web that relate to topics we are studying in Human Geography.
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When A Language Dies, What Happens To Culture?

When A Language Dies, What Happens To Culture? | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nearly half of the 7,000 languages spoken in the world are expected to vanish in the next 100 years.
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Silicon Valley Trailer Park Residents Fight To Stay

Silicon Valley Trailer Park Residents Fight To Stay | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Facing the loss of their homes, low-income residents seek to hold on to educational opportunities.
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Ethnic Divisions In Russia Grow Sharper

Ethnic Divisions In Russia Grow Sharper | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Police have been rounding up hundreds of migrant workers after an ethnic riot in Moscow.
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BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | Dark side of the Dubai dream

BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | Dark side of the Dubai dream | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Behind the glitz and glamour of Dubai often lies a murky world of exploitation and an immigrant work force living on the breadline.
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The high-earning butlers of Dubai

The high-earning butlers of Dubai | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Britain, butlers may seem like a relic of another era, but in some other countries, particularly emerging economies, they are in huge demand.
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An interesting spin on the concept of guest workers!

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

Via Seth Dixon, Jason Rowe
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 2015 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


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Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 12:49 PM

I saw the pictures. It is amazing how peoples back yards are all different. From water to dirt to garbage to no back yards at all. I was commenting on the fact with the population growth there is only one way to build and that is up. Then i saw the pictures of the High risers and how tall they were and so close together. It is a no wonder people live in a stressful environment. There is nothing like living in a wide open land lot with grass in Wyoming or Montana but that sure will change in the next 50 years.

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APHUG Films Presents...

Promotional video for AP Human Geography enrollment

Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 17, 2013 4:30 PM

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  Similar videos and things designed to promote the discipline and it's study can be found under the tag, "geo-inspiration." 


Tags: APHG, geo-inspiration.

Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:16 PM

La geografía tiene que ver con todo.

Con ella entendemos el desarrollo humano.

Echa un vistazo.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:37 PM

I need to show this Day 1 of next school year

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geteach.com

geteach.com | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Free site dedicated to help teachers educate and engage students using Google Earth

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 2013 2:54 PM

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed by an AP teacher to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.  Click here for a video tutorial.


Tags:  google, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.


Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:54 AM

Use Google Earth in the classroom with clickable layering of maps.  Great for bringing Geography into your classroom!

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 2015 5:18 AM

GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.

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Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Aerial photo tour across countries and continents with a French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand"


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The Crew's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:12 AM

I think that urban farming goes to show how people adapt to their environment regarding agricultural practices. People are breaking the bondage of the stereotypical idea that you can"t farm in the city. However, in this article, we see that citizens are conforming to their environment to make the best agricultural use of land. -Scout

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:10 PM

In a time where more people are moving away from their rural roots to try and make it big in the city, I think it's becoming more and more important that we focus on how to utilize our urban surroundings in a beneficial way. These photos are proof that it is possible, and I believe that cities in the United States should be more open to urban farming. It could be a way to not only take pressure off of families in cities trying to feed their children, but will also educate all sorts of people on where food comes from, and the importance of the environment. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:16 PM

Urban agriculture is a reality in third world countries. In Dominican Republic almost everyone in the country side have its own land to plant necessary food and fruits. The most popular is plantain and fruit is orange.

In urban areas is rare to see this, so is surprising to see how central Asians are doing it.

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Spatial Analysis of LBJ

Spatial Analysis of LBJ | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
LeBron explains how he transformed himself into a ruthlessly efficient scoring machine.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 29, 2013 10:22 AM

This series of spatial diagrams (dare I say, maps?) shows how the offense game of LeBron James has changed dramatically over the last few years, greatly increasing his efficiency.  Do you know of a basketball-loving student that might appreciate spatial analysis more when seen through the lens of their favorite sport? 


Tag: sportspatial.

Trisha Klancar's curator insight, March 30, 2013 9:36 AM

Okkk. This is really fun to watch... why not map it out!!

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:26 PM

i never even heard of the Golan Heights before this and i would have never known the significance of this DMZ until now. this just sheds more light on what is happening in syria today.

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Before Church Songbooks There Was 'Lined-Out' Singing

Before Church Songbooks There Was 'Lined-Out' Singing | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
The song leader calls out a line and the people respond in a mournful, soaring chorus.
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One Roof, Many Generations: Redefining The Single-Family Home

One Roof, Many Generations: Redefining The Single-Family Home | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
A post-recession demand for bigger houses is partly due to boomerang kids and aging parents.
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Harvest Brings Farm Families Together, Redefines Commitment

Harvest Brings Farm Families Together, Redefines Commitment | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
For farm families in Nebraska, it's all hands on deck to bring in the corn harvest.
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.
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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


Via Seth Dixon, Jason Rowe
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

Via Seth Dixon, Jason Rowe
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 2015 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

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Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller (kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us) adapted from Don Ziegler.


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:53 PM

This was a nice powerpoint that gave a concise and to the point depiction of the central place theory. It had some good examples and pictures that allowed me to really visualize and go over the theory without confusion.

