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US Navy begins inquiry into toxic waste dumping in Subic Bay, Philippines - aside from Phil Senate inquiry

US Navy begins inquiry into toxic waste dumping in Subic Bay, Philippines - aside from Phil Senate inquiry | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
The US Navy has launched its own investigation into allegations that its contractor has been dumping on Subic Bay hazardous wastes which it siphons from US Navy ships docked here.
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How wetlands provide free flood control - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium

How wetlands provide free flood control - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Coastal wetlands are ecosystems that serve many valuable functions; they are important sources of food and fresh water.

They provide valuable services, including water treatment and erosion control. Wetlands filter water and provide habitat for a number of animal and plant species. They also serve as recreational areas for various outdoor activities. Wetlands comprise large extensions of coastal land and are highly valuable because they protect coastal land from flooding and damage caused by natural phenomena, such as hurricanes and storms.

 

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Caribbean sardine collapse linked to climate change - SciDev.Net

Caribbean sardine collapse linked to climate change - SciDev.Net | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Changes in wind patterns and water circulation, caused by climate change, are depleting sardine numbers in the south Caribbean, finds a study. (Not the little salty fishes in tin cans!

The sardine, Sardinella aurita, feeds on plankton but since 2005, plankton levels in the Caribbean have reduced significantly, which, coupled with overfishing, may have contributed to the collapse of these fisheries — which plummeted by as much as 87 per cent, the study says.

The research team said that the decreasing levels of plankton production are the result of a reduction in ocean upwelling, whereby nutrients crucial for plankton production are brought from the sea's floor to the surface. The drop in upwelling has, in turn, been driven by changes in wind patterns and wind strength, themselves driven by global climate change.

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GoforWood.info | The use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (.eu)

GoforWood.info | The use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (.eu) | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Portal to the forestal, sylvicultural, woodworking and related trades and activities...

Over the last 6 months, the project has carried out a forest management plan for a plantation irrigated with treated waste water along the Suez Canal, Egypt; implemented a ferti-irrigation plant in Morocco and a phyto-depuration plant in an oasis of the Sahara desert in Algeria. Another two agroforestry systems will be designed to provide treated waste water in Tunisia. In the four Mediterranean countries, the FAO project aims to increase the quality and availability of water for agroforestry production to ensure food security and to control desertification. The project also provides country capacity building through training courses to national professionals as well as knowledge and technology transfer within project countries. A PhD student will work on the implementation of the ferti-irrigation plant of Marrakech. Despite the small budget and limited time, the project complies with the UNCCD and Bonn challenge to restore 150 million hectares of lost forests and degraded lands worldwide by 2020.

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Fecal matters - Why do we still let sewage overflow into our rivers and streams when a bad storm hits?

Fecal matters - Why do we still let sewage overflow into our rivers and streams when a bad storm hits? | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Why do we still let sewage overflow into our rivers and streams when a bad storm hits?

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 850 billion gallons of untreated water pours into waterways each year from roughly 772 communities with combined sewer systems, mostly concentrated in the Northeast and Midwest. In the West, Oregon and Washington have the vast majority of combined sewer systems, with three and eleven respectively. The effects of such spills are varied, but include contaminated shellfish and fish kills, beach closure, gastrointestinal illness in swimmers and general unpleasantness. 

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3 ways for companies to protect water resources and save money - GreenBiz.com

3 ways for companies to protect water resources and save money - GreenBiz.com | The Water Steward | Scoop.it

The Carbon Disclosure Project and General Electric both released reports on water this week. While the focus of the reports varied—CDP looked at how many companies are tracking, reporting and doing something about their impact on water while GE surveyed the general public to gauge consumer attitudes about water usage—the conclusions were roughly the same: Everyone knows we need to do something about water consumption, and there are plenty of opportunities to do so profitably. Those opportunities break down generally into three categories: reducing usage, reusing water and improving infrastructure.

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190m tonnes of ice a day has sea rising less than 1mm a year

190m tonnes of ice a day has sea rising less than 1mm a year | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
190m tonnes of ice a day has sea rising less than 1mm a year (RT @ClimateDesk: Wow: Antarctica is shedding an average of 190 million tonnes of ice every day.)...

Rapid melting in some parts of the continent is partially offset by heavy snowfalls elsewhere, meaning that the net loss of ice per year is about 69 billion tonnes.Previous studies had struggled to accurately map the land mass under most of Antarctica's huge ice shelves, and this knowledge is crucial to measuring the thickness of the ice.

As more ice melts, the land mass itself is gradually rising at a rate of about two millimetres per year, like a cake slowly baking in an oven.

