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Endangered Coral Reefs Die as Ocean Temperatures Rise and Water Turns Acidic - PBS NewsHour

Endangered Coral Reefs Die as Ocean Temperatures Rise and Water Turns Acidic - PBS NewsHour | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Endangered Coral Reefs Die as Ocean Temperatures Rise and Water Turns Acidic PBS NewsHour In addition to negative consequences caused by overfishing and pollution, coral reefs face another major existential threat: increased acidity from warming...

According to data from more than 100 monitoring stations in the Florida Keys, there has been a 44 percent decline in coral reefs over the past 20 years. On many Caribbean reefs, it's even worse. The decline is up to 80 percent over the past three decades.

The nurseries have been successful, growing a small forest of elkhorn coral that Nedimyer and his volunteers almost can't replant fast enough.

But there's a bigger challenge these corals face: the impact of increased carbon dioxide in the water.

Acidification acts a lot like osteoporosis does in humans. But in marine animals, it makes their shells and skeletons brittle. The more acidic the water, the harder it is for corals to grow their skeletons. That leaves them more susceptible throughout their lives to other stressors like disease.


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UNBELIEVABLE : Mermaid Sighting in Kiryat Yam,Israel

Video and info by Animal Planet! The first ever recorded mermaid sighting in Kiryat Yam I DON'T KNOW IF IT'S REAL I JUST REUPLOADED THIS VIDEO!

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Great Lakes region pins economic hopes on water - Boston Herald

Great Lakes region pins economic hopes on water - Boston Herald | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Boston Herald
Great Lakes region pins economic hopes on water
Boston Herald
MILWAUKEE — Business and government leaders in the Great Lakes region are pinning hopes for a return to prosperity on a precious resource: fresh water.
They're encouraging the development of a so-called "blue economy" — a network of industries that make products and provide services related to water, from pump and valve manufacturers to resorts offering lakefront vacations. It's happening as growing water scarcity casts a shadow over the economic boom in Sun Belt states. They've benefited for decades from an exodus of people and jobs from the Upper Midwest as its industrial core faded. In Milwaukee, an organization called The Water Council is opening a refurbished building this summer that will bring together scientists and entrepreneurs to develop water-related businesses.
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Inaction on water issues will only create a greater crisis for the next generation - MinnPost

Inaction on water issues will only create a greater crisis for the next generation - MinnPost | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
MinnPost.com
Inaction on water issues will only create a greater crisis for the next generation
MinnPost.com
Wars have and will be fought over water; it's a reality that we've been lulled into thinking can never happen here.

Our first responsibility in facing the issue is to rely on experts. For too long we have ignored what science can show us about stewardship. Our demand for “progress” has caused us to marginalize the chorus of professional warnings. Embracing the reality of what the hydrologists and soil scientists are saying is an acknowledgement that something is wrong and needs our attention.

As we move into action with water planning, the inevitability of legal challenges will be part of the process. This brings us to the next responsibility: drafting sound law. Establishing responsible and sustainable water legislation is a major component of moving our nation into water security.

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Earth Day: Artist Willie Cole recycles water bottles into chandeliers for ... - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com

Earth Day: Artist Willie Cole recycles water bottles into chandeliers for ... - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Earth Day: Artist Willie Cole recycles water bottles into chandeliers for ...

In the Earth Day-related exhibit, water bottles are at once symbols of Cole's environmentalism, his belief in the oneness of all that exists, and his success at supporting himself with his art.

Joined by lengths of sturdy wire, the array of empty bottles represents the connection of thousands of individuals. "When the water flows out of the bottle the person's breath flows into the bottle," Cole says. "That breath, to me, represents the spirit."

"The multiplication of single objects is a study in oneness," he explains. "Even though we appear to be separate and different. there's only one life force and it's in all of us, so we are all connected."

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Global action urged to save oceans from pollution, acidification - Business Recorder (blog)

Global action urged to save oceans from pollution, acidification - Business Recorder (blog) | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Business Recorder (blog) Global action urged to save oceans from pollution, acidification Business Recorder (blog) image UNITED NATIONS: Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon Thursday called on world leaders to take stronger action to protect the planet's...

"We need practical, timely action at the national, regional and global levels to improve the health of the oceans, and to recover and sustain ocean resources," he told "The High Seas, Our Future! Conference" in a message read out in Paris by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Director-General Irina Bokova. 

"It is time to take stronger, more pragmatic and more concerted effort to protect our oceans," he said, stressing that oceans were heating up and their acidification was adversely affecting on marine life, while rising sea levels threatened to re-draw the global map at the expense of hundreds of millions of people, often the most vulnerable.

