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Earth Day: Artist Willie Cole recycles water bottles into chandeliers for ... - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com

Earth Day: Artist Willie Cole recycles water bottles into chandeliers for ... - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Earth Day: Artist Willie Cole recycles water bottles into chandeliers for ...

In the Earth Day-related exhibit, water bottles are at once symbols of Cole's environmentalism, his belief in the oneness of all that exists, and his success at supporting himself with his art.

Joined by lengths of sturdy wire, the array of empty bottles represents the connection of thousands of individuals. "When the water flows out of the bottle the person's breath flows into the bottle," Cole says. "That breath, to me, represents the spirit."

"The multiplication of single objects is a study in oneness," he explains. "Even though we appear to be separate and different. there's only one life force and it's in all of us, so we are all connected."

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Global action urged to save oceans from pollution, acidification - Business Recorder (blog)

Global action urged to save oceans from pollution, acidification - Business Recorder (blog) | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Business Recorder (blog) Global action urged to save oceans from pollution, acidification Business Recorder (blog) image UNITED NATIONS: Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon Thursday called on world leaders to take stronger action to protect the planet's...

"We need practical, timely action at the national, regional and global levels to improve the health of the oceans, and to recover and sustain ocean resources," he told "The High Seas, Our Future! Conference" in a message read out in Paris by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Director-General Irina Bokova. 

"It is time to take stronger, more pragmatic and more concerted effort to protect our oceans," he said, stressing that oceans were heating up and their acidification was adversely affecting on marine life, while rising sea levels threatened to re-draw the global map at the expense of hundreds of millions of people, often the most vulnerable.

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Rising Seas Swallow 8 Cities in These Climate Change GIFs ("power of pictures")

Rising Seas Swallow 8 Cities in These Climate Change GIFs ("power of pictures") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Climate change and global warming may cause sea levels to rise and flood coastal cities across the world. Over the past century, the Global Mean Sea Level has risen by 4 to 8 in...

How will the world look if that happens? In November of 2012, The New York Times published interactive maps displaying the effects of the sea level rising, in a series titled "What Could Disappear?" The maps show how much land the sea will claim in the future, if it rises by 5, 12, and 25 feet.

Nickolay Lamm, a 24-year-old researcher and artist saw the interactive maps and wondered: "What would this actually look like in real life?" Lamm told Mashable in an email interview that "the only imagery I had of sea level rise came from Hollywood." So he decided to put his skills to work.

"I felt that if I could bring these maps to life, it would force people to look at sea level rise in a new way," he said.

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Microbes Buried Deep in Ocean Crust May Form World’s Largest Ecosystem

Microbes Buried Deep in Ocean Crust May Form World’s Largest Ecosystem | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Far below the ocean floor, scientists have discovered a microbial community away from undersea vents, beyond the reach of the sun (RT @mocost: Microbes Buried Deep in Ocean Crust May Form World’s Largest Ecosystem

If you were to hit the seafloor and continue to travel down, you’d run into an ecosystem unlike any other on earth. Beneath several hundred meters of seafloor sediment is the Earth’s crust: thick layers of lava rock running with cracks that cover around 70% of the planet’s surface. Seawater flows through the cracks, and this system of rock-bound rivulets is enormous: it’s the largest aquifer on earth, containing 4% of global ocean volume, says Mark Lever, an ecologist who studies anaerobic (no-oxygen) carbon cycling at Aarhus University in Denmark.

The sub-seafloor crust may also be the largest ecosystem on earth, according to a new study by Lever, published this month in Science. For seven years, he incubated 3.5 million-year old basalt rock collected from 565 meters below the ocean floor–the depth of nearly two stacked Eiffel towers–and found living microbes. These microbes live far away from the thriving bacterial communities at mid-ocean ridges, and survive by slowly churning sulfur and other minerals into energy.

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In Asia, tide slowly turning against shark fin soup

In Asia, tide slowly turning against shark fin soup | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Will lovers of the deluxe Chinese dish eat shark species into extinction?

