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The Hidden Water We Use - National Geographic

The Hidden Water We Use - National Geographic | waterresources | Scoop.it
Figure out your water footprint one product at a time.

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Water Information Infographics | First Worlds Water

Water Information Infographics | First Worlds Water | waterresources | Scoop.it
This great information on water infographic for plumbing giving you the facts and great support on everything you require when it comes to water, first worlds water.
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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | waterresources | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 6:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 12:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

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How Does Lack of Water Affect Women and Children?

How Does Lack of Water Affect Women and Children? | waterresources | Scoop.it
In the developing world, the daily task of finding clean water disproportionally affects the community's most vulnerable: women and children.

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Water Will Be the Critical Limiting Factor of 21st Century Production

Water Will Be the Critical Limiting Factor of 21st Century Production | waterresources | Scoop.it
Morgan Stanley’s Global Investment Committee recently released a report in which it argues that the “perfect storm” of declining water supply and...

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Water Footprint of an American | The Nature Conservancy

Water Footprint of an American | The Nature Conservancy | waterresources | Scoop.it

The “water footprint” of the average American is 32,911 glasses per day. That’s according to a recent study by a Conservancy partner organization, the Water Footprint Network.

No wonder another recent report co-authored by Conservancy scientist Brian Richter has found that water scarcity affects about 2.7 billion people for at least one month each year.

Where is all this water? It’s used to produce the food we eat, clothes we wear and more. And where does it come from? Nature. In fact, about 70 percent of the water extracted from rivers, lakes and aquifers is for agriculture.


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Water Infographics

Water Infographics | waterresources | Scoop.it
Water is one of the most basic needs, and a good portion of our planet is already experiencing a major shortage of water that is safe to drink.

Here are some well-illustrated infographics about H2O. Our first two infographics of the day come from GOOD, who partnered with Levis last year and rolled out a whole line of water-themed infographics. The first appeals to the humanitarian in you, while the second appeals to your checkbook. Save water, save lives and money...


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Mapping Global Water Stress

Mapping Global Water Stress | waterresources | Scoop.it

Water scarcity is likely to be one of the great problems facing the planet this century. Various risk factors contribute to the scarcity of clean water. A new mapping tool from the World Resources Institute visualizes how those risk factors can combine to create large problems, or how conditions can be improved to reduce the potential for water shortages between now and 2095.

The Water Risk Atlas shows how variable environmental conditions, human activities and regulatory environments affect the stability of water sources all over the world. One-year and three-year socioeconomic droughts can be displayed, as can baseline water stress, seasonal variability, inter-annual variability, and flood frequency. The tool also shows projected water stress levels for the years 2025, 2050 and 2095, under three different climate change scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.


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Always thought that Tap Water was clean? Think again (Infographic)

Always thought that Tap Water was clean? Think again (Infographic) | waterresources | Scoop.it

Did you know that tap water can contain pesticides, herbicides, bacterias, micro-organisms, organic materials and radio-nuclicides which can cause water-related illness?

Learn how you can reduce the risk of disease by up to 33% with effective water filtration...


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Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand

Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand | waterresources | Scoop.it

The hydrological water year starts every autumn on 1 October and extends to the following 30 September. The available description from the USGS does not explain why this is the period considered, but there is some natural logic to the hydrological year: with the end of summer comes the (approximate) end of intense evaporation from reservoirs and the beginning of the seasons in which the net water balance in a watershed is generally positive. That is, in general, precipitation > evaporation.

Normally, from the beginning through about two-thirds of the water year, water is stored in the higher reaches of large watersheds as snowpack, which melts and runs off through the rest of the water year. Stream flows generally continue to drop from October through winter, but then rise significantly at the start of the melt season. That imbalance applies over a period longer than a single storm and for the whole watershed, not just on a random wet or dry day in one's own neighborhood.

 

One of the more interesting areas to observe the water year is the Colorado River Basin (CRB) in the southwestern US. The Colorado River has become so strictly regulated, in part because of gross over-allocation, over nearly a century of intensive use that it has become what I think is a consummate example of the coupled natural - human system...

 

Visit the link for a closer look at this detailed map of the CRB natural and engineered systems designed for National Geographic. Also, obtain more information regarding statistics on CRB flows and the status of reservoirs and other river operations, including links to various organizations and resources for further study...