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Enthusiastic Student Scientist Wins Attention for Promising Solar Clean Water Project

Enthusiastic Student Scientist Wins Attention for Promising Solar Clean Water Project | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Deepika Kurup's green and sustainable water purification project wins her honors as "America’s Top Young Scientist"...

Deepika designed a simple but elegant experiment. She created three UV-treatment vessels with catalytic rods: two using each photocatalyst on its own and a third with a combined TiO2-ZnO coating. A fourth plastic bottle without any photocatalyst served as a control. Deepika then sampled water from the bottles every three hours, using an incubator she developed herself to grow colonies in order to test the water contamination levels.

Deepika was able to prove that the combined TiO2-ZnO rods significantly accelerated the treatment time necessary to achieve clean water using the sun for treatment.

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Water, lifeblood of the state, gets ever costlier - Capitol Weekly (It's the same here in the Philippines)

Water, lifeblood of the state, gets ever costlier - Capitol Weekly (It's the same here in the Philippines) | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Water, lifeblood of the state, gets ever costlierCapitol WeeklyWater, always at the core of California's political and social fabric, is becoming even more precious as the population expands and the infrastructure withers.

In order to cover consistent costs with an inconsistent revenue source, rates have to go up. By demanding less water, the cities make it more expensive. Ratepayers, facing bills they often consider exorbitant -- $100 monthly tabs are not uncommon -- are not happy.

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Are You Bringing Toxic Fish to Your Dinner Table? Where are these toxins coming from?

Are You Bringing Toxic Fish to Your Dinner Table? Where are these toxins coming from? | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
New data collected by Columbia Riverkeeper show shocking levels of toxic pollution in local fishermen’s catch in Oregon and Washington at levels 27,000 percent above what the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considers safe...

The Columbia River contains too much toxic pollution, including:
• heavy metals, such as mercury, from factories and coal burning.
• PCBs that reach the Columbia through stormwater runoff, municipal discharge and dirty industrial sites.
• so-called “legacy pollutants,” such as DDT and TCE that are leaching from industrial sites.
• emerging pollutants, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting chemicals, which reach the river via city wastewater plants.

 

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Sea Level Rising Toward Washington and Other Cities (+ Manila) - Adaptation or Retreat?

Sea Level Rising Toward Washington and Other Cities (+ Manila) - Adaptation or Retreat? | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
(Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) How soon could ocean waters lap at Jefferson’s Feet? Manila already flooded regularly by the ocean; St.

The World’s Climate scientists report that…
1. About 100 years ago, after millennia of no significant change, sea level started rising, and at a fairly steady rate. Then, about 20 years ago, that rate accelerated sharply.

2. About 20 years ago, when sea level rise began to accelerate (after being relatively steady as it added those eight inches to the pre-industrial level), scientists wondered if an increase in melt-water from the immense ice sheets had begun to add even more water volume far sooner than they had expected. ...

4. A number of more recent peer-reviewed studies and measurements — several including satellite readings that show accelerating loss in the mass the Greenland and West Antarctica ice sheets — report those ice sheets now losing their frozen water at a rate far greater than predicted by the scientists only a few years ago — caused apparently by the rising temperatures of both the air above the ice sheets the ocean currents sweeping around their edges.

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The Coral Reef Crisis Threatens Nature's Ability To Help Us Deal With Climate ... - ThinkProgress

The Coral Reef Crisis Threatens Nature's Ability To Help Us Deal With Climate ... - ThinkProgress | The Water Steward | Scoop.it

"Many decisions and investments for coastal protection are being made today. The concern is that most money will go to gray infrastructure (artificial breakwaters and seawalls) – with further detrimental effects on coasts and habitats, expensive maintenance costs and no other benefits beyond their protective service.

"Green infrastructure solutions, like reef and mangrove conservation and restoration, are viable and cost effective alternatives. ...

"The benefits from natural solutions are real, but not a panacea. Indeed no defense guarantees protection; even the largest and most fortified barriers fail to offer complete protection (e.g., Japanese tsunami). It is also possible for any defense – green or gray – to funnel waters in ways that can increase hazards in other areas; barriers do not stop water, they redirect it.
"Bottom line: green infrastructure solutions for coastal protection to people and property must be valued alongside gray solutions."

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‘Selangor rivers polluted’ - due to uncontrolled urbanization.

‘Selangor rivers polluted’ - due to uncontrolled urbanization. | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
KUALA LUMPUR: Most rivers in Selangor which are the main sources of water supply in the state have been found to be polluted and could potentially become a serious threat to the availability of this basic necessity.

Universiti Putra Malaysia Environmental Forensics Research Centre unit head Dr Hafizan Juahir said the clean water sections of the rivers were getting shorter due to development, especially for housing.

For example, he said, the length of Sungai Langat, the leading source of raw water in the state, was 149.3km -long but the clean water section had been reduced to only 49.3km while the remaining were polluted.