But the anti-finning camp is buoyed by a slew of major victories. Basketball star Yao Ming, celebrity royalty in China, has publicly urged China’s government to ban shark fin consumption. Last year, China’s Communist Party vowed to phase out shark fin soup from official functions. Taiwan, the fourth-largest shark fin market, has legally forbidden fishermen from sawing off shark fins and dumping the carcass overboard. The same rule applies to boatmen in EuropeanUnion waters.

The latest research into endangered shark populations, recently published in the journal Marine Policy, contends that a whopping 100 million, and perhaps up to 273 million, are killed each year. At this clip, several sought-after species — the scalloped hammerhead, the porbeagle and the oceanic whitetip — may not be able to reproduce fast enough to stave off extinction.

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Changing ecosystem concerns fishermen | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Changing ecosystem concerns fishermen | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
They're not alone: As Gulf of Maine waters become warmer and more acidic, scientists too worry about the implications for the region's fisheries. (Sea temps rise in Gulf of Maine.
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Toilet-to-tap: recycled water gets the hard sell ("cheaper than desalination")

Toilet-to-tap: recycled water gets the hard sell ("cheaper than desalination") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Australians will be encouraged to embrace highly treated sewage for drinking in the strongest push so far to overcome the "yuck factor" and push the contentious option onto the national agenda.
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Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour - The Province

Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour - The Province | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
BBC News
Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour
The Province
Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour. The Province February 18, 2013 1:46 PM.
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Finally. Research shows beer healthier than water - Hot Air

Finally. Research shows beer healthier than water - Hot Air | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Finally. Research shows beer healthier than water
Hot Air
KANSAS CITY, Missouri – Forget water or Gatorade. The drink of choice to rehydrate after a workout is beer.

Not only did the beer rehydrate the test subjects better, but the alcohol apparently served as a minor pain reliever for the aches and stresses of working out. Of course, even the eggheads running this promising study failed to see the forest for the trees, missing the one obvious solution to the entire conundrum. If you just didn’t work out in the first place and stayed on the couch drinking beer, you would require neither hydration or pain relief. But we’ll clearly have to be patient and bring these people around one step at a time.

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Major shark and ray conservation project gets under way | News | Practical Fishkeeping

Major shark and ray conservation project gets under way | News | Practical Fishkeeping | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Fifteen-hour days, 22 manta rays tagged and 40 monitors installed across 130 km of sea bed: a team fof experts has revealed the progress made in its first expedition to Sudan to protect one of the ocean’s most endangered species.
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Who Removes Trash From Our Oceans? Divers of Course! | Ian Somerhalder Foundation

Who Removes Trash From Our Oceans? Divers of Course! | Ian Somerhalder Foundation | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it

Recently, on World Oceans Day 2011, Project AWARE unveiled their focused movement of divers by combining local efforts around the world. This movement was called Dive Against Debris, and is now a year-round debris removal and data collection effort to help reduce the devastating impacts of marine debris during each dive. Every collection process provides AWARE divers with tools and resources--including online information reporting systems--to help protect and gather key data about the state of our oceans. Divers around the world now have access to information about how to specifically organize and promote dives to remove debris and ways to report results; it allows divers make each dive a meaningful data collection event. Through promotion of these events, more dive operators from around the world are drawn to participate. Whereas divers were once steered away from areas where debris had collected, it is now a prime destination under the Dive Against Debris banner.

Divers no longer just remove trash; they are on a mission to help change waste management policies. Each dive helps collect underwater data that gives a true picture of marine debris issues. Currently in over 180 countries, the AWARE dive community is reporting all the underwater debris being found and removed. Divers are not only contributing to ocean conservation, they are helping to connect what is done underwater with shaping ocean policy changes. They are proud ‘protecting our oceans--one dive at a time.'

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California to Shift Shipping Lanes to Protect Endangered Whales

California to Shift Shipping Lanes to Protect Endangered Whales | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Whales off the coast of California can now swim a bit easier.