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Flooding: Too much of a basic human need

Flooding: Too much of a basic human need | waterresources | Scoop.it
Water is essential to life but in such places as India, Pakistan, China, and Thailand deluges have once again caused misery. Typhoon Nesat hit the Philippines earlier this week on its way to south China.

 

I've linked to the Boston Globe's "The Big Picture before...it consistently is one of the best sources for geographic images around the world.  This particular photo essay focuses on water-related natural disasters, and seeing the damaging is a poignant moment to get students to reflect on the human and environmental interactions, how we build and where we build. 


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Irene's Punishing Rains Seen in 3-D

Irene's Punishing Rains Seen in 3-D | waterresources | Scoop.it

Very cool visualizations...always nice to catch the student's eyes. 


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Treated Wastewater Used for Drinking

Treated Wastewater Used for Drinking | waterresources | Scoop.it
As water becomes more precious, suppliers are beginning to overcome public aversion to treating and reusing wastewater.

 

Water might be the most important natural resource for sustaining life.


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Infographic: Charting the History of Agriculture & Climate Change

Infographic: Charting the History of Agriculture & Climate Change | waterresources | Scoop.it

A new infographic that maps the progress of the agricultural sector in addressing climate change throughout the history of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations has been launched on the sidelines of this year’s climate summit in Doha.


“Agriculture is already being hard hit by climate change and the outlook is even worse. However there are options for adaptation, and some of these even bring mitigation co-benefits,” said Bruce Campbell, Director of the Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security research program.
Agriculture supports over 1 million of the world’s rural poor, yet is responsible for 80% of overall deforestation and 31% of total greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural yields and improving farming techniques are some the ways that could help reduce its overall contribution to climate change.
In addition to tracking the developments and effects climate change has had on global farming communities, the infographic also calls for the creation of a Work Program on Agriculture under the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technology Advice (SBSTA) – a scientific advisory group to the UNFCCC. A new work program could document and share knowledge of improved practices to inform decision-making on agriculture and climate change to the UNFCCC’s Conference of the Parties.


The infographic was created by Farming First, a coalition of farmers associations, engineers and scientists, in partnership with the CGIAR Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security research program (CCAFS) and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT).


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Infographic: The Global Water Crisis

Infographic: The Global Water Crisis | waterresources | Scoop.it
Despite the critical role that water has in our everyday lives, few people realize that the world’s freshwater supply is facing a major crisis in the near future.

Take a look at this infographic for more details, statistics and data on the 'invisible threat to humanity's future' to help increase awareness with regard to the global water crisis...


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Infographic: Lack of Clean Water Access Worldwide - Health - GOOD

Infographic: Lack of Clean Water Access Worldwide - Health - GOOD | waterresources | Scoop.it
Across the world, people are dying from lack of access to potable water.

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Water, water everywhere?

Water, water everywhere? | waterresources | Scoop.it

Ben Franklin warned us. You won’t miss the water ‘til the well runs dry. That’s a cautionary metaphor, but it’s also literally true. In the developed world we take our water for granted. We pour drinking water on our lawns, the largest irrigated crop in America. We spray drinking water to clean sidewalks and wash cars. And that’s just the water we can see.


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Water Facts & Children: Infographic

Water Facts & Children: Infographic | waterresources | Scoop.it

Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related disease. In the developing world, 24,000 children under the age of five die every day from preventable causes like diarrhea contracted from unclean water.


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Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style

Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style | waterresources | Scoop.it

Levi's has created a line of jeans which requires significantly less water to make.

As the first apparel company to require manufacturers to protect water quality and restrict the use of harmful chemicals, Levi's has helped ensure that water leaving its factories is cleaner than the water that comes in.

Continuing with their commitment to water consciousness, Levi's has created Water<less jeans, which requires significantly less water during the manufacturing process. Click on the infographic to learn more about how the company did it...


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TakePart Infographic: Not A Drop to Drink

TakePart Infographic: Not A Drop to Drink | waterresources | Scoop.it

You’ve heard there’s a water crisis. But, what does that mean? When water flows in seemingly limitless quantities out of the tap and gets trucked to cities in bottles by the ton, it doesn’t seem like water is something we’re in danger of losing.