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:04 PM

Central Place Theory - This PowerPoint is the best representation of Christaller's Central Place Theory that I've seen! It does a great job at showing its hexagonal layout, along with describing urban hierarchy and sizes, and range that a person will go to buy certain goods.

Cohen Adkins's curator insight, February 6, 3:43 PM

I believe the central place theory is very important for Business owners who want to set up a commercial building because it shows the amount of competition that the business owner would have if they desire to settle somewhere. - C.Adkins

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 2015 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:54 AM

This video lays out them main difference between educational theory in the west, and educational theory in the east. In the west, we place value on a student achieving the right answer. Right Answers eventually lead to high grades. All classes eventually boil down to the grade given. In reality, it is all that most parents, teachers and students care about. In the east knowledge is measured through the work that goes in to getting the correct answer. Mistakes are seen as a natural outcome of hard work. They are not discouraged as they are in western education.

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 10:57 PM

It's interesting to see the differences between learning here, and in Eastern cultures. There is more of an acceptance of struggling in school there, and more encouragement to keep trying to get things right, rather than just being told that you are wrong.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 15, 2015 2:16 PM

the difference in mentality is amazing as described in this article the difference in perception of struggling students in america and Asian countries is staggering and i think that our country has been so concerned for so long with only the best succeeding that it needs to be fixed, i know that we have taken steps int he right direction with different government programs which is promising and hopefully this development will continue

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The Geography of Afghanistan

The Geography of Afghanistan | WBHS Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Students are introduced to the physical and human features of Afghanistan."


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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:04 PM

Afghanistan is a unique country that is plagued by the media as war torn and savage. Not much about Afghanistan cultural geography and how ordinary Afghan people function is represented by mainstream news organizations and other forms of western media. Its a shame. 

Afghanistan is a mountainous country thus creating four distinct regions that have more or less there own identity. This has been seen throughout history. Geography can keep a nation separated culturally and tougher to govern on a political scale as well. This is especially present in lesser develop nations. For example Ancient Greece was tough to keep politically sound due to its nonstop Mountains. This makes communication difficult, especially in a timely fashion. It also keeps people separate from each other leading people to create there own culture. Italy is another example in regards to the Industrial North being an extreme opposite of the agricultural south. The Northern Italian geography was heavily influenced by other European industrial nations while the agrarian south remained simple. These two separate identities have been present for some time and have continued to produce conflict since the forming of the Country Italy in the late 19th century. None the less, Afghanistan is another example of geography separating a country. However the geography also gives birth to different styles of living.

People in rural Afghanistan still practice pastoralism. The movement of livestock by changing of seasons is complemented by farmers growing of crops such as barley, nuts, wheat, and fruit, just to name a few. These people mostly live off of what they produce. Within the past decade Afghanistan has undergone a process of urbanization. I argue its due to westernization of the potential/growth of a Central Business District. The respected main cities in the four different regions, especially Kabul have seen a huge population growth. This is due to cities offering education and economic mobility. The standard of living is higher and attracts people from rural areas. I can imagine it is attracting relatively young people ranging from 15 to 30 years of age whom are seeking a different way of life.

The cities rely on the rural regions for certain supplies of food and the rural regions rely of manufactured goods. Its nice to see Afghanistan pastoralists not  being luddites and excepting technology as a positive force.

My perception on Afghanistan is that its a first world country. However it is starting to form the foundation for lifting itself from first world to second world. Afghanistan has a new government (western influenced), which is essential in developing a nation. However there are signs of corruption. If able to establish a more sound country, it can begin to build its economy from within and spread outward. With becoming more politically and economically developed Afghanistan would become a second world nation. Afghanistan has a lot to go through before it can be considered second world. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 4, 2015 11:27 PM

Once I opened this portal I was amazed with how many resources were available, having worksheets, maps, lesson plans and videos really can help a teacher to get more in depth while teaching about Afghanistan. Having the opportunity to let the children watch video's can really help the visual learners in the classroom and well s the auditory learners. The lesson plan talks about the history and people in Afghanistan as well as maps that help trace out ethnicities in the region.The video on daily life would really help show the children how different their lives are from those in Afghanistan, to create an assignment from the video the children could do a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the lives of the average United States citizen and the daily life of someone living in Afghanistan.

Every area in the world has a different geography  and I believe it is important for everyone whether it be students or adults, everyone should learn about each region to get an understanding of how other people are living in the world around us.

As a history, social studies or geography teacher I would come back to this lesson plan and enlighten my children using the Common Core Standards so when they venture out in the world they have a grasp of what is going on around them.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:52 PM

From this, I learned that the borders are shaped for Russia and British India to have uncommon borders. Having friendly ties with Pakistan has a lot to do with the Soviet presence with in Central Asia. It is predominantly agrigul society. 20% live in urban areas and 80% live in rural areas. Urban spaces tend to be more modernized with water and electricity.  Those in the rural areas have had no running water and have been living their lives without and in a way in which we would not be used to. People in rural areas cook on open fire, life for women is very labor intensive, so it is good for big families because then the children can help, both in and out the house. 

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Seth Dixon
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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world.