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Rising Seas Swallow 8 Cities in These Climate Change GIFs ("power of pictures")

Rising Seas Swallow 8 Cities in These Climate Change GIFs ("power of pictures") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Climate change and global warming may cause sea levels to rise and flood coastal cities across the world. Over the past century, the Global Mean Sea Level has risen by 4 to 8 in...

How will the world look if that happens? In November of 2012, The New York Times published interactive maps displaying the effects of the sea level rising, in a series titled "What Could Disappear?" The maps show how much land the sea will claim in the future, if it rises by 5, 12, and 25 feet.

Nickolay Lamm, a 24-year-old researcher and artist saw the interactive maps and wondered: "What would this actually look like in real life?" Lamm told Mashable in an email interview that "the only imagery I had of sea level rise came from Hollywood." So he decided to put his skills to work.

"I felt that if I could bring these maps to life, it would force people to look at sea level rise in a new way," he said.

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Microbes Buried Deep in Ocean Crust May Form World’s Largest Ecosystem

Microbes Buried Deep in Ocean Crust May Form World’s Largest Ecosystem | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Far below the ocean floor, scientists have discovered a microbial community away from undersea vents, beyond the reach of the sun (RT @mocost: Microbes Buried Deep in Ocean Crust May Form World’s Largest Ecosystem

If you were to hit the seafloor and continue to travel down, you’d run into an ecosystem unlike any other on earth. Beneath several hundred meters of seafloor sediment is the Earth’s crust: thick layers of lava rock running with cracks that cover around 70% of the planet’s surface. Seawater flows through the cracks, and this system of rock-bound rivulets is enormous: it’s the largest aquifer on earth, containing 4% of global ocean volume, says Mark Lever, an ecologist who studies anaerobic (no-oxygen) carbon cycling at Aarhus University in Denmark.

The sub-seafloor crust may also be the largest ecosystem on earth, according to a new study by Lever, published this month in Science. For seven years, he incubated 3.5 million-year old basalt rock collected from 565 meters below the ocean floor–the depth of nearly two stacked Eiffel towers–and found living microbes. These microbes live far away from the thriving bacterial communities at mid-ocean ridges, and survive by slowly churning sulfur and other minerals into energy.

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In Asia, tide slowly turning against shark fin soup

In Asia, tide slowly turning against shark fin soup | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Will lovers of the deluxe Chinese dish eat shark species into extinction?

But the anti-finning camp is buoyed by a slew of major victories. Basketball star Yao Ming, celebrity royalty in China, has publicly urged China’s government to ban shark fin consumption. Last year, China’s Communist Party vowed to phase out shark fin soup from official functions. Taiwan, the fourth-largest shark fin market, has legally forbidden fishermen from sawing off shark fins and dumping the carcass overboard. The same rule applies to boatmen in EuropeanUnion waters.

The latest research into endangered shark populations, recently published in the journal Marine Policy, contends that a whopping 100 million, and perhaps up to 273 million, are killed each year. At this clip, several sought-after species — the scalloped hammerhead, the porbeagle and the oceanic whitetip — may not be able to reproduce fast enough to stave off extinction.

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Changing ecosystem concerns fishermen | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Changing ecosystem concerns fishermen | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
They're not alone: As Gulf of Maine waters become warmer and more acidic, scientists too worry about the implications for the region's fisheries. (Sea temps rise in Gulf of Maine.
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Toilet-to-tap: recycled water gets the hard sell ("cheaper than desalination")

Toilet-to-tap: recycled water gets the hard sell ("cheaper than desalination") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Australians will be encouraged to embrace highly treated sewage for drinking in the strongest push so far to overcome the "yuck factor" and push the contentious option onto the national agenda.
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Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour - The Province

Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour - The Province | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
BBC News
Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour
The Province
Video: Ocean churns with thousands of dolphins in front of San Diego boat tour. The Province February 18, 2013 1:46 PM.
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Finally. Research shows beer healthier than water - Hot Air

Finally. Research shows beer healthier than water - Hot Air | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Finally. Research shows beer healthier than water
Hot Air
KANSAS CITY, Missouri – Forget water or Gatorade. The drink of choice to rehydrate after a workout is beer.

Not only did the beer rehydrate the test subjects better, but the alcohol apparently served as a minor pain reliever for the aches and stresses of working out. Of course, even the eggheads running this promising study failed to see the forest for the trees, missing the one obvious solution to the entire conundrum. If you just didn’t work out in the first place and stayed on the couch drinking beer, you would require neither hydration or pain relief. But we’ll clearly have to be patient and bring these people around one step at a time.

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Can the World Afford Cheap Water? | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

Can the World Afford Cheap Water? | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
More people in India have access to cellphones than to basic sanitation. Meanwhile, more than 7,000 villages in the northwestern part of the country suffer drinking ...