The route adjustments were recommended by the US Coast Guard and the NOOA following a series of whale deaths along the California coast by confirmed or likely ship strikes over the past six years. In 2007, four blue whales were killed in the Santa Barbara channel. In 2010, two blue, one humpback and two fins were killed in the San Francisco area and elsewhere along the north-central California coast. All three species are endangered. There are believed to be about 2,000 blue whales, 2,000 fin whales and 2,500 humpbacks in the northeast Pacific.

No one knows exactly why whales are so vulnerable to ship strikes. These sentient beings, among the largest animals on the planet (blue whales being the largest), are extremely graceful and highly agile in water — which leaves scientists puzzled as to why they cannot avoid ships. It is hypothesized that they become disoriented by the sound generated by engines, while others suspect that the high speeds of the ships make it difficult for the relatively slower-moving whales to avoid them.

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The Case of the Disappearing Fish: Drastic cuts in fish quotas expected - Boston Globe

The Case of the Disappearing Fish: Drastic cuts in fish quotas expected - Boston Globe | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Drastic cuts in fish quotas expected
Boston Globe
Researchers are just beginning to understand how the vast Gulf of Maine is responding to global warming and exactly what will happen to fragile fish populations.

While many fishermen are angry, others are resigned — because like the scientists, they can’t find the fish, either. Eight months into the fishing year, the entire fleet has caught just 44 percent of this year’s cod quota.

“I don’t know where the fish are,’’ said Jim Ford, an East Kingston, N.H., fisherman who catches cod out of Gloucester and Newburyport.

Temperature gear on his net that drags along the sea floor is recording temperatures of 50.5 degrees. “That is almost unheard of, we should be in the mid-40s,’’ Ford said. “It is too warm.”

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Want to Slow Sea Level Rise? Curb 4 Pollutants - Discovery News

Want to Slow Sea Level Rise? Curb 4 Pollutants - Discovery News | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
ClaimsJournal.com
Want to Slow Sea Level Rise?

The four pollutants — black carbon, methane, ozone and hydrofluorocarbons — all cycle through the atmosphere more quickly than carbon dioxide, which lasts for centuries in the troposphere, the part of the atmosphere we live in and breathe. Carbon dioxide is the main culprit in Earth's warming temperatures, which impacts sea level rise both by the expansion of water as it warms and by the melting of glacial ice.

Cutting the air pollutants, which all also act to trap heat in the atmosphere and last anywhere from a week to decade, worldwide by 30 to 60 percent over the next several decades would lower predicted sea level rise by 22 to 42 percent by 2100, according to the study, published April 14 in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Tepco Faces Decision to Dump Radioactive Water in Pacific - Businessweek

Tepco Faces Decision to Dump Radioactive Water in Pacific - Businessweek | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
TIME Tepco Faces Decision to Dump Radioactive Water in Pacific Businessweek While the company has since built a makeshift sealed cooling system, underground water is breaching basement walls at a rate of about 400 tons a day and becoming...

Reducing radiation levels in the water and pouring it into the sea is one of two options the utility has, said Kazuhiko Kudo, a research professor of nuclear engineering at Kyushu University. The other option is “to keep building above-ground storage tanks,” said Kudo. That’s a fight Tepco can’t win without stopping the underground water pouring into the basements, Kudo said.

“It is like a well. No matter how much water you draw from a well, underground water keeps seeping into the well,” said Kudo, who also served on a safety advisory board for the Fukushima plant after the disaster for the now defunct Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

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Pharmaceuticals Are Disrupting Streams - Science News - redOrbit

Pharmaceuticals Are Disrupting Streams - Science News - redOrbit | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Researchers wrote in the journal Ecological Applications that pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams.

“Pharmaceutical pollution is now detected in waters throughout the world. Causes include aging infrastructure, sewage overflows, and agricultural runoff,” said lead author Dr. Emma Rosi-Marshall, a scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. “Even when waste water makes it to sewage treatment facilities, they aren’t equipped to remove pharmaceuticals. As a result, our streams and rivers are exposed to a cocktail of synthetic compounds, from stimulants and antibiotics to analgesics and antihistamines.”