“The entire length of Sungai Langat has entered the Class 3 and 4 categories of being polluted and if the quality worsens, it can be considered a dead river,” he said.

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Top 5 steps to control water pollution | Environmental Pollution

Top 5 steps to control water pollution | Environmental Pollution | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Top five steps to control water pollution should be taken with the collaboration of all main stakeholders including households, farmers, industries, civic agencies and environmental watchdogs.
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Melting in the Andes: Goodbye glaciers - "How will this affect lives of millions?"

Melting in the Andes: Goodbye glaciers - "How will this affect lives of millions?" | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Researchers are racing to determine how shrinking glaciers in the Andes will affect the water supply of millions of people.

But although everyone fears a water shortage, they do not know how quickly it will come or how severe it will be.

An interdisciplinary team of scientists is now trying to provide some answers through a US$1-million project funded by the US National Science Foundation. The crew, which pulls together hydrologists, geochemists, geographers and historians, mainly from the United States and Canada, is tracking the fate of glacial meltwater as it runs from the mountains down to the ocean. Their goal is to develop models to forecast water flow and its effects on residents downstream. 

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Research Reveals Why Sea Levels Are Rising Faster Than Previously Feared - Current TV

Research Reveals Why Sea Levels Are Rising Faster Than Previously Feared - Current TV | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Science a GogoResearch Reveals Why Sea Levels Are Rising Faster Than Previously FearedCurrent TV"There is an Arctic sea ice connection," says Hay, despite the fact that melting sea ice - which is already in the ocean - does not itself raise sea...

The last official IPCC report in 2007 projected a global sea level rise between 0.2 and 0.5 meters by the year 2100. But current sea-level rise measurements meet or exceed the high end of that range and suggest a rise of one meter or more by the end of the century.

When sea ice melts, Hay explains, there is an oceanographic effect of releasing more fresh water from the Arctic, which is then replaced by inflows of brinier, warmer water from the south.

"So it's a big heat pump that brings heat to the Arctic," added Hay. "That's not in any of the models." That warmer water pushes the Arctic toward more ice-free waters, which absorb sunlight rather than reflect it back into space like sea ice does. The more open water there is, the more heat is trapped in the Arctic waters, and the warmer things can get.

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Flood risk will rise with climate change, experts say - Washington Post

Flood risk will rise with climate change, experts say - Washington Post | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Flood risk will rise with climate change, experts sayWashington PostAs the Northeast struggles with the aftermath of the massive storm Sandy, many experts say the government for years has underestimated how much of the nation is prone to flooding,...

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said policymakers need to acknowledge that the infrastructure in place along the East Coast cannot withstand the changing climate.

“Anyone who thinks that there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns is denying reality,” Cuomo said at a news conference Tuesday. “We have a new reality, and old infrastructures and old systems.”

Flood planning is based on historical data rather than future projections. And much of the infrastructure damaged in a storm is rebuilt exactly the same way, without taking into account the climatic changes underway.

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Optimism on Antarctica marine reserve - 2M sq.km., the world's largest

Optimism on Antarctica marine reserve - 2M sq.km., the world's largest | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Optimism on Antarctica marine reserve...

The wildlife rich Ross Sea, south-east of Australia, could have the world's largest single marine reserve, after New Zealand and the US are said to have overcome differences in fishing still to be conducted there.

As part of the nearly 2 million square kilometre reserve, a special scientific zone will be offered as an additional layer of protection, observers said.

A joint proposal by Australia, France and the European Union for a set of reserves covering 1.9 million square kilometres in the East Antarctic region is also before the meeting for decision this week.

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Can we protect 10 percent of the oceans? Momentum is growing.

Can we protect 10 percent of the oceans? Momentum is growing. | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
An international goal is to set aside 10 percent of coastal and marine waters as protected areas by 2020. Although much work remains to reach the goal, areas are being added at an accelerated pace.

Between 2003 and 2007, marine-protected areas grew at a rate of about 11.8 percent a year to cover about 2.5 million square kilometers (about 965,000 square miles). By 2010, protected areas covered about 4.8 million square kilometers, an average growth rate of 31 percent for each of the intervening three years. This year, protected areas cover about 8.2 million square kilometers, which would put the growth rate since 2010 at an average of 35 percent a year.

Over the next 12 to 24 months, another 5.2 million square kilometers could be added if Cook Islands, Australia, and New Caledonia follow through on their plans to establish or expand protected areas.

Protected areas are being added so fast that "you can't keep up to date with these things," Dr. Spalding says. "It's a huge acceleration."