That means extending clean water to the poorest people who still lack it will become an even bigger challenge in future. Columbia’s Modi suggested that an investment of as little as $300 per family could extend water systems to many if not all of those without today. “I think it’s within reach of the governments of the world,” he argued. “If you make that investment, then even the poorest are willing to pay for maintaining that system.

But keeping that water clean may prove the hardest challenge of all. “More people in sub-Saharan Africa have cellphones than have electricity,” Modi added. “Electricity is the next challenge but, even harder than electricity is water, and even harder than water appears to be sanitation.”

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World's oldest flowing water, trapped in mine for billions of years

World's oldest flowing water, trapped in mine for billions of years | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Water found in a deep, isolated reservoir in Timmins, Ont., has been trapped there for 1.5 billion to 2.64 billion years — since around the time the first multicellular life arose on the planet — Canadian and British scientists say.

 

The water pouring out of boreholes 2.4 kilometres below the surface in the northern Ontario copper and zinc mine is older than any other free-flowing water ever discovered. It is rich in dissolved gases such as hydrogen and methane that could theoretically provide support for microbial life.

 

"What we can be sure of is that we have identified a way in which planets can create and preserve an environment friendly to microbial life for billions of years," said a statement from Greg Holland, the Lancaster University geochemist who is the lead author of the study.

 

His Canadian co-authors included Barbara Sherwood Lollar and Georges Lacrampe-Couloume at the University of Toronto; Greg Slater at McMaster University in Hamilton; and Long Li, who is currently an assistant professor at the University of Alberta, but worked on the project while at the University of Toronto.

 

Some Canadian members of the team are currently testing the water to see if it contains microbial life — if they exist, those microbes may have been isolated from the sun and the Earth's surface for billions of years and may reveal how microbes evolve in isolation.

 

Microbes that have been isolated for tens of millions of years have been found in water with similar chemistry at even slightly deeper depths below the surface in a South African gold mine, using hydrogen gas as an energy source, the researchers noted.

 

The researchers estimated how old the water was based on an analysis of the xenon gas dissolved in it. Like many other elements, xenon comes in forms with different masses, known as isotopes. The water in the Timmins mine contained an unusually high level of lighter isotopes of xenon that are thought to have come from the Earth's atmosphere at the time it became trapped.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, ABroaderView
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Deep sea 'gold rush' moves closer ("Who will monitor the damage underwater?")

Deep sea 'gold rush' moves closer ("Who will monitor the damage underwater?") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
The prospect of a deep sea "gold rush" opening a controversial new frontier for mining on the ocean floor has moved a step closer.

The idea of exploiting the gold, copper, manganese, cobalt and other metals of the ocean floor has been considered for decades but only recently became feasible with high commodity prices and new technology.

Conservation experts have long warned that mining the seabed will be highly destructive and could have disastrous long-term consequences for marine life.

The ISA study itself recognizes that mining will cause "inevitable environmental damage".

But the report comes amid what a spokesman describes as "an unprecedented surge" of interest from state-owned and private mining companies.

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BusinessMirror - Benguet water project benefits 5 barangays and saves trees

BusinessMirror - Benguet water project benefits 5 barangays and saves trees | The Water Steward | Scoop.it

The project involves the construction of a combination of iron removal filter, water tank, spring box, biogas digester and bio-sand filters, primarily to address the water needs of people, and apply biogas technology to complement a backyard swine raising livelihood project in certain areas.

A total of 54 facilities were constructed under the project, which also served as on-the-job training for 23 fabricator-trainees or para-engineers who are now service providers for CPWASH projects in other areas.

The spring box and water tank harnesses spring water from source.  The water is then distributed to communities where people will fetch them with ease and for now, since the project was completed, at no cost to residents, because the CPWASH facilities are being maintained by community-based organizations, with subsidy from the Kapangan-LGU.

Another major component of the project—the biogas digester—allows farmers to produce biogas that complements the swine-raising livelihood project in selected areas.

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Want to Slow Sea Level Rise? Curb 4 Pollutants - Discovery News

Want to Slow Sea Level Rise? Curb 4 Pollutants - Discovery News | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
ClaimsJournal.com
Want to Slow Sea Level Rise?

The four pollutants — black carbon, methane, ozone and hydrofluorocarbons — all cycle through the atmosphere more quickly than carbon dioxide, which lasts for centuries in the troposphere, the part of the atmosphere we live in and breathe. Carbon dioxide is the main culprit in Earth's warming temperatures, which impacts sea level rise both by the expansion of water as it warms and by the melting of glacial ice.