 

Water quantity and quality should be a top issue for Americans. In this infographic created with TakePart are the four major components of the issue, and how they’re all connected.


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Food and Water infographics | Center for Investigative Reporting

Food and Water infographics | Center for Investigative Reporting | waterresources | Scoop.it

There's something about a searing hot summer day that leads a guy to kick off his shoes, turn on his fan and head to the Internet in search of cool graphics about the importance of water in the global food system.

Thanks to the Water Footprint Network, where we found several of these...


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Virtual Water: Motion Graphics

Virtual Water: Motion Graphics | waterresources | Scoop.it

Most of the water we use - 92 % of it - is used in food production. Most of this water is managed by the world’s farmers. With the help of science and technology they have performed greater and greater miracles in improving water productivity – in getting more crops per drop.

The good news is that each one of us can also make the world a little more water secure, ready to face the needs of our peak population future.

The answer lies in our shopping baskets...


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What Will Be Left Then?

What Will Be Left Then? | waterresources | Scoop.it

A fun thought exercise touching on the themes of energy, resources, consumption and sustainability.  We all know that we are consuming resources quickly; if we (globally) continue at the same rate of consumption, how long with certain resources last?  If a is child born now, what resources would be gone when s/he is a middle aged?  A senior citizen? See the animated version here: http://www.amanda-warner.com/samples/whatleft/  


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Interactive Infographic: How Does Lack of Water Affect Women and Children?

Interactive Infographic: How Does Lack of Water Affect Women and Children? | waterresources | Scoop.it
A GOOD Transparency....

 

This simple graphic shows the uneven effects of development based on demographic factors such as gender and age.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 3, 2011 4:52 PM
My first question is, why does it have to be the female who has to find clean water for her children. Most of us have seen the challenges and how horrific it is to get clean water in some poor countries, these poor women everyday have to nurture their children (which isn't always just one or two) provide for the family and on top of it all search for water. I just think in these types of countries where women face so much complexity in surviving, but also their children because, as soon as their children can walk they are usually also set out to fight for themselves.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 3, 2011 5:30 PM
Good question, because there is nothing biological that makes women the "right choice" to get the water, but it is a cultural bias that is ingrained within so many societies. The cultural notion of "woman's work" is most certainly different from place to place.
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Human/Environmental Interactions

The collapse of the Aral Sea ecosystem is (arguably) the man-made environmental disaster of the 20th century.  Soviet mismanagement, water-intensive cotton production and population growth have all contributed the overtaxing of water resources in the Aral Sea basin, which has resulted in a the shrinking of the Aral Sea--it has lost more of the sea to an expanding desert than the territories of the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg combined.  The health problems arising from this issues are large for the entire Aral Sea basin, which encompasses 5 Central Asian countries and it has profoundly changed (for the worse) the local climates. 


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 17, 2013 5:49 PM

I've read about the disaster of the Aral Sea before when I was taking a class on Eurasian history, but being able to visualize it made it even more striking. It was especially striking when, at the end, the man was talking about the great paradox he sees between people who are being threatened with rising ocean levels and then his people who are threatened by the drying of the Aral. It really does show how humans impact the environment, and demonstrates that areas in which people are manual laborers, working resources, health and environmental conditions tend to be worse. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:11 AM

This has to be one of the most telling video of an environmental disaster I have even seen.  A whole sea, 26,000 square miles, bigger than the state of West Virginia, is bascially gone due to Soviet mismanagement.  This is an environmental disaster now that the Russians do not have to deal with as it is now located in the independant country of Kazakhstan.  It effects them as well as the new countries that have come to be withthe collapse of the USSR.  Seems Russian dodged this just like Chernobyl.  This is something we need to lean from, on how not to use a natural resource until it literally has dried up.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 9:24 AM

The Aral Sea, located in Central Asia is a very important water source for the entire region.  Unfortunately, the Soviet Union designated this water sources as one which would provide water to rice and cotton crops, which are both very water-intensive crops.  This has resulted in desertification of the area due to the cyclical shrinking volume of the lake.  Sands and chemicals are now free to blow around, affecting people's health.  This is one of the best examples on earth of environmental exploitation due to a lack of environmental planning.  When the lake dries up, the inhabitants of the surrounding countries will be in huge trouble.