“We focused on the response of biofilms – which most people know as the slippery coating on stream rocks – because they’re vital to stream health,” Rosi-Marshall said “They might not look like much to the naked eye, but biofilms are complex communities composed of algae, fungi, and bacteria all living and working together. In streams, biofilms contribute to water quality by recycling nutrients and organic matter. They’re also a major food source for invertebrates that, in turn, feed larger animals like fish.”

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Teen invents device to clean giant ocean garbage patches

Teen invents device to clean giant ocean garbage patches | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
At an age when most people are just thinking about what they want to do with their lives, one 19 year old is inventing a method of cleaning up the ocean's plastic garbage patches.
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Sara Hepner's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:54 PM

What an awesome CmPS project this would be!

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How much water is needed to produce food and how much do we waste?

How much water is needed to produce food and how much do we waste? | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
As much as 50% of all food produced in the world ends up as waste every year according to figures from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. But how much water is needed to produce it?

IME claim that water requirements to meet food demand in 2050 could reach between 10-13.5tn cubic metres per year - about triple the current amount used annually by humans.

Meat production requires a much higher amount of water than vegetables. IME state that to produce 1kg of meat requires between 5,000 and 20,000 litres of water whereas to produce 1kg of wheat requires between 500 and 4,000 litres of water.

The table below shows typical values for the volume of water required to produce common foodstuffs. Chocolate tops the list with 17,196 litres of water need to produce 1kg of the product. Beef, sheep and pork meat all require high volumes of water for production also. Tea, beer and wine use the least according to the list. Compared to the production of meat, vegetable foodstuffs require considerably less water - 1kg of potatoes for example uses 287 litres of water.

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How To Extract Water From Thin Air (Video) | Self-Sufficiency

How To Extract Water From Thin Air (Video) | Self-Sufficiency | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Imagine if one day the power goes out on a nationwide scale, the water stops running and becomes scarce. How will you survive? Start thinking about collecting water from the atmosphere, there is over three quadillions of it floating around the...

 

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Waterless Middle East - could a shortage lead to war?

Waterless Middle East - could a shortage lead to war? | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Breaking News and Opinion

Watch the video.

Satellite images from NASA reveal an alarming depletion of two important fresh water sources in the Middle East. How bad is it & could the shortage lead to water wars?

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Transgenic salmon steak 'out soon' ("would you eat GM fish if it was labeled as such?")

Transgenic salmon steak 'out soon' ("would you eat GM fish if it was labeled as such?") | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
The first genetically modified fish could be about to arrive on dinner tables.

US biotechnology firm AquaBounty is at work in Canada harvesting eggs from genetically modified Atlantic salmon. Once grown (in onshore tanks based far away in Panama) the AquAdvantage salmon will look like their natural cousins, but reach full size in half the time. ...

The US food regulator, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), has just declared that transgenic AquAdvantage salmon have "no significant impact", which is usually the last step before the final approval.

If it comes, the salmon will become the first genetically modified (GM) animal approved for human consumption.


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WATCH: The Water Footprint Of A T-Shirt

WATCH: The Water Footprint Of A T-Shirt | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Do you know the environmental impact of the shirt on your back? This new video from World Wildlife Fund and National Geographic’s “Make Each Choice Count” series reveals the environmental effects of textile production.

Even if a t-shirt is made from an animal-free, all-natural material like cotton, there are still environmental consequences. According to Waterfootprint.org, cotton farming is the largest consumer of water in the apparel supply chain, and is used in40 percent of all clothing worldwide, reports The Guardian. Since it takes about 2,700 liters of water to make just one t-shirt, as the video explains, that means an inordinate amount of the world’s clean water is being concentrated in the textile industry. With accessible, clean water amounting to less than 1 percent of the world’s water supply, this resource is both valuable and finite.

The good news is that great strides are being made to reduce cotton's water footprint. Through the Better Cotton Initiative, the World Wildlife Fund has helped 75,000 farmers reduce their water use by 39 percent while increasing profits by 11 percent. In addition, major textile brands are looking towards more eco-friendly cotton production.

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Living Innovative's curator insight, February 7, 2013 8:37 AM

Check this out!