Cutting the air pollutants, which all also act to trap heat in the atmosphere and last anywhere from a week to decade, worldwide by 30 to 60 percent over the next several decades would lower predicted sea level rise by 22 to 42 percent by 2100, according to the study, published April 14 in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Tepco Faces Decision to Dump Radioactive Water in Pacific - Businessweek

Tepco Faces Decision to Dump Radioactive Water in Pacific - Businessweek | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
TIME Tepco Faces Decision to Dump Radioactive Water in Pacific Businessweek While the company has since built a makeshift sealed cooling system, underground water is breaching basement walls at a rate of about 400 tons a day and becoming...

Reducing radiation levels in the water and pouring it into the sea is one of two options the utility has, said Kazuhiko Kudo, a research professor of nuclear engineering at Kyushu University. The other option is “to keep building above-ground storage tanks,” said Kudo. That’s a fight Tepco can’t win without stopping the underground water pouring into the basements, Kudo said.

“It is like a well. No matter how much water you draw from a well, underground water keeps seeping into the well,” said Kudo, who also served on a safety advisory board for the Fukushima plant after the disaster for the now defunct Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

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Pharmaceuticals Are Disrupting Streams - Science News - redOrbit

Pharmaceuticals Are Disrupting Streams - Science News - redOrbit | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Researchers wrote in the journal Ecological Applications that pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams.

“Pharmaceutical pollution is now detected in waters throughout the world. Causes include aging infrastructure, sewage overflows, and agricultural runoff,” said lead author Dr. Emma Rosi-Marshall, a scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. “Even when waste water makes it to sewage treatment facilities, they aren’t equipped to remove pharmaceuticals. As a result, our streams and rivers are exposed to a cocktail of synthetic compounds, from stimulants and antibiotics to analgesics and antihistamines.”

“We focused on the response of biofilms – which most people know as the slippery coating on stream rocks – because they’re vital to stream health,” Rosi-Marshall said “They might not look like much to the naked eye, but biofilms are complex communities composed of algae, fungi, and bacteria all living and working together. In streams, biofilms contribute to water quality by recycling nutrients and organic matter. They’re also a major food source for invertebrates that, in turn, feed larger animals like fish.”

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Teen invents device to clean giant ocean garbage patches

Teen invents device to clean giant ocean garbage patches | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
At an age when most people are just thinking about what they want to do with their lives, one 19 year old is inventing a method of cleaning up the ocean's plastic garbage patches.
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Sara Hepner's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:54 PM

What an awesome CmPS project this would be!

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How much water is needed to produce food and how much do we waste?

How much water is needed to produce food and how much do we waste? | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
As much as 50% of all food produced in the world ends up as waste every year according to figures from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. But how much water is needed to produce it?

IME claim that water requirements to meet food demand in 2050 could reach between 10-13.5tn cubic metres per year - about triple the current amount used annually by humans.

Meat production requires a much higher amount of water than vegetables. IME state that to produce 1kg of meat requires between 5,000 and 20,000 litres of water whereas to produce 1kg of wheat requires between 500 and 4,000 litres of water.

The table below shows typical values for the volume of water required to produce common foodstuffs. Chocolate tops the list with 17,196 litres of water need to produce 1kg of the product. Beef, sheep and pork meat all require high volumes of water for production also. Tea, beer and wine use the least according to the list. Compared to the production of meat, vegetable foodstuffs require considerably less water - 1kg of potatoes for example uses 287 litres of water.

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How To Extract Water From Thin Air (Video) | Self-Sufficiency

How To Extract Water From Thin Air (Video) | Self-Sufficiency | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Imagine if one day the power goes out on a nationwide scale, the water stops running and becomes scarce. How will you survive? Start thinking about collecting water from the atmosphere, there is over three quadillions of it floating around the...

 

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Waterless Middle East - could a shortage lead to war?

Waterless Middle East - could a shortage lead to war? | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
Breaking News and Opinion

Watch the video.

Satellite images from NASA reveal an alarming depletion of two important fresh water sources in the Middle East. How bad is it & could the shortage lead to water wars?

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Transgenic salmon steak 'out soon' ("would you eat GM fish if it was labeled as such?")

Transgenic salmon steak 'out soon' ("would you eat GM fish if it was labeled as such?") | The Water Steward | Scoop.it
The first genetically modified fish could be about to arrive on dinner tables.

US biotechnology firm AquaBounty is at work in Canada harvesting eggs from genetically modified Atlantic salmon. Once grown (in onshore tanks based far away in Panama) the AquAdvantage salmon will look like their natural cousins, but reach full size in half the time. ...

The US food regulator, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), has just declared that transgenic AquAdvantage salmon have "no significant impact", which is usually the last step before the final approval.

If it comes, the salmon will become the first genetically modified (GM) animal approved for human consumption.


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