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Environmentalists Score Win To Protect Endangered Fish - Patch.com

Environmentalists Score Win To Protect Endangered Fish - Patch.com | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Press-EnterpriseEnvironmentalists Score Win To Protect Endangered FishPatch.comA federal lawsuit filed by a dozen Inland Empire water agencies challenging the Obama administration's decision to expand the habitat for an endangered fish species was...

According to a study by the Moreland, Idaho-based Western Legacy Alliance, which promotes private property rights, the Center for Biological Diversity filed more than 400 species protection-related lawsuits between 2001 and 2009.

A Wildlife Service spokeswoman said the critical habitat designation will not hinder agencies from drawing water from the Santa Ana or other areas where the sucker spawns; rather, the designation provides an "additional layer of review" before developers or municipalities can proceed with making any changes along channels recognized as critical to a threatened species.

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'Clean Coal' Is Poisoning Our Water - Care2.com (blog)

'Clean Coal' Is Poisoning Our Water - Care2.com (blog) | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
'Clean Coal' Is Poisoning Our WaterCare2.com (blog)Blocked from drifting into the air, these contaminants have simply found another way into our world, in the solid waste residue and wastewater produced by the facilities.

According to a Duke University-led study, North Carolina rivers and lakes downstream from the settling ponds of coal-fired power plants have dangerously high levels of cadmium, selenium, antimony and thallium. This result is unexpected, since local power plants were retrofitted with scrubbers and other technologies designed to reduce the health threat of coal fired power.

Blocked from drifting into the air, these contaminants have simply found another way into our world, in the solid waste residue and wastewater produced by the facilities. In fact, plants attempting to produce the mythical “clean coal” through the use of scrubbers and other flue gas desulfurization technologies could have greater concentrations of selenium and other contaminants in their wastewater than traditional facilities.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/clean-coal-is-poisoning-our-water.html#ixzz2A0GfvfpE

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Scientists confirm water extraction helped trigger deadly 2011 quake ...

Scientists confirm water extraction helped trigger deadly 2011 quake ... | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Massive extraction of groundwater helped unleash an earthquake in southeastern Spain last year that killed nine people, injured at least 100 and left thousands homeless, geologists said on Sunday. The finding adds a ...
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Coal Plant Scrubbers Increase Water Contamination in Local Waterways

Coal Plant Scrubbers Increase Water Contamination in Local Waterways | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
For the last two years, Western North Carolina Alliance’s two Riverkeepers Hartwell Carson and Donna Lisenby have researched water pollution impacts from the Asheville coal-fired power plant.

Yesterday, Duke University released an important study documenting high levels of water pollution in rivers across North Carolina from ten coal-fired power plants. The study results showed that the French Broad River and Mountain Island Lake have the highest levels of arsenic contamination of all the sites studied. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standard for arsenic is 10 µg/L. The Duke University study found 44.5 µg/L of arsenic at the Asheville coal-fired power plant discharge into the French Broad River and a whopping 92 µg/L of arsenic in the Riverbend discharge to Mountain Island Lake. This small lake provides drinking water to nearly one million people in the greater Charlotte region of Mecklenburg and Gaston counties.

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Pollution, rampant trawling hit fish catch along AP coast - Times of India (It's also happening in the Phil)

Pollution, rampant trawling hit fish catch along AP coast - Times of India (It's also happening in the Phil) | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Pollution, rampant trawling hit fish catch along AP coastTimes of IndiaVISAKHAPATNAM: Fish catch in coastal AP has plummeted by almost 40% besides registering a sharp decline in marine biodiversity and disruption in ecosystem with several endemic...

This is direct fallout of indiscriminate and unscientific exploitation by trawler nets, unchecked pollution and lack of implementation of government regulations.

Researchers and experts express concern and point out that alternative methods of fish catching and livelihood for the fishing community are a must to save the marine biodiversity. B Baratha Lakshmi, director, Academic Staff College, Andhra University, who is involved in biodiversity conservation, points out that untreated release of effluents including heavy metals, chemicals and its sewage, pesticides, pharma factories and oil spills from ships have wreaked havoc on the marine life on AP coast.

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Climate Change and Seafood Supply: Developing Countries Most Vulnerable to Ocean Acidification

Climate Change and Seafood Supply: Developing Countries Most Vulnerable to Ocean Acidification | The Water Steward | Scoop.it

"Scientists have already observed disturbing trends in ocean acidification and climate change. Since the Industrial Revolution, ocean pH has decreased by roughly 30 percent. The change in pH spells serious trouble for coral reefs and shellfish that rely on calcium to grow. In increasingly acidic waters, less calcium is available.

"Ocean temperatures are also rising dramatically in numerous regions. This change is forcing some marine species to move closer to the poles or into deeper waters. Many fish species are predicted to shift towards the poles at a rate of around 20 miles per decade. Poorer nations do not possess the industrial fishing fleets to chase these moving populations."

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