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, February 24, 2013 12:39 PM

I didn't know cotton farming was such a heavy water user.  Reducing the water requirement helps, but using renewable energy to make more clean water could take care of the rest of the need.  

 

However, we should probably develop more of the alternative natural fibers (http://www.naturalfibres2009.org/en/fibres/index.html), including Hemp, Flax, Coir, Jute, Ramie, and Sisal, and more plants that require processing (http://www.spin-knit-dye.com/natural-fibers.html) including rayons, viscose, bamboo, seaweed, soy, corn and tencel, as well as renewable animal coats including Llama, Alpaca (http://www.splitrockllamas.com/llama_and_alpaca_fiber.htm

Vicuna, Mohair, Angora, Camel, and Cashmere (http://info.fabrics.net/fabric-facts/wool/), and don't forget Silk (http://www.spin-knit-dye.com/silk-fiber.html).

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Concern mounts over ‘dead rivers’ - philippines.ucanews.com

Concern mounts over ‘dead rivers’ - philippines.ucanews.com | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Environmental group Greenpeace has welcomed recent government moves to address water pollution in the country, but said more must be done to save poll

The Environment Department has declared seven bodies of water as WQMAs. These are the Sinocalan-Dagupan river system in Pangasinan, the Marilao-Meycauayan-Obando river system and areas within the Laguna Lake Development Authority’s jurisdiction in Luzon, the Tigum-Aganan watershed and the Iloilo-Batiano river system in the Visayas, and the Silway River and the Sarangani Bay in Mindanao.

“Access to clean water is a fundamental human right and it is the duty of the government to guarantee this,” Paje said, adding that access to safe drinking water and sanitation is among the United Nations’ eight Millennium Development Goals.

Water pollution is one of the biggest problems affecting the Philippines. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources says at least 50 of the country’s 421 rivers are considered “biologically dead.”

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Sea-level rise: Where we stand at the start of 2013

Sea-level rise: Where we stand at the start of 2013 | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Progress has been made in recent years in understanding the observed past sea-level rise. As a result, process-based projections of future sea-level rise have become dramatically higher and are now closer to semi-empirical projections.

As a result of the IPCC-discussions, in 2006 I developed a complementary approach to estimating future sea-level rise and offered it to IPCC (but it was not used); this was published in Science in 2007 (and with over 300 citations to date it turned out to be the second-most-cited of the ~10,000 sea-level papers that were published since 2007). This “semi-empirical approach” linked the rate of global sea-level rise to global temperature in a simple physically motivated equation, calibrated with past data. It suggested that sea-level might rise about twice as much by 2100 AD as predicted by IPCC. My main conclusion was not that semi-empirical models are necessarily better, but that “the uncertainty in future sea-level rise is probably larger than previously estimated”. We will come back to this issue, i.e. the overall uncertainty across different model types and using all available information, in part 2 of this post.

Much higher projections than IPCC are also a consistent feature of more recent assessments published since 2007, e.g. the Antarctic Science Report, the Copenhagen Diagnosis, the Arctic Report of AMAP and the recent World Bank Report. Higher projections are also commonly used in coastal planning, e.g. in the Netherlands, in California and North Carolina, and included in the recommendations of the US Army Corps of Engineers. And last month NOAA published the following new sea-level scenarios for the US National Climate Assessment:

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Grabbing Water From Future Generations - Water Grabbers - National Geographic

Grabbing Water From Future Generations - Water Grabbers - National Geographic | Water Stewardship | Scoop.it
Many of the world's aquifers are being pumped dry to support unsustainable agriculture.

We are used to thinking of water as a renewable resource. However much we waste and abuse it, the rains will come again and the rivers and reservoirs will refill. Except during droughts, this is true for water at the surface. But not underground. As we pump more and more rivers dry, the world is increasingly dependent on subterranean water. That is water stored by nature in the pores of rocks, often for thousands of years, before we began to tap it with our drills and pumps.

We are emptying these giant natural reservoirs far faster than the rains can refill them. The water tables are falling, the wells have to be dug ever deeper, and the pumps must be ever bigger. We are mining water now that should be the birthright of future generations.

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